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May 25, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-25

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TIHE )DAILY
NEWS OF T1E WORLD AND
THE CAMPS
VOL. XXVI. NO. 166.

IGAN
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN; THURSDAY, MAY 25, 1916.

Business 960
Phones :- Editorial 2114
TEI LERAPII SERVICE BY THE
N?:W YORK SUN

PRICE FIVE CENTS

.,
- ___. -

PROF.DA MID FRIDAY
RESIGNS TO TAL
lPOSITION IN EAST
POLITICAL ECONOMY EXPERT
- OES TO NEW YORK
UNIVEiRSITY
ASSUMES NEW PLACE IN FALL
Graduiate of University Recehied A. B.
Degree in 1908; Is Expert
Accoun antnt
Announcement was made yeaterday
that Professor -David Friday, of the
political economy department, has
turned in his resignation to the Board
of Regents, and has accepted a position
as professor of economics in the.
School of Commerce, New York Uni-
versity, New York city. The resigna-
tion is to take effect at the close of
the summer session, and Professor
Friday will assume his new duties at
the opening of the eastern university
in the fall.
Professor Friday is a graduate of
the University of Michigan, having re-
ceived his A. B. degree with the class
of l9A. At the present time he is
president of the Michigan Tax Com-
mission, an organization of promin-
ent businc:s men of the state for the
purpose o investigating and recom
mending -u-Wforms !of taxation to the
state legislature. For a number of
years his services as an expert ac-
countant have been in wide demand.
Since the appointment of the receivers
for the Pere Marquette railroad, he
has done a great deal of work in as-
sistingto put the road on a pay-
ing basis.
Recently Professor Friday was re-
tained by a banker's and trust com-
pany asociation of New York city to
prepare a series of treatises on pro-
posed legislation by the Albany gov-
ernment.
While in the university Professor
Friday has written a number of text
books on accounting problems, some
of whieh are in use by university
classes.

.. _.._
M

Last inute News
Told. in Brie f
InlldJ, 1May 24. --'l'h1e Exdihange
Telegraph says it. learned from diplo-
matic circles that Prince von Buelow,
former German chancellor, is pro-
ceeding to Washington, charged by
Emperor William with a special mis-
Sion.
Paris, May 2.--An Italian shell has
blown up the largest munitions depot
at Roberto and the town is now in
flames, according to a news dispatch
from Rome. Several heavy guns were
destroyed by the explosion.
N ew York, May 24.--Raymond Rob.
ins, of Chicagp, social work and Il-
linois state central committee chair-
man, will be the temporary chairman
of the Progressive national conven-
tion which meets in Chicago on June 7.
El Paso, May 24.-A well defined re-
port had it today that General Fun-
ston has again requested the war de-
partment to call out the national guard
of Louisiana, Oklahoma and Arkan-
sas.
WaslhingtonI, May 24.-The naval
committee laid before the House today
its bill anronriatin $%241.000.000 for

EV1INCE AGAINST '
WAITE INCREASES
Three Women Testify for State in
Case Against Poisoner of
Father-in-Law
ATTORNEY USES NINE WITNESSES
New York, May 24.-Three women,
Elizabeth C. Hardwick, Clara Louise
Peck Waite, the wife, and Margaret
Weaver Horton, the "other woman'
brought the trial of Dr. Arthur War-
ren Waite for the murder of his fa-
ther-in-law, John E. Peck, to a dra-
matic climax today.
Miss Hardwick's part was a minor
one. She was the "K. Adams" whose
telegram had set in action the inves-
tigation which had brought about the
(Continued on Page Six)
MORE MILITIA ORDERED
10 PROCEDTO BORDER
Two Assignments Have Been Given
Out but Will Not Leave Till G
End of Week

i
J
1
i
f
i

S pppp g , ,
navy increases for the coming year. San Antonio, Texas, May 24.-Gen-
This is $91,787,287 more than was eral Funston this afternoon electri-
voted for the navy last year, and the fled the militia camp at Fort Sam
largest appropriation ever made for Houston with orders to proceed to
the American navy. the border as quickly as possible.
Though the men were ready to move
Reno, Nevada, May 24.-Four are soon, it was notwbelievedthe camp
dead and heavy damage has been done would be broken before the end of
to the old Belcher workings of the the week. Only two regimental as-
Yellow Jacket mine of Gold Hill by signments have beeNgiven out; these
a fire that broke out last night. are those of the second regiment which
- -- -goes to Brownsville, and the Fourth
SELECT Al HIETIG CONTROL MEN regiment, which is slated for E!agle
Pass.
Note to Carranza Has Been Sent
New Members of Board Elected to Washington, May 24.-A dispatch
Take Office Next Fall from Special Agent Rodgers said the
- --new Carranza note would reach Am-
The three student members of the bassador Arredondo next Monday, in-
Board in Control of Athletics for the dicating that the messenger had al-
year 1916-1917 have just been elected ready left Mexico City.
by the Board of Directors of the Ath- The 116 members of the Texas na-
letic association, as follows: Edward tional guard who failed to answer the
l, Mack, '17, Earl B. McKinley, '16,- 1 summons for duty on the border may
1iM, and James Thomas, '16. These be given another opportunity. Be-
i-en will take their seats on the cause the new army reorganization
Board at the first meeting in the fall. bill repealed certain provisions of the.

Students Give
Team Send-of f
Musicians% Rouse Crow~d Which Gath
ers; "Morrie" Dunne tive
Speech
Less than 300 students, who made
up in spirit what they lacked in num-
bers, sent Michigan's track team to the
eastern intercollegiates with cheer
after cheer yesterday afternoon.
A crew of musicians started the
small crowd that gathered in front of
University hall, which increased by
the time it had reached the Michigan
Central station. "Bob" Bennett, '18,
led the cheers, while "Morrie" Dunne,
'17L, delivered a peppy speech from
the top of a box car.
The send-off was made up chiefly
of members of the freshman class,
with a few upperclassmen interspersed
here and there in the crowd.
SENIOR RECEPTION 'THIS
YER IFORKALAFFIR
1l3ue Coats and White Flannels to
Constitute Regulation Dress
for June Event
Breaking sharply from the custom of
former yea's, the senior reception to
be held Monday, June 26, will be an
informal affair, and will be held ina
the armory instead of in the com-
bined gymnasiums as heretofore. The
reception will last from 9:00 to 3:00
o'clock..
'Tickets will be strictly limited to
150 couples and will be placed on sale
at $3.00 each on the morning oftJune
5. From the fifth to the ninth the
sale will be restricted to seniors; any.1
tickets then remaining will be avail-i
able to the general campus. A small
number of visitors will be allowed to
pnirchase visitor's tickets.
All arrangements are in the hands
of Philip C. Lovejoy, '16, general
chairman, who announces that the
regulation dress for the evening will
be blue coats and white flannels. As
in previous years, the senior recep-
tion will start off the festivities of
Commencement week and pave the
way for the promenade, the senior
girls' play, and other functions to come
later.
ENGINEER ASSEMBLIES MEET
Seniors, Juniors and Sophomores Meet
iis Morning in Room 48
Final assemblies of tne year for
the senior, junior, and sophomore en-
gineering classes will be held this
morning in room 348, Engineering
building, as follows: 8:00 o'clock, ju-
nior assembly, Dean Cooley, speak-
er; 9:00 o'clock, senior assembly, Dean
Cooley, speaker; 11:00 o'clock, sopho-
more assembly, Dean Bates, speaker.
At these various meetings plans for
the "pow-wows" will be announced and
some action taken in regard to Cap
Night arrangements.
At the sophomore assembly an as-
sessment of 15 cents per person will
be levied to cover current expenses.
Junior engineers are requested to
hand all dues to the class treasurer,
who will be present to receive them.
Woolsack Holds Initiation Tonight
Woolsack will hold its annual
spring initiation and banquet tonight
at 6:00 o'clock at Mack's tea rooms.

Professors E. C. Goddard and T. A.
Bogle will speak in behalf of the law
faculty and J. M. Barrett, '18L, for the
initiates.
Tau Beta Pi to Hold Reception Tonight
Tau Beta Pi, national engineering
honor fraternity, will hold its annual
reception to the members of the fa-
culty and their wives at 8:00 o'clock
tonight at Granger's academy. There
will be a dance immediately following
the reception.

* * * ' * * *

SEI<.iORS !
On Wednesdays and Fridays *
* of every week up to Commence- "
* ment, seniors ought to near *
their caps and gowns on the *
campus. The senior cap and *
gown is an important tradition *
* in any university. If the Swing. *
* Out ceremony is to mean any- *
* thing, the caps and gowns don- *'
ned then should be worn consis- *
* tently between Swing-Out and
* Conminencement. Michigan se- *
niors are urged to keep this
9radition alive, both as a stimumi- *
lus to freshman caps, and as a *
picturesqute addition to campus *t
life.
TRADITIONS COMMITTEE *
. *
TO ANNOUNCE NOMINEES SOON
Election of Memlbers for Four Campus
Organizations lled June 1
Nominees for the various offices to
be filled on Campus Election Day, June
1, will be announced within the nextl
few days. Among the positions to be
filled are those of the student officials
of the athletic association, Michigan
Union, Women's league, Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications, and three
members to the Stuent Council from
the campus at large.
Arrangements for the elections are
being made by Wilson M. Shafer, 't,
of the Student Council.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicinity:
Partly cloudy, probably showers, with
southerly winds.
TO Dot i
S :d o'clock-Junior engineer as-
sembly, 348 Engineering building.
9:00,o'clock-Senior engineer assem-
bly, 348 Engineering building.
11:00 o'clock-Sophomore engineer
assembly, 348 Engineering building.
4 :011 o'clock- Senior lit class meet-
ing in Tappan hall.
4:00 o'clock--Senior lit meeting for
election of alumni officer and decision
on memorial, Tappan hall.
6:00 o'clock---Woolsack initiation
banquet, Mack's Tea Room.
7:00 o'clock-Canadian club smoker
for election of officers, Michigan union.
7::30 o'clock--Prof. W. H. Hobbs
speaks to Intercollegiate Socialist so-
ciety, Newberry hall.
7:30 o'clock - Meeting of Poetry
club for election of officers, 202 South
Wing.
8:00 e'clock--Meeting of Deutscher
Verein for election of officers, rooms,
U-hall.
8:30 o'clock-Spring Party of Catho-
lie Students' club, St. Thomas' hall.
TOMORRO W
7:0 0 o'cloek-Alpha Nu meets, club
;aoms, U-hail.
7:10 o'clock-J-engineers leave M. C.
;,ation for Cascade Glen.j
U- NOTICE S
Michigan i ::dernmal club . will
hold a picnic Saurday afternoon north
:f the Observatory. -ll alumni meet
at bandstand at 3:00 o'clock.
Sopli .eKrace'.s I'e to ay their dacs
sis mo1nin'. A table will be placed
n th musa hall ot 1he Emri eoriog;
bailding and all members of the class
are urged to a their caes at this
I me.-

; * * *;

GERMANS RETAKE FORT DOVUM'ONT
AND OCCUPY CUMIERES BY VIOLENT
ATTACKS ON BOTH SIDES OF MEUSE

FRESH WlVARIAN 1IVISIONS ARE
EMPFLOYED AGAINST
FORT
MAKE CONTINUOUS ASSAULTS
Terrain Surrounding Fort Still Held
by French in Face of
Flanking Attacks
Paris, May 24.--As the result of a
continuous attack on both sides of
the Meuse last night and today the
Germans have won to notable suc-
cesses at the expenditure of a great
number of men. In the fighting to
the east of Le Mort Homme on the
left bank of the river they occupied
the village of Cumieres and took a
trench between the village and Le
Mort Homme. This afternoon on the
east bank,- Fort Douaumont, which
the French recaptured Monday, was
retaken by the Germans.
The retaking of the fort was the re-
sult of the concentration of repeated
attacks of the most desperate charac-
ter against this one point. Two Ba-
varian divisions which were brought
to the Verdun front only recently
were employed against the fort. The
bombardment of this sector had con-
tinued without interruption sincenthe
French took the position and had in-
creased in violence particularly this
afternoon when the already tremen-
dous expenditures of ammunition were
doubled. Even then the first attack,
made without counting the cost in
men, broke down under the French
fire, but the effort was repeated until
at last they again occupied the fort,
long since only a mass of ruins, but
(Continimed on Page Six)
19 Engineers Hold 'Pow-wow' Tonight
Prof. H. C. Sadler, Mr. O. C. Marck-
wardt and Dr. W. D. Moriarty, of the
Engineering Department, will be the
speakers and the "chaperons" at the
fresh engineer "pow-wow" tonight.
The "pow-wow" will be held on
grounds somewhere to the south of
the golf links, where "eats" and
"smokes" will also be served. 'T. C.
Garrett and C. W. Page as cheer lead-
ers will work up class "pep". All
fresh engineers are requested to be
at the Ferry field entrance promptly
at 7:00 o'clock tonight.
Dlaly ('orrects Error' Made Tluesday
Through an unfortunate mistak In
judgment The Daily published last
Tuesday an article on the alleged dis-
covery of a new method of making
Salvarsan in the chemical laboratory.
It now appears that the article was
misleading in many particulars, and
in others contrary to the' facts. The
Daily regrets having published the ar-
ticle and trusts that those who have
read it will help in checking the false
impression that it created.
Shields Talks to Woodrow Wilson Club
At the initial rally held last evening
in Newberry hall, the Woodrow Wilson
club organized and elected the follow-
ing officers: President, E. O. Snethen,
18L; vice-president, C. K. Patterson,
'17; suecretary, J. P. Colden, '18L;
treasurer, E. H. Heimann, '18.,
Edward Shields, '96L, chairman of
the state central committee, gave the
principal address of the evening."
Senior Lits to Choose Representatives
Three alumni representatives from
the senior lit class will be chosen at
a meeting of the class to be held at
4:00 o'clock this afternoon in Tappan
hall. The question of the senior me-
murial will also come up for discits-
sion and some definite action will be
taaen. All the unfinished business of
I the year will be cleared from the table.

-0
La/vyer 's Share in the Public
Health fMovement Important One

The relation of the lawyer to pub- health offi
lic health is not as obvious as that who refus
of the physician, discussed in yester- that will h
day's article of this series, but it is a munity in
close one nevertheless. A young m~an health prof
leaves the univet-sity with a law ,dip- Later a
loma and hangs out his shingle in a l c
small town. Nine times out of 10 he pic hea
soon makes the race for justice of the isbsovtaI
peace, and during the early years of life that t
his career, when the cases are com- lifficer
paratively few, he holds this office and ing casesri
draws what fees he can from it. opportuni
opportumit
Here his connection with public
health begins. The local health of-
fleer is perhaps zealous about secur-
Ing and keeping a pure milk supply
for his community. He has the usual
troubles that are to be met with in
connection with getting milkmen to
keep clean dairies and to live up to
the local milk ordinance. In many
cases the dairymen obey the order of
the health officer, but there are usually
a few who can be brought into line
only by force.1
The health 'officer is compelled to
have the recalcitrant milkmen arrest-
ed. They are brought before the young
justice of -the peace and from that
point he has it in his power either to
retard the great public health move-
ment in his community orto advance
it. If he has gained a broad vision
of the relation of morality to health,
of the essential criminality of selling
dirty milk which kills defenseless
babes, he will co-operate with the R. 1V

cer and make the milkmen
e to keep clean an example
help to ;Aeep the whole com-
Sthenvanguard of public
)paganda.k
s prosecuting attorney he
tantly run up against the
ilth problems. Public health
y connected with community
he attorney, both as a pub-
and as an attorney plead-
in court, will have constant
ty to make his influence felt.

existing militia laws under which the
men could be court-martiallet, Sec-
retary Baker has determined to delay
action until the new measure becomes
a law. Secretary Baker will ask the
President to issue a supplementary
call for the 116 guardsmen as soon as
the bill is signed. This would operate
to enroll them as federal soldiers for
service within the United States sub-
ject to severe penalties for refusal to
report for duty.-
GALENS INITIATES FIVE MEN
I)r.. ido Wile and Dr. A. W. Hewlett
Speak at Ranquet
Galens, upper class medical society,
held its initiation and banquet last
night. The neophytes are: E. R.
Smith, '18M, H. E. Barrows, '19M, T.
L. Tolan, '19M, H. G. Lundgren, '19M,
and G. R. Crieve, '19M.
The banquet was held at the Renel-
len Hospice and the principal speak-
ers were Dr. Udo J. Wile and Dr. A.
W. Hewlett, both of the Medical school.
Council to Swear in New 31embers
Newly elected councilmen from the
various classes will be sworn in at
a, meeting of the student council at
7:15 o'clock tonight in the council
room in the north wing of University
hall.
Few Tickets Left for Boat Club Dance
A few remaining tickets for the Boat
club dance to be staged next Monday
evening in Barbour gymnasium will
be placed on sale at the Michigan
Union at 4:00 o'clock this afternoon.

WILLIAM IDE KLEI NE

I I Hear Those Features From the Western Tour

Hill
Auditorium

T RIP

CO

CERT

Thursday
June1

25 Cents

Glee and Mandolin Club

5 cents

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