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May 26, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-26

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THE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

op.
"AN

Phonest:- iftorial 2414
Business 960
1'FTLEGRAPTl SERVICE BY THE
NEWYORIKSUN

---~=- --_______________

VOL. XXVI. No. 167.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

_Mr____,_Fl___.___

FREDERIC GOUDERT
SPEAKS TODAY IN
HILL AUDITORIUMI
WILL DELIVER ANNUAL PUBLIC
ADDRESS OF ORDER OF,
TILE COIF
IS ATTORNEY IN APPAM TRIAL
Prominent Lawyers From Out of Town
to Attend; Lecture Set for
4:15 o'Clock
Frederic R. Coudert, distinguished
counsellor, international lawyer, pub-
licist and speaker, will deliver the an-
nual public address before the local
chapter of the Order of the Coif at Hill
auditorium this afternoon at 4:15
o'clock. The address will be open to
the public. "Some Current Problems
in International Law" is announced as
the subject.
In the Appam trial; of national in-
terest, Mr. Coudert is representing the
vessel's owners in trying the issue
of whether or not Germany may hold
the ship as a prize of war. His being
chosen for that important task is a
recognition of his high standing , in
international law. The firm of which
he is senior member probably has the
largest practice in the United States
in admiralty and international law.
Members of the law and political
science faculties say that Mr. Cou-
dert's address on the subject an-
nounced should not only prove inter-
esting, but also be of great public sig-
nificance, speaking as Mr. Coudert
does with more license and authority
on the matter than any living Ameri-
can. "The University of Michigan
should realize its great opportunity
in hearing Mr. Coudert at this time,"
said Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, when interviewed. "We have
several times previously asked him to
appear before the Coif, because we
felt that he represented the best side
of the legal profession, but at this
particular time, his appearance 3 is
doubly important, for old internation-
al concepts are day by day being ex-
ploded and the problem of reconstruct-
ing rules, for the future is an immense
one. In its -solution Mr. Coudert will
no doubt take an important part."
Prof. J. S. Reeves, of the political sci-]
(Continued on Page Six)

Team toy Leave
,for Aggie Tilt
Varsity Baseball Squad IVill Make
Trip to Lansing in Spe-
cial Cars
The Varsity baseball team and sub-
stitutes, comprising about 27 men, un-
der Coach Lundgren, and Manager
Sidney Steen, will leave Ann Arbor at
8:22 o'clock tomorrow morning for
Lansing, arriving at the Michigan Ag-
ricultural College's stronghold at 11:00
o'clock.
Special cars will be provided for the
Wolverine athletes, and athletic au-
thorities announce that any students
who wish to accompany the team can
be accommodated on the special train.
On the return trip, a special train will
leave Lansing at 7:30 o'clock, arriving
in Ann Arbor at 9:45 o'clock.
The fare for students making the
trip will be $2.45 for the round trip.
Admission to the Aggie athletic field
will probably be 50 cents.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE GIVES DANCE
Tickets to Go on Sale at Union Next
Wednesday for Party
To wind up the season, the Women's
league will give a dance on Saturday,
June 3, at 8:30 o'clock. This is the
first time the league has given such

an affair.

Special music will be fur-I

nished, and refreshments are being
provided by town alumnae and facul-
ty women. Tickets will be limited in
number, and will go on sale at the
Union Wednesday, May 31. The com-
mittee in charge is: Anna Lloyd, '18,
chairman;Ada Heath, '18, Mildred Hill,
'18, Jeanette Armstrong, '17, and Lin-
da Eberbach, '18.
WOOLSACK HOLDS INITIATION
Neophytes of Fresh Law Class Given
Banquet at Mack's
Woolsack, junior honor law society,
held its spring initiation and banquet
last night. The initiates, picked from
the present freshman law class, fol-
low: J. M. Barrett, L. C. Boltwood, J.
H. Cartwright, R. S. Day, L. B. Emer-
man, R. A. Fox, Leon Greenbaum, A. C.
Ruihley, J M. Seabright and G. W.
Williams.
The initiation banquet was held at
Mack's tea room.

BERLIN REPORTS
ATTACKREPULSED
War Office Announces Beating Back
of Three Counter Movements
by French'
GERMANS STRIKE AT VERDUN
Berlin, May 25.-Repulse of three
counter attacks by the French in the
village of Cumieres west of the Meuse
on the Verdun front, was announced
by the war office today. The capture
of additional French trenches south-
west and south of Fort Douautnont,
and the recapture of the Haudremont
quarry by the Germans are also re-
ported. All-day attacks by the French
on the German lines in the aCillette
wood southeast of Fort Douaumont,
in which the French met with severe
losses, were beaten off by the Ger-
mans, who report the capture of more
than 850 prisoners and 14 machine
guns.
Paris, May 25.-German troops at-
tacked the French positions on the
Verdun front east of the Meuse, near
the Haudremont quarry, last night, and
obtained a footing in one of the French
trenches, the war office announced to-
day. East of Cumieres, west of the
Meuse, the French made some pro-
gress in grenadenfighting. There was
no infantry action at Fort l:)ouaunroit
last night.
BAND PLAYS OUTSIDE TONIGHT
Second Open-Air Concert of Season
Set for 6:45 o'Clock
The Varsity band will give the sec-
ond open air concert of the season at
the campus band stand this evening
at 6:45 o'clock. Captain Wilson prom-
ises a program varying from the
"Tales of Hoffmann" to "Underneath
the Stars." It is expected that the se-
niors and the combined musical clubs
will come out to intersperse the band
music with vocal efforts.
The bandsmen will have a busy time
of it for the rest of the year. In ad-
dition to the appearances at the cam-
pus concerts and baseball games, they
will be on hand at the Interscholastic,
the Decoration Day parade, the regat-
ta, and will play during Commence-
ment week.
THREE MEN NOMINATED FOR
COUNCILMAN BY ENGINEERS
S. S. Atwood, E. G. Dudley, and W.
M. McKee were nominated for the po-
sition of student councilman at the
sophomore engineering assembly held
yesterday morning. Election will be
held next Wednesday in the second
floor coi'ridor of the Engineering
building. The man elected will hold
office through his junior year and the
first semester of his senior year.
Art Association to Go to Detroit
The Ann Arbor Art association is
planning to conduct an excursion to
Detroit to visit the second annual ex-
hibition of selected paintings by Amer-
ican artists, which is now being con-
ducted at the Detroit Museum of Art.
The excursion will be under the guid-
ance of Professors Cross and Makiel-
ski, and will leave Saturday morning.
at 9:30 o'clock on the Michigan Cen-
tral railroad.

COOK,' 7LELECTED
HEAD Of COUNCIL

Oiter Oifiers Chosen: Plan
m tions in Cap Nighbt
Festivities

linino-I

MAKECGLASSES PAY FOR ROPE?
Grant L. Cook, '17L, was elected
president of the Student Council for
the college year 1916-1917, at its meet-
ing held last night, succeeding Henry
C. Rummel, 'L, who headed the or-
ganization this year. The other of-
ficers elected are as follows: Vice-
president H. L. Carroll, '17E; record-
ing secretary, A. S. Hart, '17; cor-
responding secretary, R. M. Carson,
'17; treasurer, H. A. Taylor, '17E.
At the meeting it was announced
that the names of the nominees se-
lected by the various organizations
participating in the all-campus elec-
tion on June 1 are now before the eli-
gibility committee and will he an-
nounced probably in time for publica-
ion in. Saturday's issue of The Daily.
Several new innovations in the Cap
Night festivities are planned by the
councilmen this year, but the secrets
will not be disclosed for several days.
Free shows for the near-sophs are
being sought, and it seems likely that
several of the local "movie" houses
will turn over their second shows to
the underclassmen.
Tl'e matter of assessing the two un-
derclasses for damage to the tug-of-
war rope, which was cut in several
places after the pushball contest last
Saturday morning, was discussed, but
no definite action was taken pending
an investigation of the damage done
and the cost to repair the rope.
SENIORS FAVOR ANGELL FUND
Would Viaee Series of Tablets in New
1.ibrary ilding
Following the recommendation of
the senior memorial committee, a reso-
lution was adopted at the senior lit
elass meeting yesterday afternoon fa-
voring the proposed James B. Angell
memorial, fund and the placing of a
series of memorial tablets in the main
room of the new library building. The
class also voted to do away with the
senior banquet for the current year.
A motion proposed by the women of
the class that the Women's Athletic
association be given a sum of class
money proportional to that set aside
for men's athletics was tabled until
the next meeting. Due to the fact that
few members of the class were pres-
ent the election of alumni representa-
tives was postponed until a later
mneting.
SOPiI ENGINEERIS TO HIkVE
lOW-WOW TOMORROW NIGhT
The soph engineers will finish
their social events of the year w#h
their annual pow-wow at Cascade
Glen tomorrow night. Prof. W. D.
Henderson and Prof. R. 1H. Stevens,
both of the engineering department.
will give snappy speeches.
The class will meet at the Michi-
gan Central depot promptly at 7:30
o'clock, from where the men will
march to the glen. Tickets at 15
cents each may be obtained from any
of the committee.

New York, May 25.--Arthur War-
ren Waite, as coolly as if he were
discussing the weather, told the jury
in the criminal branch of the supreme
court tonight, how he had caused the
death of Mrs. John E. Peck by bac-
teria, how he had poisoned and then
smothered John E. Peck, and then how
he had tried to kill Miss Katherine
Peck, the aged sister of his father-
in-law.
As he spoke hardly above a confi-
dential tone, and perfectly at his ease,
the court room, from which women had
been excluded after 8:00 o'clock in the
evening, was as still as death. Jurors,i
wearied by the long session, sat bolt
upright, or leaned forward to catch
every word.9
The supreme moment of the wit-
ness' testimony on the stand came an3
hour after the session had convened.
Then in reply to questions of Walter
R. Deuel, following his confession of
his attempt to destroy Mrs. Peck, he
said in a surprised tone, "Why, I
wanted those bacteria to kill these
three persons, Mr. Peck, Mrs. Peck,
and Miss Peck, the maiden aunt."
GOOLEY TALKS TO ENGINEERS
peaks to Both Seniors and Juniors
at Class Assemblies<
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley spoke to
both the senior and junior engineer-
ing class> assemblies yesterday. The
subject of the dean's talk to both class-..
es was the same and was concerningt
the advantages of acquiring a personalt
discipline from military training.
"There are two sides to a man's na
ture," declared the dean, "the social
and the official, and they should never<
be mixed. You young gentlemen know
only the first side. This great coun-
try of ours knows only the first side..
We have no organization that instillsc
into us the idea of personal discipline.
"When you young men get out of
school, learn to receive and accept an
order without any personal heat or
resentment. Keep the two sides of
your nature distinct and separate from
each other. When you give an order
never say 'please'. I can't conceive
of the word 'please' except when you
want a favor."
WHAT'S GOING_ON
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity-Unsettled, probably showers.
TODAY
5:00 o'clock-Meeting of junior civilJ
engineers, room A, surveying building.'
7:00 o'clock--Fresh engineers meet1
for Pow-Wow, Ferry field gate.
7:00 o'clock--Alpha Nu meets, club
rooms, U-hall.
7:15 o'clock-J-engineers leave M. C.
station for Cascade Glen.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of A. I. E. I1.
room 229, Engineering building.
7:45 o'clock-Senior engineering
sing, senior engineering benches.
TOMORROW
10:00 o'clock-Interclass track meet,
Ferry field.
3:00 o'clock-State Normal club
meets at bandstand for picnic.
3:00 o'clock-All Fresh vs. Ypsilanti
Normal college baseball game. Ferry
field.
7:3) o'clock-Soph engineers meet
for Pow-Wow, M. C" station.
S :3 o'clock-Union dance, Barbour
gym.
9:00 o'clock--University dance,
P aechard academy.

fDr. WaiteTakes
His Trial Col

Says IDeliberately 'Itint
Bacteria to Kill
Three Peeks

le WntA
tile

PREMIER ASQUITH
MAES STATEMENT
CONCERNING IRISH
EAGERLY AWAITED ANNOUNCE-
E.N.T.CAUSES LPRESS-
l'E SCENE
WANTS DISCUSSION QUIETED
D)ebate Reveals Large Extent of Ar-
rests Made During Be-
bellion
London, May 25.-One of the most
impressive scenes in the House of
Commons since the beginning of the
war occurred this afternoon when
Premier Asquith made his eagerly
awaited statement on Ireland. The
premier's few words were delivered
amid the most profound silence, the
sole interruption coming when the
sensational announcement was made
that Mr. Lloyd-George would negotiate
the settlement.
The announcement was greeted with
warm approval from all sides. There
was not a dissenting voice or a pro-
test when the premier, instead of mak-
ing the sensational disclosures ex-
pected, in a calm, quiet voice urged
the members in the interest of the
whole country to abstain from a dis-
cussion of Ireland at the present time.
"Discussion," he said, "cannot be
effective, or even fruitful, before the
conclusion of the inquiries now pro-
ceeding. This government's primary
duty is to restore order. We hope that
the disappearance of martial law will
be speedy and complete."
An idea of the extent of the arrests
in Ireland was revealed during the
debate, when membe s seeking inform-
ation regarding the status of constitu-
ents drew from the under secretary for
war the statement that 150 cases were
being disposed of daily, and that the
government expected to finish all of
these within 10 days.
WEB AND FLANGE ELECTS NINE
Senior Engineering Honorary Society
Holds Initiation Banquet
Web and Flange, senior engineering
honorary society, held its spring in-
itiation and banquet last night. The
men who were picked from the ju-
nior engineering class are C. M.
Burns, R. H. Cady, R. W. Collins, D.
M. Drake, H. R. Leach, R. L. MNa-
mee, H. A Ta ylor and J. L. Whalen.
Prof. H. W. King of the engineering
faculty was elected an honorary mem-
ber of the society.
At the banquet held after the in-
itiation J. K. Norton, '16E, acted as
toastmaster and talks were given by
L.. C. Rowley, '16E, Prof. H. E. Riggs,
Prof. H. W. King and Prof. C. T.
Johnston.
SHELF OF BOOKS IN LIBRARY
DEVOTED TO SUBJ CTS OF WAR
The lower shelf of the red star case
in the general library has been de-
voted to books on war. Among the col-
lection are books on the army and
navy, recent publications on the Eu-
ropean conflict, books on military
strategy, and recent reports of the sec-
retary of war. A number of other
volumes of unusual interest will be

added in the course of the next week.
Senior Sig Postponed to 7:45 o'Clock
Postponement of the senior engi-
neering sing from 7:00 o'clock to 7:45
o'clock this evening has been an-
nounced by the committee. The change
in time was made so that there would
be no conflict with the band concert.
The sing will take place at the senior
benches near the engineering arch.

Engineering Profession Bears a
Vital Relation to Public Health
0

Michigan's fame as an engineering
school makes it more than appropriate
that in this series of articles about
the relation of the professions to pub-
lic health the profession of the engi-
neer should receive early attention.
The engineer, like the man in any
other profession, can have a broad or
narrow view of this movement. If
he holds the view that the burden of
the responsibility for keeping well
rests upon the individual and not upon
the community, he will not pay much
attention to the health aspects of the
work his profession touches. But if
he gets the viewpoint that it is-so-
ciety's moral duty to look out for the
health of the people, he will always"
be asking the question, whenever a
new undertaking is launched, "How
will this affect the health of the com-
munity?" or "What can I do to make
this proposed engineering project
make my city a healthier place to
live in"
When a community is about to in-
stall a sewage disposal plant, it is the
engineer who is consulted. His advice
is asked and on his decision will often
depend whether or not a city gets an
adequate plant.
The same thing holds true of all
questions concerning a city's drain-

age, its sewer system, its water sup-
ply, and so on. The engineer who has
a more sensitve regard for the value
of a silver dollar than the value of a
human life can do enormous harm to
the health of the people on the plea
that he is trying to give the city the
cheapest system possible.
In a more general way the same
thing is true of engineers who are not
directly employed by municipalities,
but whose work affects the public
more indirectly. There is hardly any
engineering project that does not in
some way affect the health of a large
number of people. So closely are the
two professions, engineering and pub-
lic health, related, that the one can-
not get along without the other. The
greatest engineering feat this country
has ever engaged in, the building of
the Panama Canal, could not have
been accomplished without broad-
minded health officials. Suppose Gen-
eral Gorgas had taken the position
that it was the business of the men
employed on that job by the govern-
ment to look out for their own health,
what would have become of the canal
project? This is a vivid illustration
of what every engineer can do in a
smaler way.

Hear The S u n r i s e Daughters Quartette
--at-
The Annual Spring Concert
-of--
The Girls Glee Club
Saturday, May 27
Sarah Caswell Angell Hall - - Admission 25c

U-NOTICES
Senior lit baseball practice,
veld, 3:30 o'clock.

Ferry

The

GRAND

CH AR TY

BAZAA K-

.At the NEW ARMORY, cor. 5th Ave. and Ann 'rt. Forthe bnfto esa n uto
Hungarian Wiows and Orphans
Original and Interesting Attractions---Musical Features.--Big Prizes Given Away

MATINEES and EVENINGS
Today and Tomorrow

Admission 10 cents

Home Cooked Suppers 25c
From SMI fn 7 xu

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