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October 18, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

1

iigan

DailyE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1914.

PRICE FIVE C

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'_'3

GGIES BVif TO 0;
AY NOT PLAY AGl

AdFa

A

i?
LF
LINE
TODAY

17.-Michi-
3 to 0, but

in
.ke]

G. R. Swain speaks, Congregational
church, 6:30 o'clock.
Dr. James H. Richards, "Y" Majestic
meeting; moving pictures 6:10
o'clock; address, 6:30 o'clock.
Prof. J. W. Langley speaks to young
people, Unitarian church, 7:00
o'clock.
Rabbi Elkan C. Voorsanger speaks to
Jewish students, McMillan hall,
6:45 o'clock.
First Quarter
Captain Raynsford won the toss and
chose the south goal. Julian fumbled
after reaching the 30 yard line but the
Aggies recovered and after an at-
tempted forward pass had been block-
ed Deprato kicked to Hughitt on
Michigan's 35 yard line. Splawn gained
8 yards on a fake punt and Michigan
lost the ball on a fumble in the next
play.

TO EXTEND REACI OF WIRELESSI
Station to Have Range of 3,000 Miles
After Repairs
After the repairs have been coiA-
pleted the university station will have
a regular working range of 3,000 miles,
and will be able to work with both.
the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. At
present the station is in communica-
tion with all the states except Ala-
bama and Kansas, in which there ared
neither private nor commercial sta-'
tions with which the university wire-
less operators are able to talk.
A schedule of all private stations
with which the university station is
in communication will be worked up,
and the operators here will probably
be working with the commercial sta-
tions at all times. Only students who
are licensed wireless operators will
be employed this year. D. A. Nichols,]
'18E, who has been an operator for theJ
Marconi company for the past three
years . in their Great Lakes stations,
will act as chief operator.
BOSTON PREACHER
LECTUES TNIGH

an
m-

This
came

Paul Blanslard, '14, Predicis
D . J. A. Richards Will
Make Impression

That

er, Miu.-
vn on the
s, and in,
aes, with
11 to the
1 goaled.

I I

and

Deprato put the ball on Michigan's
eight yard line and after time out for
Hughitt, Splawn returned the ball to
the center of the field. The line held
against Julian and Michigan got the
ball on her own 30 yard line. Splawn
again punted and the Aggies lost 15
yards for holding. Roehm replaced
Bushnell at right half. A line play
by Julian and a punt by Deprato sent
the ball to Michigan's 40 yard line
where Splawn kicked. M. A. C. was
penalized 15 yards for holding by
Blacklock, and time was called for
Staatz who was replaced by Dunne
after the next play. M. A. C.'s ball in
midfield, end first .quarter, Michigan

tihe
ch

fen-
lhed

est game
gh suffer-
and Mc-
s also put

g aboutl

n kept his eleven starters in
'e game, the superior condi-
ie Aggies, trained to the min-
heir big game, .telling. Yost
practically an entirely new
aynsford, Rehor and Maul-
eing the only starters left at
whistle.
rains Made by Teams
I the ends, the Aggies had it
way, until Efton James went
n and B. Miller tore off great
und the flanks and the AggiesI
5 yards to 18 for Michigan
ode of attack. On line plung-
gan made 91 and the Farmers
duel eing between Julian and
;ch, principally.
ward pasing, however, Michi-
layed the Farmers. The Ag-
d ten and made one while
tried three, and made one
risis of the final march. The
tes had the punch that spelled
Penalties were so numerous
y interfered with the work of
,ns. Michigan lost 65 yards,'
aggies 85.
Score Shows Merits
an played conservative foot-
, the Syracuse coaches in the
M. A. C., however, played her
t game and lost. But it was
able defeat, and the score rep-,
quite fairly. the relative mer-j

0, M. A. C. 0.
Second Quarter
An exchange of punts gave the Ag-
gies the ball on Michigan's 40 yard
line. After a trick play through the
line which netted the Aggies their
yards Hughitt was replaced by Huebel.
The Farmers were again penalized
and were sent back to the Wolverines'
40 yard line. After Deprato had fail-a
ed to kick a goal from placement at
that position the ball was scrimmaged
on Michigan's 20 yard line.
A reversed penalty gave Michigan
the ball and Splawn punted from the
5 yard line. Two good runs by B. Mil-
ler and Julian and the one successful
Aggie forward pass, netted 42 yards
for the Farmers. Another penalty
sent the ball to Michigan's 30 yard line
where another attempt at a goal from
the field failed. An intercepted for-
ward pass gave the ball to Michigan
on her 35 yard line and Splawn kick-
ed. Two runs by H. Miller and a pen-
alty sent the ball to Michigan's five
yard line. Julian failed to gain through
the line as the half ended. Michigan
0, M. A. C. 0.
Third Quarter
Hughitt started the second half at
quarter. An exchange of five punts
gave M. A. C. the ball on her own 25
yard line where Lyons intercepted an
Aggie attempt at a forward ' pass.
Maulbetsch made the yards for Michi-
gan in two downs. On the M. A. C.
five yard line the Aggies braced and
their line held. Deprato punted to
Roehm on M. A. C.'s 40 yard line.
Michigan's attempted forward pass
went out of bounds on M. A. C.'s 30
yard line, where the Aggies took the
ball. A five yard penalty gave the
Farmers first down on their own 35
yard line. Deprato punted to Roehm
on Michigan's 42 yard line. Michigan's
ball in midfield, end third quarter.
Michigan 0, M. A. C. 0..
(Continued on page 6)

Y. M. C. At .IOLDS TilIRD EETING
Dr. James A. Richards, pastor of
Mt. Vernon church, Boston, of which
Dr. Albert Parker Fitch was pastor
before becoming president of Andover
Theological Seminary (Harvard), will
be the principal speaker at the thirdf
"Y" meeting of the year at the Majes-
tic theater at 6:30 o'clock tonight. He
will talk on "A Fine Fight."
Paul Blanshard, '14, Michigan's
honor orator last year, who is study-
ing in Andover Theological Seminary,
in a letter to the university Y. M. C.
A. officials, commented on Dr. "n, 11-
ards as follows:
"His sermon impressed me very
much. He has plenty of vigor and I
think he will be a success in Ann Ar-
bor."
Moving pictures, beginning at 6:10
o'clock, will precede Dr. Richards' ad-
dress. A chorus, composed of uni-
versity students, will lead the sing-
ing. A stereoptican slide containing
the words of "The Yellow and Blue,"
will be thrown on the screen for the
benefit of the freshmen who arc not
yet acquainted with the song.
Dr. Richards will also address mem-
bers of the First Congregational
church Sunday morning at 10:30
o'clock.
])ean C. Worcester Donates Documents
Documents of a valuable nature re-
lating to the Philippine Islands have
been received by the university
through the board of regents from
Dean C. Worcester, '89, Sc.D. '14,
member of the second Philippine com-
mission and until recently Secretary
of the Interior of the Philippine Isl-
ands.
Further provision has been made
for the copying of a series of selected
documents, numbering about 250,000,
which were captured by the army.
during the insurrection in the Phil-
ippines. These have been written in
Spanish, Spanish cipher, and the na-
tive dialects, and have been translated
after four years' work.
Y.M.C.A. Officers Seek Committeemen
Officers of the University "Y" are
-making a big campaign to enlist com-
mitteemen to work out the plans pro-
jected for the year. Four hundred
men are wanted and letters are being
plaining the need for workers. Al-
sent to the entire membership ex-
ready more than 100 have responded,
though only a portion of the list has
been mailed.

PURCHASING AGENT
CIt11005_RESIGN
Regents Also Accept Withdrawal of
Dr. C. A. Burrett; Give French
Instructor Leave of
Absence
GRANT NUMBER OF DEGRES TO
STUDENTS IN SUMMER SESSIO
Approve Appointments of ;Assistants;
Receive Fellowships and
Other Gifts
Charles L. Loos tendered his res-
ignation to the board of regents and
it was accepted at the monthly meet-
ing which ended yesterday mornng.
It will take effect January 1.
The resignation of Dr. Claude .A.
Burrett, as professor of surgery and
genito-urinary diseases' and derma-
tology, and registrar of the homeo-
pathic medical college, was received,
and accepted with regiet. Dr. Burrett
has associated himself with the newly
established homeopathic department
at Ohio State university. Indefinite
leave of absence was granted to Rene
Talamon, instructor in French, who is
at present serving in the French army.
Recognizing the importance of es-
tablishing a demonstration school for
the benefit of the department of edu-
cation at the university, the board of
regents voted to have the matter
brought before them for detailed con-
sideration at the November meeting.
The university health service was
authorized to give free medical exami-
nation to all entering students, espe-.
cially to those not taking physical
training. The regents also voted to
give to students of the Michigan Nor-.
mal college the right to receive treat-,
ment at the university hospitals.
Arrangements for a combined course
between the engineering department
and Albion college were approved by
the regents. Details of these arrange-
ments were not considered.
The carrying on of extension lec-
tures at Saginaw on the credit plan
was authorized.
Dr. Leroy Waterman, professor in.1
the Meadville Theological seminary,.
Meadville, Pa., was elected professor
of Semetics, his term of service to
begin in the fall of 1916. C. C. Glover,
teaching assistant In pharmacy, was
appointed instruetor in that depart-
ment. P. H. DeKruif, was appointed.
instructor in bacteriology. Dr. Chas.
B. Abell was appointed instructor in
thernology. Permission was granted
to the dental and English departments
to increase the number of assistants to
take care of the enlarge'd enrollment.
Provision was also made for an addi-
tional assistantship in the laboratory
for testing road material, as the num-
ber of requests from municipalities
for such tests has increased beyond
the capacity of the present teaching
force.
The resignation of Miss Franc Pat-
tison, assistant in the general library,
was accepted.
The regents accepted an offer of Dr.
W. E. Upjohn, of Kalamazoo, to pro-
vide a fellowship for one year for
research work under Dean V. C.
Vaughan, of the department of medi-
cine and surgery. Roy Webster Pryer
was appointed, Upjohn fellow. J. R.
Dean was appointed holder of the
fellowship of the Flavoring Extract
Manufacturing Co., for the year 1914-
1915. Several other gifts were receiv-
ed.
Dr. E. L. Troxell was engaged to

mount the fossil hippopotamus, which
was donated to the university by Ex-
Gov. Chase S. Osborne.
The electrification of the spur rail-
road running between the Michigan
Central tracks and the university
store-rooms was referred to the build-
ings and grounds committee, with in-
structions to obtain estimates of cost
and report at the November meeting
(Continued on page 6)

Michigan 3, M. A. C. 0.
All-Fresh 128, Adrian 0.
Harvard 13, Tufts 6.
Syracuse 19, Rochester 0.
Pennsylvania 13, Navy 6.
Cornell 48, Bucknell 0.
-Yale 28, Notre Dame 0.
Princeton 16, Lafayette 0.
Chicago 7, Iowa 0.
South Dakota 72, Minnesota 29.'
Wisconsin 14, Purdue 7.
Jllinois 37, Ohio State 0.
0ase 2, Ohio Wes. 10.
Mount Union 13, Western Re-
serve 0.
Pittsburg 10, Carlisle 3.

HUTCHINS TO TALK
TO ALLFRESHMEN
H B. Carpenter, '14-'17L, Also Speaks;
A. X. Reid Toastmaster at
Union Dinner
PURPOS E TO ACQUAINT NEW MEN
President Harry B. Hutchins will
be the principal speaker at the all-
freshman dinner to be given at 6:00
o'clock Wednesday evening at the
Michigan Union. H. Beach Carpenter,
'14-'17L, managing editor of The
Michigan Daily; will be the student
speaker. Allen M. Reed, '13-'15L, will
act as toastmaster. Musical num-
bers will be furnished by a freshman
orchestra.
The affair is fostered by the Union
and is the first dinner of the kind ever:
held. Freshmen from every depart-
ment may attend. Tickets selling at
50 cents each may be obtained at the
Union desk or from any member of
the committee in charge, of which J. C.
Leonard, '17L, is chairman.
Opportunity is afforded to those who
attend, of becoming better acquainted.
The problem of furnishing a chance
for freshmen to become acquainted
with one another at the beginning of
the year has always been a serious
one and this event bids fair to help
largely in accomplishing this purpose.
Nominations for offices in the various
freshman classes will be made very
soon and the dinner is expected to
produce much more intelligent choices.

* * * * * * * * *
YESTERDAY'S FOOTBA]
SCORES
(Courtesy of Huston Bros

* *
LL
.)}

-0--

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Henrickson,
Willard...... L
Thompson.......C
Whelan, Shultz... RG
Ewert ............ RT

Ryan, Car
pen
.. Sot
.Steinfe
... McKnight

Adrian seemed confused by the op
play of Douglas' boys and showed of
at its best when the attack was cc
centrated upon the line. At that po
she proved herself able to hold t
own, and with this discovery the 1
play was abandoned for open p
where the fresh scored at will.
The line-ups:
Freshmen Adr
Inghams, Robins..LE .Laudenslau
ger, Yc
Pobanz........... LT . . Hart, Rich
arda

FRESH TAKE THREI
POINTS A MINUI
Douglas' Machine Dazes Adrian I
Through Use of Open Game;
Scores Touchdowns
at Will
ADRIAN ABLE TO FOLD ONLY
WHEN PLAYS HIT HER L
Bnne and Schultz Individual Star
.Quarter and .Right Half
Positions
(Special to The Michigan Daily
ADRIAN, MICH., Oct. 17.-Mi
gan's All-Fresh eleven came wi
four points of rolling up a three p
a minute score against Adrian
afternoon. In two 10 and two 12 r
ute quarters the youngsters scored
points against a zero score for th
opponents.
Dunne at quarter and Schultz
right half were the individual st
for the protegees of Coach Dougla
their first game away from their ho
gridiron. Schultz played a strong
fensive game at half scoring five
the 19 touchdowns made by the 2
Fresh. Smith was second with fo
and Dunne, who was removed fa
part of the game was third in the
tal with three trips over the goal
to his credit.
All manner of football proved tc
of the ground gaining V
e t y for the freshmen,
bucks being the only p
that Adrian could hold at all. For-
passes and end runs were the t-
est ground covering plays. Rol:
playing one end for a part of the ga
and Robins at the other managed
score two counters apiece on the o
work stuff.

Richarc
Romans, Brazell.. RE........M
Dunne, Friedman. Q .. Cutlin, S
Schultz, Foster.. LH .. Symond

AUTOMOBILE DEPARTMENT TO
PRESENT MAXWELL CO. FILMS
Research Students Work on Subject
of Back Prsesure Caused
By Mufflers
Arrangements with the Maxwell
Vfotor Car Co. have been made by the
automobile department, for the pre-
sentation in Ann Arbor of their mov-
ing picture films and lecture entitled
"From Molten Steel to Automobile."
The lecture will be given under the
general auspoices of the Engineering
society in the latter part of October
and will be freetotall interested.
In the automobile research course,
Messrs. Buell and DeGowin, senior me-
chanical engineers, are doing special
work on automobile mufflers, in an
attempt to . formulate laws governing
the loss in motor horse-power output
as influenced by back pressure and
general muffler design. They have
been presented with standard mufflers
by the Ford and Hudson motor car
companies, as well as with several
special designs.
Two Marvel carburetors were re-
cently presented to the automobile de-
partment for laboratory testing work
and demonstration.

Raymond.......RH. ......
Smith,,Dunne....FB.......

Le
Ro

Score 1 2
Mich. All-Fresh 41 36
Atlrian........0 0

3
21
0

4
30
0

Touchdowns-Schultz 5, Dunne 3
Smith 4, Romans 2, Robbins 2, Foster
Brazell and Raymond. Goals ' fron
touchdown-Schultz 7 in 10, Willard
7 in 9.
Officials-Referee,aWesley; Umpire
D~avis; Headlinesman, Sala.
Find Michigan Men in "Who's Who"
Michigan graduates form three pe
cent of the total number of names in-
eluded in the new volume of the 191
edition of "Who's Who in America
which has been recently published
These !hgures,. which were obtained
from Lieutenant Thomas M. Spaul
ding, '05, now at Washington, D. C
show an increase of twenty-five grad
nates and former students over th
compilation made from the 1913 edi
tion, when there were only 604 Michi
gan students as opposed to a total c
629 for this year.

and Blue"

'deli"

Maljestic

*.Meeting
MOVIES AT 6:10

rown on the

The man who
succeeded lb-
ert Parker Fitch

Come and

6:30

.

.

words!

Dr. JAMES A. RICHARDS, Boston, Massachusetts

.!

I-

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