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June 04, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-06-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

B-0-0-S-TI
C"-I-G-.ANl-!

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t

No 179.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. FRIDAY, JUNE 4, 1:15.

_ __,__

PENTATHLON OPENS
WITH 21ENTRAWNTS
-New Event Makes First BOw to Cam.
pus with Large Entry List in
Various Cinder
Events
RECORD PERFORMANCE STOPPED
BY POOR CONDITION OF FIELD
C. )I. Graven and W. T. Adams Are
among Highest Men in First
Day Preliminaries
Michigan's, first annual Pentathlon
opened yesterday with 21 men entered
in the events. The poor condition of
the field prevented any exceptional
records being made.
First place in both the shot-put and
the 220 sprint went to C. M. Graven,
'17. In the broad jump, however, he
landed only 14th place, and his total
of points ties him with three others for
third place.
W. T. Adams, '17, by taking fourth in
the shot-put, third in the sprint, and
third in the broad jump, kept his total
of points down to 10, and leads the
field as a result of the first day's
events.
Starting at 4:15 o'clock today the.
high jump and mile rim will be stag-
ed, completing the meet.
The summaries of yesterday's events
follow. The names are arranged in
the order in which the men now stand'
in the meet, and the position in which
each man finished in each event is giv-

TODAY
Gargoyle out at noon.
Baseball-Michigan vs. Notre Dame,
Ferry field, 4:05 o'clock.
Women's League June party, Barbour
gymnasium, 8:30 o'clock.
Round-up dance at Union, 8:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Baseball-Michigan vs. Notre Dame,
Ferry field, 2:30 o'clock.
Union membership dance, 9:00 o'clock.
DRAMA LEAGUE GIVES PLAYLETS
Undergraduates Take Leading Roles in
Final Verformances
Drama league will present three one
act playlets at 8:15 o'clock tonight in
the Whitney theater. In one of the
plays, "A Marriage Has Been Ar-
ranged," Earl Ross, '15, is a million-
aire who declines to marry his Lady
Aline, and there is an interesting
scene at the close of the playlet in
which each finds a suitable mate for
the other.
The other two plays which will be
given by the league tonight ,are, "A
Gentle Jury," and "Tradition." Tick-
ets for the play may be secured at
Wahr's book store for 25 cents.
COP CAMPUS TITLE

Adams, '17, shot-put, fourth, sprint,
third, broad jump, third, total--10;
Martin, '15, shot-put, third, sprint,
eighth, broad jump, second, total-iS;
Graven, '17, shot-put, first, sprint, first,
broad jump, fourteenth, total-16;
Bradbeer, '17, shot-put, seventh, sprint,
seventh, broad jump, second, total-
16; Vedder, pharm. spec., shot put,
sixth, sprint, ninth, broad jump, first,
total-16; Martens, '16, shot-put, sec-
ond, sprint, ninth, broad jump, fifth,
total-16; Stevens, '16L, shot-put,
twelfth, sprint, second, broad jump,
tenth, total-24; Hildner, '17, shot-put,
sixth, sprint, eleventh, broad jump,
eighth, total-25; Henkel, '18, shot-put,
fifth, sprint, tenth, broad jump,
twelfth, total-27; Russell, '171E), shot-'
put eighth, sprint, ninth, broad jump,
eleventh, total-28; Nelson, '18, shot-
put, tenth, sprint, sixth, broad jump,?
thirteenth, total-29; Lamoreaux, '16L,
shot-put, eighth, sprint, twelfth, broad
jump, ninth, total-29; Dillon, '17,
shot-put thirteenth, sprint, tenth,broad
jump, seventh, total-30; .Kohr, '17,
shot-put, eleventh, sprint, fourth,broad1
jump, sixteenth, total-31; Shartel, '18,
shot-put, fourteenth, sprint, eleventh,l
broad jump, sixth, total-31; Hyman,
'17, shot-put, tenth, sprint, fifth, broad
jump, seventeenth, total-32; Johnson,t
'18, shot-put, eighteenth (three fouls),
sprint, thirteenth, broad jump, fourth,
total-35; Sternberger, '15, shot-put,
ninth, sprint, fourteenth, broad jump,
fifteenth, total-38;, Simpson, '17E,
shot-put sixteenth, sprint, seventh,
broad jump, eighteenth, total-41;
Hoerner, '18, shot-put, fifteenth, sprint,
eleventh, broad jump, eighteenth, to-
tal-44; Alden, '18, shot-put, seven-
teenth, sprint, fourteenth, broad jump,I
fourteenth, total-45. I

Barristers Foree First Year Men
Submit to Overwhlellming
Defeat

to

12 FROSII RECEIVE NUMERALS
In a well played game, considering
the wet grounds, the junior law base-
ball team fought its way to the cham-
pionship of the campus by defeating
the fresh lits in a 12 to 7 battle. Be-
cause of the heavy rains of previo'us
days errors were frequent and the
play as a whole was slow.
In the first inning, things opened
up in an interesting way, and the
laws threatened to sew up the game,
but the lits got together and stopped
the laws with a lead of two runs. In
the second half, the yearlings 'caused
a* big scare, and shoved three runs
over. In the third, fourth and sixth
rounds, the laws counted heavily and
walloped the ball enough to assure
them victory in any game.
Brownell and Rowan did the heavy
hitting for the laws, while Sharp and
Reem wielded the bat in the best
shape for the yearlings. The names
of those who received their numerals
are as follows: Sharpe, Reem, Riley,
Lambert, Ohlmacher, Loeb, Perry,
Waller, Britton, C. Martin, Hatch,
Huss. These men are to report to the
Ferry field house tomorrow to be
measured for sweaters. The score and

BOARD TO DISCUSS
PROFESSIONALISM
Likely That Agitation on Campus WIll
Receive Entire Attention
of l eentors
l1AlEIVI AU''iO I PR(11 I
To consider the baseball situatic n
which has arisen at Michigan, a spe-
cial meeting of the board of control of
the athletic association will be held
tomorrow. It is probable that a dis-
cussion of the recent agitation will oc-
cupy the entire time of the board. De-
cisive action will likely be taken on
the matter.
FE SHMIEN DISCUSSION GROUPS
FEATURE1 "Y" 1RE i UIO$S WORI
(Cmmittees Will Centralize Religious
. Edneation Work in One
Building
Five discussion groups for freshmen
with a total enrollment of 75 men, 30
of whom stayed with the groups
throughout the year and 12 groups for
sophomores and for upperclassmen,
with a total enrollment of 110 and a
steady net enrollment of 50 Inen, m'ark
the statistical results of the religious
education work carried on by the "Y',
this year.
This year's work has been under the
supervision of two committees, the
freshman work committee with Y. It.
Altsheler, '17, as chairman and the re-1
ligious education committee with W.
R. Hunt, '16, as general student chair-l
man. These two men are to have
charge of the same line of worknextI
year and so their work this year has
been largely in the laying of founda-
tions in the way of lining up men fort
leadership and executive charge oft
classes next year.f
The principal change that the com-
mittees have in mind for next year is
the centralizing of all of the religious
education work in one building. The
plan is to get all of the men in the va-
rious classe. together and hear 15
minute addre;ses. The assembly willl
then break up into groups of from five
to 10 men each which will then underI
the leadership of 30 faculty men dis-
cuss problems outlined by the central
committee.
Cooperation between the several Ann
Arbor churches and the "Y" has been
made possible, and will prevent the
overlapping of the work of these or-..
ganizations next year, due to the facto
that Roy W. Hamilton, PresbyterianQ
student pastor, has had, and will con-
tinue to have, general charge of theS
religious education work. lie has out-V
lined a course which has been adoptedi
by four of the churches, and will have b
direct supervision of the Bible schoola
next year.t
NA ME SENIOR ENGINEERS FOR d
COMMENCEMENT HONOR GUARD) t
Following is a list of senior engi- S
ieers appointed to the Honor Guard
which will escort the faculty to lill D
Luditorium on Commencement Day: o
Baxter, Ricketts, Bockstahler, Mc- '
babe, Ellis, Bateman, Sisler, S. Ab- li
ott, H. Parsons, Green, Toncray, w
lughitt, Cerry, Fishburn, Sheehy, Ken- p
tedy, Spanderline, Tavelaar, Crocker, i
nd Carl Johnson. t
A meeting of these men will be held t
it 3:00, o'clock Sunday afternoon at t

Waterman gymnasium. All men are
isked to be present. t
Fresli Lits i:ace at Bairbour Gyii ti
Fresh lit pre-exam dance was held t
n Barbour gymnasium last evening. u
Lbout 60 couples en joyed a program of is
2 dances. During the intermissions N
i delicious frappe was served. Mr. and t
irs. R. W. Cowden, Dean Myra B. 7
ordan and Mrs. W. T. Underwood a
vere the chaperons for the evening. c

BOOK FOTRE DA9ME
FOR TODAYS FRAY

Pitcher for Contest Not Named
ljaiid son oi' MCNamara
SeEi to Be ("lhoiee

but

PO ST-SKASON c rE END YEAR
Notre Dame's warriors open their
artillery on the Michigan defense at
4:05 o'clock this afternoon at Ferry
field in the second of the series of
three games which are scheduled for
the two teams. With one game to their
credit already the Wolverine are out
to win the series, and Sisler will be
one of the men to face the Catholics,
working in the last game of the se-
ries tomorrow, while either Davidson
or McNamara will be the choice for
today's game.
With the close of the Notre Dame
series, the Michigan schedule ends, ex-
cept for the two post-season games
which are scheduled with Pennsylva-
nia for June 22 and 23. The two teams
were kept from getting together at
Philadelphia, while the Wolverines
were on their eastern trip, by the bad
weather, and consequently the argu-
ment between them is still an open
one. With the last Penn game on
June 23, the Michigan ball team for
1915 will disband.
The choice of a pitcher for today's
game is still a question with Coach
Lundgren, although it is certain that
either Davidson or McNamara will be
the twirler. Davidson faced the Cath-
olics at South Bend, and outside of a
little wildness, looked good. His exper-:
ience in the former game may win him
the place, but the final decision will
rest on the physical condition of the
men after their warming up exercises.
Dope favors Wells, who pitched
against the Wolverines at South Bend,
to go in the box for the Catholics in
this afternoon's game. His battery-
mate will be Kenny, the only catcher
whom the Notre Dame men are bring-
ing with them.
The probable batting order for to-
day's game follows: Notre Dame-
Burke rf, Duggan m, Lathrop lf, Mills
lb, Kline 3b, Bergman ss, Carmody 2b,
Kenny c, Wells p; Michigan-Sheehy
m, McQueen 2b, Brandell ss, Sisler rf,
Benton c, Labadie r, Maltby 4b, Waltz
3b, Davidson or McNamara p.
Y. M. C. A. WILL REOPEINBOOK
EXCHIANGE DURING NEXT WEEK
Starting during the first week of ex-c
aris the university Y. M. C. A. will re-
open the book exchange. It will be1
open for receiving 'cooks, beginning
next week, in the "Y" building on9
State street, and will be open during
the first three weeks of next semester
in a State street store. Books will<
be insured during the summer., Sincet
a stock of books now is necessary forr
the success of the undertaking in thet
fall the management requests that stu-I
dents bring in all the books whichf
hey wish to dispose of.
senior. Medics to Visit Detroit Plante
About 40 senior medics will go tos
Detroit todhy to inspect laboratoriese
f. the Parke,Davis & Co., plant. They
will be conducted through the estab-
ishment by special attendants who
rill explain those of the company's
iroducts which will be most interest-
ng to the medics. After the inspec-p
ion of the plant, the seniors will beo
endered a banquet by the company, at e
he Hotel Statler.
'hinese Students to Join Long Tourp
Several students graduating from e
he university this year are planning d
o join a special Chinese student re- L
nion tour to the Pacific coast; which k
s under the general arrangement of ti
V. W. Welsh, '12, secretary of the In- b
ernational Bureau of students. About G
5 students from all over the country 1
re expected to make the trip in a spe- L
ial train.'

Arrange Assembly for All First
Stiudents to be Held
Next Fall

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* The Michigan Union campaign
* for building funds to be prosecu-
* ted during-the comng ummer '
* and fall throughout the country,
* will not be a camiinfdr life
* members for the Union as seems 4
* to be the impression of some,
* gathered naturally from the lo- '
* cal campaign among the stu-
* dents for life members. Such I
* an impression carried to the '
* alumni by six 'thousand stu- *
* dents might injure materially *
* the results of the campaign. The *
* plan of soliciting is to approach *
* every alumnus and ask him for '
* whatever amount he feels able "
* to give, and all those giving
* $50.00 or more will thereby be
1 entitled to a life membership in *
the Union. $50.00 is the mini- *
* mum that can be expected from '
* any alumnus. *
* The Campaign Committee asks *
* the earnest and enthusiastic sup- '
* port of the students in their *
* respective localities this sum- *
* 'mer in the effort to add another *
* building to the campus, which, *
* according to competent critics, *
* will be the most attractive and *
useful building of its kind *
* among our colleges and univer- *
* sities, *
* PATRTK D. KOONTZ, *
* Presideit. *
STUDENT COUNCI.L
PLANS F'OR FRES H,

-OBGET OF MILLION
DOlLLARSALLOWEC
Regents Pass 1915-16 Allowance for
University to Amount of
$1,812,858.89 Last
Night -
PROFESSORS AND INSTRUCTORS
NAMED FOR FIRST HALF-YEAR
Matter of Buying File of Charlestom
Newspapers Left to
Committee
Michigan's board of regents last
night passed the 1915-16 budget,
amounting to $1,812,858.89. With the
total amount known, it will now be
possible for the various departments
to make their plans for the coming
year.
In addition to passing the annual
budget, the board also made several
appointments for next year. Dr. J. E.
Baker was appointed lecturer on
transportation for the first semester.
Prof. F. T. Stockton of the University
of Indiana, was appointed to lecture
on labor problems during the first se-
mester, and Dr. R. S. Tucker was ap-
pointed instructor in the economics
department. Dr. Tucker comes well
recommended as a specialist in taxa-
tion and public finance.
The question of buying a file of old
Charleston newspapers, referred to the
budget committee at the last meeting
of the board, was last night referred
to Regent William L. Clements and
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, of the' history
department.
The resignation of Prof. J. S. P.
Tatlock, announced some time ago,
was accepted with regret.
HOLD 1IVIL SERVICE EXAMS
FOR FO D CEMIST VACANCIES

REPORT MADE ON SPRING GAMES
Another new Michigan custom came
to life last night when the student
council laid plans for a huge All-
Fresh assembly to be held soon after
the opening of college next fall. The
idea of the assembly is to acquaint the
first year men with Michigan customs
and traditions. Talks will probably
be given by men prominent in cam-
pus affairs, and the freshmen will be
guided in the right direction. A com-
mittee will be appointed this spring
to complete arrangements for the as-
sembly.
A final report was made by the stu-
dent councilmen investigating the in-
juries resulting from the spring con-
tests. It developed that R. W. Rouse,
'17, who sustained a broken nose in.the
push-ball contest in all probability
did not receive his wound from a
spiked shoe as was first thought. Ac-
cording to Dr. H. H. Cummings who
treated Rouse, the marks .in the flesh
near the wound, which were thought
to have been spike imprints were
probably caused by splinters from a
fractured bone.
George L. Cook, '17L, and Arthur V.
Moninger, '16A, who were recently
elected to the council from their re-
spective classes were sworn in at the
coulhcil last night.
SHAKESPEAREAN READERS GIVE
"LADY OF LYONS" BEFORE -500
More than 500 people witnessed the
platform recital of Lord Lutton's fam-1
ous drama, "The Lady of Lyons," giv-1
en by the members of Prof. T. C. True-l
blood's classes in Shakespearean read-
ng in University Hall last night. Thel
play is one of intense dramatic inter-1
est and great praise is due to the stu-1
dents who took part. The acting of1
M. S. McLean, '16, and Francis Hic-
kok, '15, in the last act was very effec-4
ive while special mention must also
be made of the work of Mildred Rees,c
G. D. Wilner, '18, 'L. E. Nieter, '17,1
Rubert Woodworth, '17, C. Bailey, '17,{
. J. Daily, '17, and W. S. Westerman,'
18.

Year

Examinations will be held on Jun
5, 1915, by the Illinois State Civil Ser-
vice Commission in the office of the
State Food Commissioner in Chicago
for the purpose of providing an eligi-
ble list for the filling of vacancies as
they existlin the position of food chem-
ist.
The position which is open to all
non-residents. of Illinois, pays from
$100 a month at the start to $150 a
month, and is open to men and women
over 21. The duties involve under the
direction of the state Analyst, analysis
of food stuffs to determine whether
they contain constituents contrary to
the provisions of the statutes. The
chemist must also act as an expert
witness at prosecutions for violations
of the law.
OIRLS' GLEE CLUB CHOOSES
OFFICERS FOR COMING YEAR
Girls' Glee club members met last
night to elect officers for next year.
Those honored with offices in the club
are: President, Ellen Sargeant, '16;
vice-president, Eleanor Stalker, '16;
secretary, Inez Gose, '17; treasurer,
Ruth Kreger, '16; librarian, Ruth But-
ler, '17.
1913 Lits Will Hold First Reunion
Among the reunions planned for
Commencement week is thattof the lit-
erary class of 1913. Bulletins in news-
paper form will be mailed to all mem-
bers of the class, and the first regular
biennial reunion will be held. About
75 members of the class from Ann Ar-
bor and Detroit have signified their
intention of being present. A program
has been arranged by Selden S. Dick-
inson, '15L.
Surveyig Camp Assistants Selected
Student assistants at the surveying
camp on Douglas Lake have been ap-
pointed as follows: H. J. Bill, '14E;
G. M. Bleekman, '16E; W. M. Cannan,
'15E; W. E. Code, '16E; C. W. Smed-
burg, '15E; H. C. Smith, '15E.

RYOUTS TO MEET
PLAN FIRST ISSUE
or the Wolverine, the
nearly completed, a
nen who intend to try
ortorial and editorial
held this afternoon in
om of The Daily.
e of the paper will be
ncement number, and
.des of interest to the
g to the city, as well
ates and undergradu-
epare for this number
oon's meeting, sched-
clock is called.

3
S
A
r
F
T
r

summaries follow:
Junior Laws
AB R
Martin, 3b.........4 2
Brown, If........ 4 3
Brownell, ss.......4 2
Rowan, p........... 4 2
Stevens, 1b........2 1
Thomas, c.......... 3 0
Scott rf............ 3 0
Nichols, n............3 2
Thornell, 2b.......4 0

H
1
1
2
2
0
0
0
1
0

PO
1
0
1
1
8
6
1
0
3

A
1
0
2
2
0
1
0
0
2

E
2
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
5

Total...........31 12 7 21 8
Fresh Lits
AB RH PO A
Sharpe, rf..........4 1 2 0 0
Reem, 3b..........4 1213
Riley, lf............ 3 1 1 0 0
Lambert, 21r.........4 1 1 0 0
Ohlmacher p........4 0 1 1 2
Loeb, m............ 4 0 0 2 0
Perry, c.......... 4 0 0 8 0
(Continled on page 6)

F
0
1
0
1
1
0
3

BASEBALL

TO DAY

SAT URDAY

I

DAME vs. MICHIGAN

NOTRE DAME vs. MICHIGAN

4:05 P. M.

Admission 50c.

Ferry Field 3:00 P. M.

Admission

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