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May 29, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-29

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THE DAILY
OIL BALANCE OF THE YEAR
AILED 75c LOCAL,

The

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE
N OW
-MAILED 755 LO

vn XT- I nA

trt ~-TN

t Ol. .XXV,\o. 174.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 29, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

PRII FV,

Tl

AEHO CLUB'SPLANE
RUI'NED INFIH
Accident Nearly Results Fatally foi
F. E. Loudy, on Eve of
Regatta Exhibition
of Plane
cROWD l)Ol SPECTATORS SEE
PLIN E INTO BARTON PON])
Student Aeronaut Attributes iMisha p
to Tricky 'Gist
of Wind

f

e ,
I ' 1
r

Almost quicker than thought a tria
flight of the Aero club's new hydro-
plane was turned into a serious, and
what seemed for the moment, a fatal
accident when the plane was caught by
a gust of wind, while pilot F. Earl
Loudy, '1E, was sailing along at a
height of 15 feet above the surface of
Barton pond yesterday in preparation
for the flights which were to have tak-
en place this afternoon on the Regat-
ta program.
Boat club committeemen and thirty
or forty spectators had watched the
previous trial trips, which had been
made over the surface of the water,
and some had gone back to work think-
ing that no attempt would be made to
raise the plane as on previous occa-
sions. Suddenly the cry that "he's go-
ing up" was raised and everyone stop-
ped to look. After several very short
jumps the machine was seen to leave
the surface and for a time it looked
as if Loudy had everything in good
control. Then he made what seemed
to be a turn and spectators thought
that he was going to sail back. The
machine swung partially around and
swayed from side to side. Then sud-
denly one wing seemed to be caught
by a forceful wind and before the spec-
tators realized it, the other end had
touched in the water, the whole thing
turned turtle, and crashed to pieces,
with Loudy out of sight beneath the
Water.,
For a brief moment the crowd seem-
ed not to comprehend what a serious
accident had taken place. Everyone
stood still. Then men began to pile
into canoes, and many ran across the
dam and up the western embankment
of the pond to where the remains of
the wreck lay floating in the water.
Spectators feared that Loudy had been
caught beneath the wreckage. Robert
Bennett, '18, was the first man to reach
the scene from the shore, but when he
arrived Loudy had freed himself and
climbed out on top of the plane. Can-
oes came up, taking Loudy to shore.
Loudy's 'explanation of the accident
was that he had thought it best to turn,
but on the turn had been caught by
the gust of wind. He said that he saw
that he would hit the embankment on
the side of the pond so he shot over
his control lever and one of the planes
.lowered, caught in the water and the
next thing he knew was that he real-
ized that the machine was going over
him and he started to swim in the op-
ppsite direction.
All plans for' the flights at the Re-
gatta have been cancelled, but even
before he left the grounds Loudy stated
emphatically that the machine would
be hauled out of the water and repair-
ed and would be ready for use next
fall. The machine had been given to the
Aero club by an organization in De-
troit and was of the hydroplane type.
Several surface trips had been made
during the last week and on one occa-
sion the pilot had glided from the
water and sailed along for fifty feet
before alighting again.
Outstanding Debts Affect O.S.U. Men
Class credit at Ohio State university
will be withheld from all students who
have outstanding debts at the end of
a semester. This ruling applies to
class and organization dues as well as
to personal obligations. Rigid en-
forcement of the rule now would pre-
vent 100 seniors from graduating.

r TODAY
Regatta, Barton pond, 2:30 o'clock.
Water carnival, Barton pond, 7:3
o'clock._
Track meet-All-Fresh vs. M. A. C.
Ferry field, 2:00 o'clock.
Baseball--All-Fresh vs. Polish Semi
Cary, Ferry field, 3:30 o'clock.
Membership dance, Union, 9:00 o'clocl
Tennis-Oberlin vs. Michigan, Ferr
field, 2:00 o'clock.
lSOPHS BURN EFFIGY
ON 1918_CAP NIGHT
r Crowd of 6,000 Gathers in Observator
hollow to Witness Spectacular
Exhibition Despite
Weather
JAMES STRASBURG, '02, FROM
DETROIT, REPRESENTS ALUMNI
Faculty Members and Seniors Address
Yearlings with Words of
Advice
Michigan's freshmen are no more,
As the last green flames from the
burning effigy of the freshman class
died down in Observatory Hollow last
night, the bursting of an aerial bomb
over the assembled crowd signalled
the advance of the class of 1918 into
the ranks of the sophomores.
With the report of the bomb, the
first year men circled the huge bon-
fire which the sophomores had built,
and tossing their freshman caps into
the blaze, re-enacted this most pic-
turesque Michigan tradition.
A steady rain, which fell through-
out the celebration, failed to check the
enthusiasm of the 6.000 people who
gathered to witness the Cap Night cer-
emonly.
The procession, led by the Varsity
band, formed on the campus at 7:45
o'clock. Seniors, juniors, sophomores
and freshmen followed in the order
named, the'special committee of sec-
ond year men under the leadership of
H. Gray Muzzy, '17, burning red fire
all along the line of march.
Harold Schradzki, '15L, as master
of ceremonies, introduced the speak-
ers of the evening, while Carroll B.
Haff, '15L, led the yells. Edward H.
Saer, 15L, urged the freshmen to join
the Michigan Union and keep up Mich-
igan traditions. In stating his feelings
as a senior, he said: "It is natural for
a senior to feel that the university is
not advancing as rapidly as it should,
but I feel that Michigan has kept her
steady course, and it is the duty of
you young sophomores to see that that
course is maintained."
Robert C. Barnum, '15, in advising
the first year men to live up to Mich-
igan traditions as they come, said:
"Do not come back next fall as upper-
classmen. Come as sophomores, and
be splendid sophomores. You will find
yourselves seniors only too soon."
Comparing university life to a ball
game, Ernest F. HIughitt, '15E, said:
"You come to bat as freshmen. If you
get a walk or make a hit, you get on
first base as sophomores. Then you
are sacrificed to second, as juniors.
When, a seniors, you find yourselves
on third, you strive your hardest to
cress the plate. And throughout the
game, you must remember to play fair
and hard."
"Be relevant," was the theme of
Prof. Robert M. Wenley. "Know your
own mind and then stick to it. Think
before you speak, and finally, develop
your personalities."
James Strasburg, '02, of Detroit,
speaking for the alumni, urged that

the student body maintain the old tra-
dition of singing "The Yellow and
(Continued on page 4)

THIRD REGATTA TO
BE[ STAGEDTODATY
Special Furniture City Train to Bring
Out-of-Town People to.
Station about
Noon
DECLARE HENLEY CREW COURSE
AS ONE OF FINEST IN COUNTRY
Competition in Eight, Four, Single and
Double Shells Expected
to Be Keen

Forerunners of the Grand Rli (Courtesy of The Pennsylvanian)
and Detroit rooters and crews, are al- PHILADELPHIA, PA., May 27-
ready pouring into the city, and a spe- Michigan placed four men in five
cial Furniture City train will arrive at events in the qualifying heats of the
the station at 11:12 o'clock this morn- annual intercollegiates held on Frank-
ing in order to have the men .on hand lin field today.. Captain Smith of the
for the third annual regatta of the Wolverines placed in both the sprints,
Boat club, to be staged at 2:30 o'clock being the only Michigan man to enter
this afternoon on Barton pond. more than one contest.
In spite of the cancelling of events The other men from Ann Arbor who
rumored yesterday noon, and in earned the right to compete tomorrow
spite 'of the hydroplane accident, are O'Brien, in the 100-yard dash,
splendid prospects are in sight for the Corbin, in the high hurdles, and Wil-
canoe, swimming, diving, shell racing son, in the pole vault. The disappoint-
and other events. Visitors from the ing showing of the Michigan men is
Detroit and Grand Rapids aquatic or- ~due largely to inexperience.
ganizations declare the Henley crew According to predictions, Cornell
course marked out by the buoys on came out with the largest number of
the Huron to be the finest in the coun- qualifications, 18 men from Ithaca se-
try without exception. curing places. Harvard followed
Competition in the eight, four, doub- closely with 16 and Yale was third
les and single shell from Detroit and with 11. Pennsylvania, who many
Grand Rapids has been especially picked to win the meet, will enter 10
keen,' ever since the national tourna- athletes. The others ranked as fol-
ment at Philadelphia last year where lows: Princeton 8, Dartmouth 6, Mich-
Grand Rapids placed first and Detroit igan 5, Penn State 5, Columbia 4,
third. Maine 3. .
R. C. Jeter, '16E, .chairman of ar- One record went by the boards in
rangements, has made complete prep- the preliminaries, when Bailey of
(Continued on page 4) (Continued on page 4)
FRESH TRACK MEN VARSI-TY TO MEET
I MEET WITH, M.A.CE HOTNNSTA
Yearlings Probably to Lose Support ofI tatch Scheduled Today First Racquet
Loud, Wickersham and Intercollegiate on Ferry Field
"Al" Robinson in Three Years

MICHIGAN PLACES
Captain Harold Smith in Two Events
,with O'Brien, Corbin and Wilson,
Each Winning Right
to Compete
FERRIS AND CROSS FAIL TO
QUALIFY' IN PRELlMINARIES
Lippincott, Penn Star Sprinter, Pulls
Tendon, aking lictory in
220 Possible

Student Publicatiomi Board Meets Toda
Michigan's board in control of stu
dent publications will meet at 10:0
o'clock this morning to consider ap
I pointments to the 1915-'16 Michigan
ensian staff. At this meeting the ne
managing editor and business manag
, er of that publication will probabl
be picked.
Classical Club Elects New Officer
Classical club elected the following
officers at its meeting Thursday after
noon: President, R. M. Carson, '17
vice-president, Myrtle Young, '16; sec
retary, Virginia Straught, '16; treas
urer, R. C. Hunter, '17.
FORGER DETECTED
YON STATE STREEl
Accused, E. L. Goggins Readily. Admit.
ted His Attempt to Pass a Worth-
less Check when
SSusplcloned
POSES AS SENIOR FORESTER,
AND LATER AS FRESH LIT'
Fix Goggin's Bail at $2,000, with.Case
to Come to Trial in Fall
Session
Alleging himself to be a senior for-
ester, and then maintaining that he
was a freshman and enrolled in the
literary college of the university, Ed-
ward L. Goggin, was arraigned on the
charge of passing forged checks on
local merchants yesterday. It was lat-
er found that he is not enrolled in any
.school or college of the university.
Geggin roomed at 515 Cheever court,
and his landlady when questioned, as-
serted that Goggin told her that he
was a student, but that his irregular
habits led her to believe that he was
not. Steps were taken by Goggin
to decorate his room with pennants
and college posters, in playing the
role of student. His room, when
searched, disclosed a quantity of the
goods which he had purchased fraud-
ulently from local merchants. Goggin
bad endeavored to cut the neck bands
from the shirts and to cover with ink
the labels on his shoes, butthese
goods were nevertheless identified by
the tradesmen from whom they had
been obtained.
Goggin was arrested by Deputy
Sheriff Canfield about 3:00 o'clock
Thursday afternoon while trying to
pass a- false check in Wahr's. The
clerk to whom he presented the-check,
had received one in a similar hand-
writing early in December and he had
been warned to be on his guard for
another. On being accused, Goggin
readily admitted his attempted forg-
ery, and also many other offenses of
the same nature. Checks to the
amount of $20 were found in his pock-
ets when arrested, which Goggin had
evidently meant to pass.
Goggin asserted that he was 19
years old, and that hils home was in
Honeoye Falls, N. Y. He claims to.
have come to Ann Arbor last Sep-
tember, intending to work his way
through the university, but when he
lost the job he had secured to earn
his board, he was reduced to the pass-
ing of bad checks.
Malcolm and Co., J. Fred Wuerth,
and Wagner and Co., are the local
merchants stung by Goggin. In court
Goggin said that he did not think
checks cashed by him amounted to
more than $200.
Goggin's bail was fixed at $2,000 and

his case comes to trial at the October
session of the Circuit Court. He is to
be tried on the charges of forging and
uttering worthless paper. When in-
terviewed yesterday afternoon, he
stated that he had written to his fath-
er of his plight, and that he expected'
to be released by next Wednesday.- A
long term in States prison will prob-
ably be meted out to Goggin, as he is
the first of several local offenders to
be apprehended.

-AGGIES HELPLESS
u-
P-
a-
wWITH '515S IN BOX
y Michigan Gets Long Run of An S to 1
Score, with "George" Giving
but Two ilits in
Entire Game
- TEAM FINDS BLAKE MILLER'S
DELIVERY FOR 14 SAFETIES
y- --
- Yesterday's Game Ties Up Series with
Agies; Third Game Staged
Today
EAST LANSING, MICH., May 28.-
George Sisler put on a wonderful ex-
hibition here today, pitching for Mich-
igan when the Aggies lost to the Ann
Arbor nine by an 8 to 1 score.. Sisler
held the Farmers helpless at hat, al-
lowing them but two hits, and the
Michigan star alone scored enough
runs to beat the home team.
Blake Miller faced the Wolverines
in the second game of the season be-
tween Coach Lundgren's and Coach
Macklin's men, but the Michigan nine
seemed to have no trouble in solving
his delivery. .The former game must
have given the Ann Arbor lads a good
line on the Lansing b'oy's stuff, and
. they found Miller for 14 hits.
Brandell's shift to the outfield seem-
ed to exercise a good 'effect on the
former short-stop's batting eye, Bran-
dell hitting for three singles out of
five times at bat. Waltz also chalked
three hits to his credit, getting safeties
three out of four times at bat. Maltby
batted .500 in the game, getting two
hits in four times up. The nine had a
big day with the stick, only three men
failing to hit safely at least once.
Sisler was the Michigan star, get-
ting four hits out of five times at bat,
besides scoring three runs, stealing
two bases, and allowing the Aggies
but two hits in the nine innings. In-
cidentally he struck out 10 M. A. C.
batters. In addition to this he started
a double play, Sisler to Benton to
Maltby.
The count for the season stands even
between Michigan and M. A. C., each
nine having won a game in the series.
Today's conflict will be the deciding
one of the three, and promises to be a
fight in earnest. Ferguson is the man
who is slated to pitch for the Michi-

LANSING MEN MAY UPSET DOPE
Crippled by injuries and scholastic
troubles, Michigan's All-Fresh track
team faces a real struggle in its an-
nual meet with M. A. C. today.
"Al" Robinson tried himself out for
a. short time in the sprints yesterday,
but was greatly hampered by the rheu-
matism which has been his hoodoo of
late. Unless the captain's form is
much improved today, it is quite like-
ly that Doe May will not let his star
man run.
At the last moment, Wickersham,
who has been showing good form in
the hurdles, developed a bad knee, and
may not be able to appear against the
Farmers. The Aggies have been com-
ing strong in the hurdles all year, and
the dope figures to their favor in this
event.
Scholastic difficulties have descend-
ed upon Loud, who is the best man the
first year men have in the shot-put,
and he may be forced to remain out of
the competition. His loss will be
deeply felt by the yearlings, in case
the faculty ban is not removed.
With three stars out of the All-
Fresh line-up, the men from Lansing
have the best chance in years to upset
dope and precedent, and win a meet
from the freshmen. If they do suc-
ceed, it will be the first aggregation
from that city to turn the trick on a
first year' track team. The Aggies
are coming to Ann Arbor with a strong
team, one which would be dangerous
if the freshmen were in first class con-
dition, and revenge for past defeats
would be more than acceptable to
them.
The meet today will start promptly
at 2:00 o'clock. Officials have been
Continued on page 6)v

OBERLIN IlS STRONG SQUAD
In the first Varsity tennis match
that has been played on the Ferry field
courts in more than three years, Ober-.
lin will meet the Wolverine aggrega-
tion at 2:00 o'clock this afternoon.
The Ohioans should furnish the
Michigan tennis fans the best tennis
that has been played in this part of
the country in a long time. They
were one of the two teams to beat
Michigan on the eastern trip. They
caught Captain Reindel's men, how-
ever, at the beginning of the journey,
when the Wolverines had not had
much competition.,
Since then the team has profited
very much from the experience gained
on the trip through the east, and is
hoping for a victory over Oberlin. All
the men are in good siĀ± ve, with the
possible exception of Crawford, who
twisted his ankle in the match with
the Navy at Annapolis.t
Wilder, the star of the Ohio teaTn,
is a Californian and is rated among
the best of the younger players in the
Golden State. The interscholastic
championship of California fell his
way more than once, and according
to Captain Reindel, he will show as
fine a brand of tennis as will ever
have been seen here. He beat the
Michigan leader without much diffi-
culty in their last meeting.
The other members of the Oberlin
team, the Andrus brothers and Dissell,
are rated well and should make the
Michigan players go at top speed.
Mack, who played third on the eastern
trip, proved himself valuable at that
time by winning all but two matches.
It is expected that his work will be the;
feature of the Michigan performance
today.

gan nine, while Weeder
work on the mound for
The box score and,
today's game follow:
Micigan
AB
Sheehy, m 4........4
McQueen, 2b.... 5
Sisler, p...........5
Benton, c..........4
Brandell, f......... 5
Labadie, rf..........5
Maltby, lb........4
Waltz, 3b,.,...4
Shivel, ss3...... 3

will probal
the Aggies.
summaries

R
0
0
1
1
0
2
1
0

H
0
0
4
0
3
1
2
3
1

Totals...........39 8 14
M. A. G

AB R
Fick, ss............ 3 0
Thomas, m.......... 4 0
Williams, 2b........4 0
Fuller, 3b..... ...4 0
Clark, rf............4 0
Frimodig, 1b........2 0
Bibbins, c........... 2 1
Hood, lf...........1 0.
Miller, p...........2 0
Totals...........26 1
Score by innings:
12 345678
Michigan .0 1 2 0 1 1 1 1
M.A.C. ..0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Summaries-three base

H COP
0 2
0 3
0 2
0 2
1 1'
1 1
0 6
0 1
0- 0
2 271
9-R
1-8
0-1
hlits, S

A
3
0
4.
1
0
0.
3
1
1
13

0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

HE
14 2
2 2
SisIer

2; sacrifice hits, Shivel; stolen bases,
Sisler 2,, Benton, Wrandelli; double
plays, Sisler to Benton to Maltby;
struck out, by Sisler 10, by Millr 7;
bases on balls, by Sisler 5, ,y Miller 2;
wild pitches, Miller; time of game, 1
hour 50 minutes; umpire, Ferguson.

hour 50 minutes; umpire, Ferguson.

TO DAY TODAY
vs. FreshmenDual Track Meet Polish Seminary vs. Freshmen Beal"
Ferry Field - - 2:00 P. M. Ferry Field - - - 3:30 P. Ma

I

_I

Oberlin vs. Michigan Tennis Match - -

Admission to all events 50c'

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