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June 01, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-06-01

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THE DAILY
FOR BALANCE OF THE YEAR
MAILEl Th5 7LOCAL

The

Mich igan

D

SUBSCRIBE
NOW
MAILED 750c L

Vol. XXV, No. 176.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 1915.

PRICE FIVE C

KOOB WILL OPPOSE
WOLVERINES TODAY

LFJ I--E U

CAMPUS ELECTION GREEK FETE TO BE
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UMY PLAN 5UEUL51

Lundgren Will Use Siser in Seeond
Western Normal Game, if
Veteran Is in
Shape
TEAM !TAKES STIFF WORKOUT
ON EVE OF KALAMAZOO TILT
Brandell Will Be in Left Field with
Shivel at Short Stop
Position
Western Normal, better known to
Michigan students as "that team with
pitcher Koob," plays the second game
of the season. with the Wolverines at
4:05 o'clock today at Ferry field. Mich-
igan's choice for a twirler will prob-
ably be Sisler, with provisions as to
the star twirler's physical condition.
Sisler worked so well in the first
M. A. C. game that the coach is saving
him for one of the Notre Dame con-
flicts which come at the end of this
week. With the prospects of a stiff
battle with the Catholics before him
Coach Lundgren wants to use Fer-
guson and Sisler against them. This
puts Sisler in the position of working
twice in the same week, something
which the left-hander has not done
this year.
If the veteran feels fit he will be the
choice of the coach, while either Fer-
guson or McNamara will face Kalama-
zoo if Sisler is not able to oppose
Koob in the box. Since Ferguson is
in the same position as Sisler, it is
probable that McNamara will start
against the Celery City nine if the
coach is unable to work his big men.
For the first time since 1912, in
which year the Lansing crew beat
Michigan in two out of three games,
the Wolverine nine let the Aggies get
the best of the series. Saturday's game,1
the deciding game of the series was'
characterized by the same lack of]
punch which has been the cause of
-losing many other games this year in'
which the Michigan nine should have1
come out on top.
Michigan outhit the Aggies, but thei
hits could not be pulled together
enough to make as heavy an impres-1
sion in the runs column as the M. A. C.1
men were able to make. In addition
to this the Michigan nine was guilty
of two counts under the head of er-1
rors, where the home team committed
but one such offense.
The men were working hard at Fer-
ry field yesterday afternoon, resolvedt
on getting into shape to take the count
over the Kalamazoo team. They wenti
through a fielding and hitting drillI
which should have put them into shape
for the conflict, and after the infield-
ers were through the coach gave hisa
garduers a hard workout in chasingi
fly balls, and in pegging to the plate.c
If Sisler pitches today's game the1
batting order will probably be as fol-i
lows: Sheehy m, McQueen 2b, Bran-1
dell If, Sisler p, Benton c, Labadie rf,
Maltby 1b, Waltz 3b, Shivel ss. I
JUNIOR RESEARCH SOCIETY TO
HOLD ANNUAL DINNER TONIGHT1
Junior Research society will hold its
annual dinner and initiation of newly
elected members at the Union at 6:30
o'clock tonight. Dr. J: F. Shepard, ofc
the psychology department, and Dean
M. E. Cooley of the engineering de-N
partment, will be the principal speak-
ers at the annual affair, while Mr. I.1
K. Immel, of the oratory department,I
will act as toastmaster. Several mu-
sical selections will be given by Wih-1
tred Cook, grad., and H. E. Loyd, '18E.
Employment Bureau Will Close Soont
Activities of the Union employmenty
bureau will cease after the close ofc
the college year, and will not be re-t

sumed until September. Several oddc
jobs have been distributed since Sat-t
urday,' But lack of support from pat-r
rons has hindered the -department. I

TODAY
"Persephone and Demeter" in Observ-
atory hollow at 7:15 o'clock..
Baseball game, Varsity vs. Kalamazoo
Western Normal at Ferry field at
4:05 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Band rehearsal in University hall at
7:00 o'clock.
Woman's League election in general
library from 8:00 to 5:00 o'clock.
Dixie club meeting at the Union at
7:15 o'clock.
Michiganensian staff dinner at the Un-
ion at 6:30 o'clock.
Tau Beta Pi dinner at the Union at
6:00 o'clock.
RABBI L. FRANKLIN ADDRESSES
MEETING OF JEWISH STUDENTS
Members of the Jewish Students
Congregation held their last Sunday
service and business meeting of the
year Sunday evening. The service was
conducted by Rabbi Leo M. Franklin
of Temple Beth El of Detroit, who,
apropos of the day, delivered a ser-
mon on Memorial Day. In the course
of it he deplored the present war in
Europe, spoke of the deleterious effect
it will have on the coming generations,
and impressed on his hearers that, in
decking the graves of the Civil War
dead, all should remember that they
fought and died not for territorial
gain, but for the cause of humanity.
Following the services, the society
elected as officers for the coming year:
President, Edward W. Hoffman, '161L;
vice-president, Miss Virginia B.
Morse, '16; secretary, Melvin R. Gom-
brig, '17; and treasurer, M. S. Trost,
'17. Three directors were also chosen:
Harry Rabinowitz, '16L, Joseph Co-
hen, '17, and Robert M. Schiller, '18.
The terms of the other two directors,
Edwin Hyman, '17, and Julian Klee-
man, '17, were continued through the
ensuing year.
It was decided by the organization
to t'ake steps toward securing New-i
berry hall as a meeting place for next
year.
KARPINSKI AND HENDERSON TO
LEAVE FOR PART OF SUMMER
Professors Louis C. Karpinski, ofa
the department of mathematics, andi
William D. Henderson, of the depart-
ment of physics, will each spend a
part of the summer teaching in the
Teachers' Institute, Versailles, Indi-
ana. The institute is the seat of ped-
agogical) learning in the county, offer-
ing courses of instruction to teachersl
of elementary schools in the county
particularly, although it is supportedE
by the state. Professor Karpinski will
go to Versailles after the summer1
school here, about the last week in1
August. He will probably be preced-1
ed by Professor Henderson.
PALMER AND STEARNS VICTORS
IN CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF MATCH
- t
Palmer and Stearns defeated Bohl-
ing and Borcherdt in the Sunday match1
of the inter-departmental golf tour-t
ney, thus cinching the tournament asc
well as the campus championship. Thet
score at the end of the play stood 14
points down and 12 to go, in favor ofI
Palmer and Stearns.
Marks and Stearns Win in Golf Play
Marks defeated Beers in the firstI
match of yesterday's preliminaries inl
the individual golf tournament begun
yesterday for members of the Golf
club. Stearns defeated Borcherdt inI

the only other matcl\ played. No han-
dicaps are being allowed in this tour-i
nament. A cup will be given the win-i
ner, emblematic of the campus cham-1
pionship.

Consensus of Opinion Is That System
]raws More Representative
Student Vote
TO CONTINUE METHOD NEXT YEAR.
Michigan's initial Campus Election
Day, held last Thursday, apparently
met with the universal approval of the
student body, and the opinions f rep-
resentative officials and members of
the four organizations participating in
the election agree tliat a larger vote
was polled than in the old manner of
holding separate elections for the va-
rious organizations.-
Patrick Duffy Koontz, '17L, presi-
dent of the Michigan Union, when ask-
ed his opinion of this year's innova-
tion, said, "I believe that the Campus
Election Day plan was a success this
year in that it drew a larger and more
representative vote than the old man-i
ner of holding elections. The plan
should be continued, although it might
be improved by holding the election
earlier in the year."
Prof. A. S. Whitney, president of the
athletic association, expressed himself
as in favor of continuing the plan.
"Campus Election Day is an excellent
plan for securing a more representa-
tive vote," said Professor Whitney yes-
terday.
Prof. Gordon Stoner, of the board
in control of student publications, said,
"I have not made a sufficient study of
the results of the election to determine
whether the Campus Election Day
brought out a more intelligent vote
than under the old system. If the stu-
dent body is convinced that the new
plan does secure a more intelligent
vote, the plan should be continued.
However, the fact that the vote was
larger does not necessarily mean that
it was more intelligent."
While officials of the Boat club
could not be reached last night, it
seems to be the consensus of opinion
among the members of that-organiza-
tion that the general election has
proved successful and should be con-
tinued next year.
"The Campus Election Day was a
success, and it will undoubtedly be
continued," said Allan W. Mothersill,
'15, member of the student council, last
night. "It is the plan of the council to
include all class elections in the gen-
eral election day next year, thus ren-
dering the vote cast still more repre-
sentative of the whole student body."
APPOINT TWO MEN TO ASSIST
IN HISTORY WORK NEXT YEAR
Two new assistants have been ap-
pointed to the history department for
next year. Mr. Goshorn, now a resi-
dent of Grand Rapids, will assist Pro-
fessor Van Tyne in the American his-;
tory department, while Mr. Hines will;
take a division of the European sec-i
tion. Both men will do graduate work.
Senate Considering Military Training
Miltary training for undergradu-
ates is at present receiving considera-
tion in the university senate. No defi-
nite action has been taken or plans
formulated. It was discussed beforei
the regents in their last meeting but no.
definite expression was made at thati
time.
Big Crowd Attends Choral Union Party
Several hundred persons attended1
the party given for the Choral Union
members on Prof. A. A. Stanley's]
lawn yesterday. Among the guests was
Dean Crane, of the literary college of1
Cornell University.
Borcerdt Elected to Succeed Tappingi
E. Borcherdt, '17, was elected sec-1

retary-treasurer of the Golf club at a1
meeting of the executive committee
held yesterday noon. He will succeed1
T. H. Tapping, '17L, who has resigned.

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EMUEAILUIUNIGHI
Second Production of "Persephone and
Demeter" Perfected in
Details
HOLD TICKET SALE ON CAMPUS
"Persephone and Demeter," when
presented tonight for the second time,
promises to overshadow the success
which attended its former perform-
ance.
When the spot lights are thrown
upon the nymphs advancing out of the
cluster of trees in the background,
their rays will fall upon a finished
production of the Greek dancing fete.
Every detail has been perfected and
rehearsed under the direction of Miss
Alice Evans, director of physical edu-
cation in Barbour gym.
The same cast of 60 women, of the
university, will present the fete to-
night, as portrayed the myth on last
Wednesday. Tickets will be placed'
on sale today on the campus. A larger
number of seats has been provided for
the accommodation of the anticipated
crowd.
OFFICIALS FOR COMING YEAR
ELECTED BY MENORAH SOCIETY
Officers for the Menorah society for
the coming year were elected at the
meeting of that society last Sunday
night. Those chosen to fill the va-
rious offices are: President Abraham
J. Levin, '17; vice-president, Henry
Weinstein, '16E; secretary, Joseph Co-
hen, '17; treasurer, Leonard H. Grey,
lit special; administrative board, Har-
ry Rabinowitz, '14-'16L, and Jacob H.
Berkowitz, '16E; editor to the Meno-
rah Journal, Maurice Weinberger,
'16L; and librarian, Hermine W. Cohn,
'18. A plan for next year's work was
also mapped out, which it is expected
will make the coming year even more
successful than was this one.
DEAN R. W. LEE OF McGILL TO
ADDRESS ORDER OF THE COIF
Judge R. W. Lee, dean of the Law
School at McGill University of Mon-
treal, has been secured to deliver the
address at the annual public meeting
of the Order of the Coif, which will be
given at 4:00 o'clock Thursday after-
noon in room C of the law building.
Judge Lee will talk on the subject
"The Civil Law and the Common Law
-a World Survey," after which the
society will banquet at the Union,
where he will be the guest of honor.
Will Hold Examinations for Chemists
Examinations for food chemists by
the Illinois Civil Service Commission,
open to all non-residents of Illinois,
will be held on June 5. A salary of
$100 to $150 accompanies the position,
and the requirements demand that all
applicants be 21 years old. More de-
tailed information can be obtained by
addressing the State Civil Service
Commission, Springfield, Ill.
Extempore Classes Give Final Program
Several men selected from the vari-
ous courses in extemporaneous speak-
ing will give a final program at 4:00
o'clock Wednesday in University Hall.
All those interested are invited to
come. It has also been announced that
the public program which was to have
been given today by the students of
course I in oratory has been postponed
to some day later this week.
Install Gold Fibre Screen in Majestic
Manager J. J. Hebert, of the Majes-
tic theater, has just installed a gold
fibre screen in his playhouse. This is

the same kind of a screen that is used
in the Strand and other big photoplay
houses in New York City, and makes
the pictures shown the acme of clear-
ness. Within a few days Manager He-
bert will have antiseptic perfume cir-
culators placed about the theater.

FRESH LITS WIN FI PLACE S
IN CLASS BASEBALL CONTESTS
Play off Tie Gameas twenDuior
Laws and Soph Erigineers to
Dse' WILL CLOSE SEASON
With one game yet to be played, the Captain Reindel's Men Will Meet Team
play-off of a tie between the junior Composed of Detroters
laws and the soph engineers, the at Ferry Field
endings in class baseball show the Saturday
fresh lits as leaders, with the junior
laws as the only outfit that is within PRESENT RACQUET WIELDERS
hailing distance of them. If the boil- EQUAL OF PREVIOUS NETTERS
ermakers should succeed in defeating
the barristers, these two teams will Crawford, Mack and Switzer to Be on
be tied with the medics for second Squad Next Year; Many Other
place, necessitating further meeting Good Men in Field
between the three.
Following are the complete stand- Captain Reindel's 1915 tennis team
ings of the teams to date: will round out a successful season
Won Lost Pt.
Fresh lits4........4 1 .800 when it meets a team composed of De-
Junior laws......3 1 750 troit alumni at Ferry field next Sat-
Fresh medics .... 3 2 .600 urday. The present aggregation has,
Soph engineers ...2 2 .500 according to a statement from a man
Junior dents ......2 3 .400 close in touch with tennis at Michigan
Pharmics . 0 5 000 during the last ten years, proved it-
Vittory in all four of their contests self the equal, if not the peer of any
entitles the homeops to play the fifth other squad which has represented
and fourth teams in the first division. Michigan on the courts.
Should they win both of these strug- The eastern trip was a big feather
gles, numerals will be given to the in the cap of the team. The men were
homeop nine as well as the three lead- defeated but twice on the journey, once
ing teams, by Oberlin, which team beat them
again Saturday at Ferry field, and
TO DISCONTINUE AERO FLIGHTS again by Pennsylvania. Four matches
were recorded as victories for Michi-
Club Makes Plans to Repair Machine gan, and one was unfinished, although
during Summer the score was on the Wolverine side
Aeroplane flights at Michigan will when it was postponed.
be unknown until next fall, when it is In addition to the eastern trip, the
expected that the Aero club's machine, team met the players of the Detroit
which suffered so disastrously in last and Toledo tennis clubs. The Ohio
Friday's ascension, will be repaired. club was able to conquer the men
The accident, which occured when F. from Ann Arbor, but the university
E. Loudy, '15E, was guiding the ma- team took the Detroit match unexpect-
chine on one of its trial flights, is at- edly. The mtch last Saturday against
tributed by him to the fact that when Oberlin, the first to be played at Ferry
making a turn and using his wing- field in many years, and the match
warping device, the latter caused the against the Detroit alumni are the final
machine to start going upwards. encounters for the 1915 squad.
At the same time the right wing Captain Reindel is the only man at
dropped until the machine was at an present playing regularly on the ten-
angle of 45 degrees. This is the criti- nis team who will not be back next
cal angle for the machine, at which it year. Crawford, Mack and Switzer are
can no longer maintain its equilibrium. all 1:niors. This fact, in addition to
Accordingly the machine started to the fact that there are several men
"slide" sideways. When started it was who were in the running for Varsity
impossible to stop the sliding and the jobs this year and who showed prom-
machine hit the water, first with the ise, who will be back, augurs well
right wing, which crumpled up, and for the squad which will play for the
then with the pontoons, which col- Maize and Blue in 1916. Among the
lapsed. The pilot sustained several men who were considered for the Var-
slight bruises. sity this year and who will be back to
One plan for having the machine try for positions are Wright, Cohen,
repaired is to ship it to Saginaw to Angell, Barthel, Eaton, Bradbeer, and
the Wright Bros. agent at that place, Codd.
who wanted it for demonstration pur- The All-Fresh tennis squad will fur-
poses during the summer. The pro- nish some contenders in the persons
posal is that the agent put the machine of Coons and Sherwood. Both these
into condition in return for his use of men are of big team CalibreCoons being
it during the summer. It is hoped that the more experienced of the two. He
this plan will be successful; other- was the winner of the All-Fresh ten-
wise the members of the club will re- nis tourney this spring, and is the
pair the machine themselves next fall. mainstay of the fresh team. Sherwood
is an eastern crack who has been out
MUCH INTEREST EVIDENCED IN of the running most of the year be-
SUMMER JOURNALISM COURSES cause of scholastic difficulties, but who
should come vthrough in good shape
That much interest is being taken next year. Among the other freshman
in the journalism courses offered for players who may be in the running
the coming summer session, is evident are Steketee, Stocking and Stebbins.
from the number of inquiries received Just who will make up the alumni
by Mr. Lyman Bryson, head of the team to play next Saturday is not def-
journalism classes. initely known. Donovan, at one time
Several letters from editors of small captain of the Michigan net team, and
newspapers have come to Mr. Bryson, the only Detroit player to win a match
asking the particulars pertaining to in the previous Detroit-Michigan meet-
the two courses offered in the sum- ing, will probably head the invaders,
mer school. but who will be his supporters has not
Mr. Bryson says that several special been decided. The Michigan players
lectures will be given by men promi- should have little difficulty in trim-
nent in actual newspaper work. Two of ming the Detroiters, according to the
those who probably will speak to the dope.
classes are Mr. George B. Catlin, edi-

torial writer of the Detroit News, and Look for Large Attendance at Geneva
Mr. E. D. R. Smith, Michigan manager With 20 men already signed up, this
of the United Press. year's Geneva Y. M. C. A. conference
is expected to draw a large number of
R. Parsons Takes Highland Park Offer delegates. It is expected that as many
Roy M. Parsons, grad., will take a more will hand in their names before
position in Highland Park this sum- the week is over. All men planning
mer as an inspector of children's gard- to attend the conference are urged to
ens. Specializing in landscape design leave their names with the university
has qualified him for the position, Y. M. C. A. at once, in order - that the
which consists of helping to lay out officials may know what size delega-
about 100 gardens, and -supervising tion they can depend upon from the
them when constructed. university.

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SECOND

The Spectacular Dancing Fete*

OBSERVATORY

PERFORMANCE

PE RSEPHO
TONIGHT By University Woman

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