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May 24, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-24

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THE DAILY
50c
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

t

m-s

Phones -Editorial 2414
Business 960
I'EILEARAPH SERVICE BY
NEW YORK SUN

THE

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 1916.

cTnT 'V V't7T . AT- 1 PIP

I

VOL. XXVI. No. 165.

WOLVERINE TRICK
ARTISTS PRACTICE
FOR FINAL TIME
CAPT. SMITH, UFER, FOX, GRIEST,
AND MURPHY MAKE FINAL
APPEARANCE
PLAN BIG SEND-OFF FOR TEAM
"Morry" Dinne to Address Rooters at
Depot; "Bob" Bennett Leads Yells;
Band to Be There
Coach Farrell yesterday put his in-
tercollegiate squad through their final
workout of the season.
In addition to the fact that it was
the last chance for the team to appear
on Ferry field, the curtain fell after
the workout was over on several of
the Maize and Blue's best bets. Six
of the number that the coach will take
with him this afternoon have made
their, last appearance on Ferry field
to compete under Michigan colors. Of
this number are Captain, Smith, Ufer,
Fox, Griest, and Murphy.
Because of the best weather which
the track team has been favored with
this year, the coach gave his men the
opportunity of extending themselves
as much as they desired. Among those
to get in some good licks in the finale
was "Eddie" Carroll. The distance
runner was clocked around the quar-
ter-mile track three times in 3 min-
utes and 12 seconds.
"Steve" stated yesterday that he
would let the whole team rest tomor-
row afternoon. This decision means
that the men will not don spiked shoes
(Continued on Page Six)
STUART PERRY SPEAKS TODAY
Editor of Adrian Telegram to Talk on
Country Editorials
Stuart H. Perry, editor of the Adrian
Telegram, will speak at 4:00 o'clock
this afternoon in room 202, West hall.
His subject will be on the writing of
editorials for a country newspaper.
The public is invited to attend the lec-
ture.
Mr. L. L. Bryson's classes in jour-
nalism will be excused for the day.

Fraternity Plans
To Support Child
Chi Psi to Adopt Fatherless French
War Baby in Near
Future
Following the movement started by
the University of Chicago fraternities
to adopt French war orphans, the lo-
cal chapter of the Chi Psi fraternity
has decided to take over the support
of one of the fatherless French chil-
dren.
This will be done by sending funds
to the French society that takes charge
of the work. But half of the cost of
supporting the child will be paid by
the fraternity. The French govern-
ment will pay the rest of the expense
of maintaining every child so support-
ed.
.The matter of having . all local
Greek letter organizations adopt
French war orphans .will be brought
up at the next meeting of the frater-
nity conference. Chi Psi is the first
local fraternity to follow the plan
started at Chicago.
Archons Initiate
11 Yearling Laws
Banquet Follows, with Talks by Prof.
Evans Holbrook of Law School'
and Members
Archons, junior law society, held its
initiation yesterday afternoon. The
following men were picked from the
present fresh law class: James M.'
Barrett, James H. Cartwright, James
B. Comstock, Glen M. Coulter, Donald
A. Finkbeiner, John A. Heist, George
F. Hurley, James W. Thomas, S. Kram-
er, William S. Kammerer and Ben-
jamin S. Motter.
The initiation banquet followed and
was held at Mack's Tea Room. Fer-
ris Fitch, '17L, was the toastmaster.
The speakers were: D. W. Sessions,
'17L, D. A. Finkbeiner, '18L, Prof.
Evans Holbrook of the law depart-
ment,. and T. H. Tapping, '16L.
Verein Members to Hold Dance
The Deutscher Verein is to hold a
dance at Barbour gymnasium next
Friday night at 8:00 o'clock. The
dance will be for members and a few
friends who have been invited. Ar-
rangements have been made to enter-
tain those who do not dance.

DEAN VAUGHAN ON.
STAND IN TRIAL
Testifies With Other Experts That
John Peck Met Death
by Arsenic

DR., WAITE FACES HARD

DA i

New York, May 23.-That John E.
Peck came to his death as the result
of the heavy doses of arsenic found in
his organs after death, was the un-
qualified testimony in the Waite trial
today of Dr. Victor C. Vaughan, dean
of the medical school of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, and other experts
who conducted the autopsy or analysis
of the contents of those organs.
The poison was found in large quan-
tities every place in which it was
sought, and there were further evi-
dences of chloroform in the brain.
The testimony summed up showed that
about seven grains had been indicated
altogether, and two and half grains
constitute a lethal dose.
The state today finished with the
evidence to prove that Mr. Peck was
put to death by his son-in-law, Dr.
Arthur Warren Waite, and by adjourn-
ment time at nightfall everything had
been made ready for a day of sensa-
tions scheduled to begin tomorrow. At
tomorrow's session, the tall, slender,
indifferent prisoner, on trial for his
life, will find confronting him first
his wife, Myra T. Waite, then Margar-
et Weaver Horton, the "other woman,"
Percey Peck, his brother-in-law, per-
haps his aunt-in-law, Mrs. Catherine
Peck, and some time during the day
(Continued on Page Six)
TO DISCUSS MILITARY STUDIES
Prof. J. H. Rowen to Address '19 Engi-
neer Assembly This Morning
Prof. J. H. Rowen, of the mechanical
engineering department, will discuss
the new group of military and naval
studies that may be added to the cur-'
riculum of the Engineering College
next fall, at the fresh engineer assem-
bly today at 11:00 o'clock, in room 348,
Engineering building. Professor Row-
en will speak of the courses now given
at West Point and Annapolis, and
compare them with the courses that
may be added here.
PRESCOTT CLUB ELECTS
OFFICERS AND hAS FEED
Prescott club, of the school of phar-
macy, elected the following officers
for next year at a meeting held last
evening: President, M. W. Tomlin
'17P; vice-president, Mary E. Dunlap
'18P; secretary, C. G. Fuss, '19P; trea-
surer, W. S. Revens, '17P; reporter
L. C. Heustis, '17P. After a series
of short talks by faculty men, the
year's activities were brought to a
close by a feed prepared by the women
of the society.
Adelphi Elects Officers for Semester
Election of officers for the Adelph
House of Representatives for the firs
semester of next year were announce
last night following a business meet
ing of the society. The following me
were chosen: Speaker, Ralph M. Par
sons, '17; clerk, Jess R. Simpson, '1;
treasurer, A. R. Levine, '18; sergeant
at-arms, B. F. Magruder, '18; oratori
cal delegate, 1. S. Toplon, '17.

TKES ACTION ON
ENTERTAI1NM ENTS
University Senate Publishes List of
Approved Events; Others Must
le "Manifestly Desirable"
READ LETTERS ON DR. ANGELL
Exact definition of what constitutes
recognized entertainments at the uni-
versity was made at the meeting of
the University Senate held last night
in the Law building. The Senate ad-
opted the following resolutions at the
recommendation of the committee on
student affairs:
"Resolved,
"I. That the Senate recognizes the
following permitted entertainments:
the annual plays of the Comedy club,
the Deutscher Verein, the Cercle Fran-
cais, the Junior Girls', the Senior Girls',
the Oratorical association, and mas-
ques, the opera given by the Mimes of
the University of Michigan, the bien-'
nial pageant of the Women's league,
and concerts of the musical clubs,
the band, and the Girls' Glee club.
"I That it is the sense of the Sen-
ate that the committee on student af-
fairs should authorize no additional
entertainments that are not manifest-
ly desirable and worthy of the univer-
versity's support."
Letters regarding the life and in-
fluence of the late President-Emeritus
James B. Angell were read from the
faculty of the University of Pittsburg
and from the faculty of Michigan Agri-
cultural College. A special meeting
of the University Senate will be held
on next Monday evening.
POW WOW SLATED FOR FRIDAY
J-Engineers Select Cascade Glen for
Scene of Yearly Event
For the third time in as many years
Cascade Glen has been selected as the
scene of the annual J-engineer pow-
wow. The time has been set for Fri-
day night, May 26. Prof. B. F. Bailey,
of the electrical engineering depart-
inent, and Frank H. Stevens, assistant
professor of mechanical engineering,
will deliver addresses to the engineers,
and eats and smokes will complete
the program.
All junior engineers are requested
to meet at 7:15 o'clock at the Michi-
gan Central station Friday evening
from whence the party will proceed
to the scene of the evening's festiv-
ities.
Tickets may be secured at 15c eac
from any of the following.committee-
men: General chairman, John V. Kui-
vinen; eats committee, Gordon Camp-
- bell, Roger Birdsell; fire committee
I. B. Clark; program, B. A. Stenberg;
finances and tickets, J. H. Otis.
COUNCILMEN TO BE SWORN
n THURSDAY; HATCH ELECTEI
Howard S. Hatch was elected stu
i dent councilman by the soph lits a
t their meeting held yesterday. Th
d newly elected councilmen from th
- various classes will be sworn in a
n the meeting of the council on Thurs
- day night in the north wing of uni
versity hall at 7:15 o'clock.
Donald W. Sessions, '17L, was elect
- ed student councilman for next yea
from the junior law class.

.engineers ' Song
WBook Out Today
Limited to Senior Engineers Duringu
First Three Days; Copyright
Trouble Adjusted
"Morphine Bill and Cocaine Sue,"
"The Twenty-Pound Dog," "The In-'
dian Kid." "Mountain Dew," and "The
Tavern in the Town" are some of the
more famous of the 35 songs to be
found in the Senior Engineer Song
Book which goes on sale at noon to-
day at the University Music store.
On Wednesday, Thursday and Fri-
day the sale will be open to '16 engi-
neers only. After that time the re-
maining copies will be offered to the
campus at large. Trouble concerning
the copyright of several of the songs
has delayed the publication. An ad-
justment has finally been reached be-
tween the senior engineering class,
Mrs. M. M. Root of the University Music
store, and the Hinds, Noble and Ed-
ridge company.
Wilson Boomers
To Smoke Tonight
Ed. C. Shields, Chairman of Democratic
State Central Committee, and Prof.
Bunker Among Speakers
The Woodrow Wilson club will give
d smoker tonight in ,Newberry hall:
immediately after the senior sing. Ed.
C. Shields; '96L, chairman of the
Democratic state central committee,
will be the principal speaker of the
evening.
Prof. R. E. Bunker of the Law depart-
ment, Postmaster Abbot, W. L. Walsh,
and ex-Prosecuting 'Attorney George
Burke will also address the audience.
There will be plenty of "smokes" and
the Hawaiian quartet will furnish lots
of good music. No admission will be
charged and everyone interested in
politics is urged to be present.

PRICE FIVE CENTS
GERMNSFAIL IN
EFFrORT TO EGI
LND NEAR MEUSE
TERRIFIC FIGHTING CONTINUES
DURING LAST 24 HOURS
IN VERDUN SECTOR
FRENCH SUCCESS UNCHECKED'
Teutons Make Use of Liquid Fire in
Struggle at Douaumont; Lose All'
but Northeast Corner
Paris; May 23.-Terrific fighting con-
tinued throughout last night and today
in the Verdun sector, where the Ger-
mans are seeking to recover the
ground gained by the French on both
banks of the Meuse yesterday. None
of the German counter attacks won
any permanent success, according to
the communications issued today, and
the Germans, who lost the southern
part of Fort Douaumont yesterday,
have now been pushed into the north-
east 'corner of the fort, while the rest
is in French hands.
The German batteries on the west
bank of the Meuse concentrated an un-
usually heavy bombardment with large
caliber shells this morning on the
French lines to the west of - Le Mort
Homme. The bombardment was con-
tinued with the same violence all this
(Continued from Page One)
Regent Bulkley of Detroit Supports
Move to Raise $100,000
for Building
FINANCE PROJECT IN DETROIT
Regent H. C. Bukley, of Detroit,
has come to the support of the move-
ment for aunit of field artillery, at
the University of Michigan by ex-
pressing the opinion that the $100,-
000 necessary for an armory for such
an aggregation can be raised among
"preparedness" advocates in Detroit
and other parts of Michigan.
Provided the necessary financial
- aid is secured, the armory would be
similar to that recently constructed at
- Yale. Plans of this building have been
forwarded to the University of Michi-
.gan.
With reference to the housing of A
field battery unit during the erectior
of a permanent armory, Prof. W. H
- Hobbs, who is interested in the mat-
. ter, stated:
b "To properly house the full equip
ment (four guns, 12 caissons, batter
wagon, and store wagon), togethe:
with tents, mess-kits, blankets, etc.
~ would cost about $2500 upon the basi
of rough estimates made on the as
r sumption that 12 stables not now i
n se and located in the enclosure be
longing to, the university and north o
r the chemical building could be used
n.
r * * * * * * * *
s, *

t ~.-....-I

It

WHAT'S GOING ONV

I

_I

Jiodern Doctor Just Be Jiore Than
Dispenser Of Pills And -Medicine

Next to the practitioner of public
health, the doctor comes into closest
contact with the present day move-
ment in society for the elimination of
preventable disease. "Preventive medi-
cine" is the modern slogan, that neces-
sarily means more to the physician
than to the general public.
There are several ways of being a
doctor and there are various standards
of success in the profession. A physi-
cian may be a mere pill and medicine
dispenser, a setter of fractured bones.
He may be very successful at this, and
he may make a great deal of money.
Or a man may be a great specialist
and become an authority in his par-
ticular line. Or he may become a
great medical scientist and go in for
original research work. Whichever
special line of endeavor the man who
is now studying medicine will follow,
must depend to a large extent on
temperament and natural leanings.
One, who has the making in him of a
great surgeon or of a great brain spe-
cialist would not be serving society
best by going against that natural
bent and following the work of the
public health propagandist.
But the medical student whose pref-
erences lead him into the work of the
general practitioner can hardly do
better than to hitch his life work on to
the great public health movement that
is constantly increasing in volume and

in intensity. If he measures the suc-
cess of his work by the way in which
that work advances the public health
movement in his particular commun-
ity he will be applying a standard
that is broad and that makes for
growth.
The state of Michigan needs doctors
of this kind. It needs physicians who
shall be public health leaders in their
communities, who shall leave behind
them in each home they visit profes-
sionally a knowledge of how to pre-
vent disease, or how to live sanely and
wisely, who shall be on the board of
control of the local anti-tuberculosis
society, who shall back up health
movements of all kinds in their com-
munities. The ignorance of a large
mass of the people in regard to disease
and its causes is still monumental even
in Michigan. The state health workers
are finding that out right along in the
present state-wide tuberculosis survey.
The mayor of a city of-35,000 the other
day based an argument against a
county tuberculosis survey on the as-
sertion that tuberculosis is hereditary
and hence can't be cured!' And there
are scores of thousands of people who
have no conception of what the word
"germ"' means, nor that dirt and dis-
ease are related. The medical pro
fession has unusual opportunity tc
help change all this.

Weather for Ann Arbor and vicinity:
Partly cloudy, with moderate south-
westerly winds.
TODAY
2:00 o'clock-Track team send-off.
Michigan Central depot.
4:00 o'clock-Stuart H. Perry of the
Adrian Telegram, speaks to the jour-
nalism classes, room 202, West hall.
7:00 o'clock-Band rehearsal, Uni-
versity hall.
7:00 o'clock-Senior Sing, bandstand
7:30 o'clock-Election of officers an
smoker of Keystone club, Michigar
Union.
7:30 o'clock-Forestry club meet
ing, club rooms, New Science building
7:30 o'clock-Woodrow Wilson clul
smoker, Newberry hall.
TOMORROW
4:00 o'clock-Senior lit class meet
ing in Tappan hall.
4:00 o'clock-Senior lit meeting fo
election of alumni officer and dectsioi
on memorial, Tappan hall.
7:00 o'clock-Canadian club smoke
for election of officers, Michigan union
8:00 oe'lock-Meeting of Deutsche
Verein for election of officers, rooms
U-hall.
7:30 o'clock -- Meeting of Poetr
club for election of odicers, 202 Sout
inp.
U-NOTICES
All women who have offered t
help at the Grand Charity bazaa
kindly report at the new armory, We
nesday afternoon.
Officers' Drill corps will assemb
at 7:30 o'clock tonight on Ferry fiel
Large attendance desired.
All miemubers of the University ban
will meet at University hall at 2:(
o'clock for the track team send-of
All seniors are requested to atten
their classes attired in caps and gown
today.

r
.0

Girls Glee Club
Annual Spring Concert
Saturday, May 27
Sarah Caswell Angell Hall

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* FACTS ABOUT THE SEND-
OFF
* Time-2:00 o'clock.
* Place-In front of U-hall.
Idea-A send-off for Michi-..
* gan's track team. The band
will be there. Students led by
* the band will march down State
street to the Michigan Central
* depot. "Morry" Dunne will be
* there to speak. "Bob" Bennett
will hand out the "pep" from
* the top 'of a freight car.
* Are you a Mielgan man? If
* so, COME OUT.
* * * * * * * * * * * *

Admission 25c

Dancing Follows

0 i

The

GRAND

CHARITY

AZAAK

COMMENCING hARNEWORY,, ' ve.Am' For the bzmieift of German and Au~tro-
," at the NEW AR RYcor.th Ave. and Ann St. FHugarian Widows and Orphans
Original and Interesting Attractions=--Musical Features---Big Prizes Given Away

MAY 24, 25, 26 and 27
MATINEES: Thur., Fri., Sat.

Admission 10 cents

Supper 25c
From 5:30 to 7p. m.

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