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May 23, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ich igan

Daily

31AILlD

SUIBSCRI

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ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 23, 1915.

PDR: P.P.'A~

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TODAY

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Re-
ian

NEW GYM PROJECT
TABLED BY BOARD

SOPHS YIELD HARD
PUSH BALL BATTLE

k

RAI\NPEVENTS IBALL (IAHEAT1
t'NIVItITY OF PENiNSYLVSANIA
Mihgall Scheduled to Win by Dope-
stern; Squ1,ad Leales for A11nn
Arbor Today

by Dpo ofI

Dr. Edgar P. Hill speaks on "The'
demption of The City," Presbyter
church, 7:30 o'clock.

L
AL

ormer Rec..
es by

Rev. F. B. Bachelor speaks on, "The
Child's Religious Life," First Bap-
tist church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. A. W. Stalker speaks on, "Faith
for Today," First M. E. church,
10:30 o'clock.
Mr. Lloyd C. Douglas speaks on, "Thee
Love-Song of an Unromantic Man,"
First Congregational church, 10:30
o'clock.
Justice Hugo Pam, '92, speaks on, "The
Schoolhouse as an Agency for Social
Service," Newberry hall, 8:00
o'clock.
Rabbi C. S. Levi speaks before the
Jewish Student congregation, Mc-

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I

Owing to Lack of Funds, Regent fo
Places Proposed Waterman.
Addition Plans on
Table
NAMES MRS. GATES AS SOCIAL
HEAD OF NEWBERRY HA
Recommends Holding of Michigan I
at Pananma-Pagcfie
Exposition
Owing to the lack of funds, the p

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LI
ro-

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A-

Fresh Win Spring Games by Narrow
Margin of 4 to 3, as Result
of Push Ball
Contest
SOPHOMORES VICTORS IN TWO
OUT OF THREE RELAY RACES
Several Undergraduates Exhausted in
Hotly Contested Battle
for Goal
By defeating the sophomores in the

PHILADELPHIA, PA., May 22.-
Pennsylvania and Michigan were pre-
vented from meeting on the baseball

*

.8

CHILDREN SING
CLOSE oFES
22jd Annual Musical Fete (
with Yesterday's Progn
in Which Leonora
Allen Stars
KLINE, JOHNSON, STANLE
WHITEHILL MEMORABLI
Harrison Charms in Afterm
pearance; Public School Y
sters in "Crusade"

.. 9
..5
.4
1

*:
*:
*:
*:
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*:

Millan hall, 6:45 o'clock.
Rev. R. S. Loring speaks on, "The
Western Confere'nce Meeting and
the New Type of Liberal Religion,"
Unitarian church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. G. WS. Knepper speaks on, "A
Glimpse of the Apostolic Church,"
Church of Christ, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. L. A. Barrett speaks on, "The
Will to Think," Presbyterian church,
10:30 o'clock.

i

THURSDAY DATE OF
CAMPUS ELECTIONl

*1

posed Waterman gymnasium addition
and the first greenhouse unit were ta
bled by the board of regents. Plans
for both structures had previously
been drawn up and accepted.
The board approved the appointmeni
of Mrs. Erie L. Gates, of 701 Johnson
street, Bay City, as social head of
Newberry residence hall for universi-
ty' women. Miss Clara Hunt, of the
Michigan Agricultural College, was
appointedbusiness manager of the
new residence.
Further action was taken in regard
to the plans for the new library build-
ing, when the board employed Regent
W. L. Clements to appoint an archi-
tect for the new structure.
A communication was received from
Mr. L. C. Anderson, in which he urg-
ed the university to hold a Michigan'
Day at the Panama-Pacific exposition,
the date to be set by the president.
This was referred to the president,
with power to act.
Leave of absence for commence-
ment week was granted Dean Victor
C. Vaughan, so that he might be pres-I
ent at the national convention of the
American Medical association, of
which he is president, to be held in
San Francisco in June. Prof. T. C.
Trueblood, head of the oratory depart-
ment, was given a leave of absence for
the same time, that he might attend
the national convention of the Teach-
ers of Public Speaking, at San Fran-
cisco.
The history department petitioned
the regents to purchase certain files
of Charleston, S. C., newspapers, be-
ginning in the year 1799, which are
considered quite valuable from a his-
torical standpoint,
The board authorized the purchase
of 80 acres of land at Bogardus camp,
the price paid being $4.00 an acre.

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n hard-fought pushball contest yester-
- day, the freshmen won the spring
s games by the narrow margin of 4
Yto 3.
The score before the pushball fight
t commenced stood three to three, the
freshmen having won two of the three
ftugs across the Huron Friday after-
noon, which the sophs offset by win-
ning two of the three obstacle relay
races. Both the first and second re-'
lays went to the soph teams by wide
margins, while in the third race, the
fresh were victors.
From the first, the first year men
had the advantage in the pushball con-
test by reason of superior numbers,
and the ball remained in sophomore
territory during most of the contest.
So hotly fought was the event that
neither side scored a goal. One' point
was awarded the freshmen, however,
for having the ball in sophomore ter-
ritory at the close of the fight.
Several of the men were exhausted,
and after the contest the ground was
covered with pieces of clothes and
shoes. Howard E. Ramsey, '17E, was
hurt seriously, remaining unconscious
for about 10 minutes due to being
trampled on. He was taken to the uni-
versity hospital.
Three men were treated at the uni-
versity health service for face wounds,
one having a slash above the right
eye and the other two having the noset
punctured, said to have been caused1
by being stepped upon by some con-
testant wearing spiked shoes. .Among
the others who were knocked out dur-
ing the course of the contest are Julio
Luzeunarus, '17, J. H. Sanders, '17L,,
Constantine D. Tripolitis, '17E, W. C.
Gernt, '17E, H. D. Biery, '18, F. R. Bol-f
ten, '18E.*+

MfiCQlGAN

diamond by a steady rain which start-
ed after both teams had barely finish-
ed warming up. The drizzle started
at 3:00 o'clock and continued for the
remainder of the afternoon.
The Michigan team leaves for Ann
Arbor tomorrow, and will reach the
college town in time to attend Monday
classes.
Michigan was slated by th'e dope-
sters to win today's game, having ev-
erything in its favor, since Penn's
pitchers are still a practically un-
known quantity, and Sisler was the
Wolverines' choice.
SELECT SQUAD FOR,
COILEGIA-TE MEE1T
Lapsley, Huntington and Corbin (,ain
Right to Trip by Showing
. in Trials

STRONG IN 1)ASHES

Will Be Conducted within Corridors
University Hall from 10:00
to 5:30 O'clock
WOJEN EXPECTED TO BALLO

of
)T
ld
1i-
ell

-:,

Election Day will be he
ay, in the corridors of Un
1, the polls remaining op

from 10:00 o'clock in the morning un-
til 5:30 o'clock in the afternoon. The
election this year will apply to the
Michigan Union, the Boat club, board
in control of student publications and
the athletic association.
All university students may vote
for members of the board of control of
student publications, and all having
athletic books will be eligible to vote
for the athletic association offices.
Members of the Union and Boat club
will be eligible to vote for the officers
of their respective organizations. The
student councilmen will act as judges
and have general supervision.
In a circular letter, being sent out
by thescouncil, it ispointed out that
university women are "entitled, ex-
pected and requested" to vote for the
student publication members and ath-
letic association offices, in case they

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Following the trials in the low hur-£
dles, 100-yard dash and quarter mile
yesterday, Coach Farrell announced
that the following squad of 12 men
would be taken to the eastern inter-
collegiates.
Captain Sinith, O'Brien La>sley,
Huntington, Ufer, Carroll, Fox, Corbin,
Ferris, Wilson, Cross and Donnelly.
The coach staged trials in the low
hurdles and 100-yard dash after the
interscholastic. Corbin won over the
low barriers by a comfortable margin
with Crumpacker finishing second. In
the century, Captain Smith broke the
tape with Harold O'Brien second and
Lapsley third.
It had been the original intention
of the coachi to select only two sprint-
ers, but Lapsley's showing pleased the
track boss, -and the trio will make the

With a 'powerful, yet s
treatment of Pierne's "Chil
sade," the 22nd annual M
of the school of music was
night in Hill auditorium.
Miss Leonora Allen sang
Alain with a wealth of fe
clear technique. Miss 01
rendition of the role of
carefully given and reveal(
nical and musical skill of t
order. MHiss Ada >Grace J(
singing the short role of t
showed a keen appreciatic
ical values and a certain
color. The quartet part, su
Johnson, Miss Maude. Kleyn
ice B3liton and Miss Nora
unified and charmingly shad
Mr. Clarence Whitehill, s
duel parts of the sailor and
from on high," made of th
forceful and moving presen
Lambert Murphy, the narrat
his power again and again
voice soared above the forte
in the orchestra.
To Prof. Albert A. Stanh
university school of music
the credit for an impressive
tion of the various units. I
a perfect attack and an
shading, improvised as the
soloists, choristers, childre:
chestra necessarily was.
Three choruses, compose
dren from the Ann Arbo
schools, supported the art
sang with a finish that she
ful training,
In yesterday afternoon's
miscellaneous program was
Llewellyn L. Renwick being
organ recital, and Miss Marg
es and Mr. Theod ore Han
group of songs.
Miss Keyes sang with gr
iveness, Bizet's aria, "Ave M
a violin obligato. Mr. Theo(
rison offered a group of mo
ing Italian and German son
ing with Strauss'magnifica
lie." By his thoughtful it
tions, full of feeling, he pr
self to be a most popular
Mrs. Minnie Sherrill playe
companiments with great
ness.

TI
CL

[omas c, Scott rf, Marris If, Nichols

F

rES LITES WIN FROW FRESH
MEDIC TEAM IN NO-HIT OGAME

I I

Medics Come Back in Second Game"
and Dowli Junior Laws in 7 to
6 Contest

I

I

led voters.

- I

U B MEMBERS WORK
A TTA PREPARATIONS

Aids and Detroit Clubs Strive
w Honors; Committeemen
Prepare Grounds

I

Championship crews, a flying ma-
chine, spectacular swimmers and div-
ers, Varsity music and gorgeous floats
'epresenting campus societies are
among the featu-res which Boat club
members are preparing for the annual
regatta program, Saturday afternoon
and night on Barton pond.
Harold J. Smith, '16E, in general
charge of the affair, Grover Farns-
worth, of the Detroit Boat club, and
several local committeemen spent yes-
terday afternoon in superintending the
work of setting buoys for the Henley
crew course, the building of piers and
a lift for carrying canoes over the dam
(Continued on page 5)

Fresh medics obtained an even break
in class baseball yesterday, being de-
feated by the fresh lits in the first con-
test, and downing the junior laws in
the second affair.,
Ohlmacher, the fresh lit pitcher,
held the medics to no hits, hurling the
best brand of baseball that has been
seen in the interclass games this sea-
son. Reem for the same team played
a star game around the third cushion.
Line-up and score:
Medics-Bowman c, Marschall 2b,
Fellows ss, Funk 3b, Hirschland 1b,
Shutes cf, Smith rf, Ruedeman If, Gal-
braith p.
Fresh lits-Martin c, Britton ss,
Reem 3b, Lambert 2b, Ohlmacher p,
Loeb rf, Sharpe cf, Hatch If.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 R H E
Medics .......0 0 0 0 0 1 0-1 0 1
Fresh lits ....2 0-0 0 0 0 *-2 3 1'
Coming up from behind, the medics
vanquished the junior laws in the
second struggle. The hard hitting of .
both teams featured. Line-up and
score:.
Medics-Bowman c, Shutes 1b, Mar-
schall 2b, Fellows ss, Ruedeman ef,
Hyde If, Funk 3b, Darnall rf, Vollmey-

'

1234 56
Medics ,.- 0 0 1 3 0 0
Junior laws .4 0 0 0 0 0
Tomorrow's games are
soph engineers vs. junior'
mie vs. junior dents, and
vs. senior laws.

Miller and Alexander Make Stellar
Battery, While Teammates
Out'it Opponents

1918 MEN TAKE SECOND GAME
OFF DETROIT UNIVERSITY NINE

7 R HE
3-7 10 3
2-6 7 5
as follows:
laws, phar-
fresh dents

_ _.._ _T .

Playing a consistent game of ball,
the Michigan freshmen took the sec-
ond game from Detroit University in
a 6 to 4 battle, yesterday afternoon.
At no time during the contest was the
result in doubt, the yearlings playing
superior ball throughout.
"Rails" Miller hurled a stellar nine
innings for his teammates, striking
out 11 men and permitting no men to
walk to the initial sack. Alexander
caught well, and Norton was easily the
star in the hitting end of the game,
getting three wallops in four times
up.

t
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ff.
t
e
13
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trip.
The trials were held in the mornisng
for the quarter-milers, and Hunting-
ton breasted the tape first after a hard
fi ht all the way, thus earning the
right t~o make the trip.
Although Michigan's chances do not
appear as bright as they did last sea-
son, the Wolverines should make con-
siderable impression upon the score
sheet. Michigan is particularly strong
in the dashes, and should score heav-
ily, in the 100, and 220. Both O'Brien
and Lapsley are stronger at the short-
er distance, although the captain pre-
fers the 220.
The eastern intercollegiate will be
faster than ever this season in prac-
tically every event, but Coach Farrell
expects that this squad will make ua
creditable showing. Seven of the 12
men are sophomores and will compete
in the annual classic for the first time.
The coach figures that the men who do
not place will secure invaluable ex-'
perience which should strengthen the
squad for next year. Ferris and Laps-

PLA'N PROGRAM Fl
ANNUALCAP NIG
H. R. Schradzki, '15L, Made Mas
Ceremonies for Traditional
Event
TO CONSTRUCT SPEAKERS' S'T

ley are the only two on the list
will graduate this spring.

whol

Bialoskey 2b.......4 1
Alexander c.... .4 1
Miller 'p..........3 0
* Ipple If.........1 0

i

0 1 1 0
1 11 1 0
0 0 3 0
1 0 0 0

lc

lc

The box score and summaries fol-

TOTALS.........36 6;10 27 6 4
* Ran for Baribean in 5th.
Un iversity c fDetroit

ow

w:

.1

afternoon; at 2:00 o'clock, first
rsday morning; at 3:00 o'clock,
Wednesday morning.
iday-any hour, second Wednes-

i

11

I

er p.
Jpnior laws-Martin 3b, McCall p,
Brownell ss, Rowan 2b, Stevens 1b,

:f

Baribeau
Field lb
Norton m
Walterho
Piggot rf
Riddle 3b

Michigan All-Fresh
AB*'R H
3b .........4 1 0
. .. .. . . .... 4 0 1
......... 4 1 3'
use ss...... 4 1 1
. . . ........4 1 2
a& I . . ......4 0 I

PO
0
9
2
1
0
3

AB

A
1
0
0
0
0

E
"4
0
0
0
1
U

Parker m ..........4
Marshke 2b........4
LeFevre c........... 4
Dacey ss ...........4
Hester lb..........4
Bayard 3b..... . .4
Bordeaux if .......4
Bateson rf.... .. . 2
Arntz p...........3

R H PO A E
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 5 1 2
0 1 5 2 0
1 1>2-1 1
1 0 6' 0 3
1 0 4 1 0
1 0 0 0 0
0 1 2 0 0
0 0 . 0 3 1

Harold R. Schradzki, '15L, will b(
master of ceremonies for Cap Night
when the traditional event occur:
Friday night in Observatory Hollow
the new location selected for this
year.
The program of speakers has not
yet been fully decided upon, but will
irclude two faculty, two studeni
speakers, and probably one represen-
tative of the alumni. An effort will
be made to secure either Judge James
0. Murphin, '95L, of Detroit, or "Jim'
Strasburg, the favorite perennial
toastmaster at the football smokers
tendered by the Detroit alumni.
As an innovation this year, a
speakers' stand, 10 or 15 feet in height,
will be constructed, since Observatory
Hollow does not provide so good a
natural amphitheater as Palmer field,
the usual setting in the past.
H. Gray Muzzy, '17, has been ap-
pointed chairman of a sophomore
committee of 20 men to collect and
build the big bonfire in which the
freshmen will cast their grey caps,
following the long snake dance which
will be held again as last year. The
committee will meet at the Union at
10:00 o'clock this morning to make
further arrangements.

I.

corning.
urday-any hour, second Thurs-
fternoon.
day-at 4:0 'to 6:00 o'clock,
d Thursday morning.
,wing 4, 5, 4a, 5a, first Thursday

.40w0
Dr. EDGAR P. HILL
Of Chicago
Will Speak at the Presbyterian Church
on the
"Redemption of the City"
TONIGHT AT 7:3U
He will speak to the Young Men at 12 o'clock

TOTALS........33 4 3 24 8 71

Score by innings:
U. of.).........0)1)
A ll-Fresh .. .. . ..0 1 0

) 0 0 3 0 0-4

irst Saturday afternoon,
y morning, secondfuTies-
and second Thursday

Suimmaries: Three base hit-Bate-
son; .stolen bases, Baribeau, Norton
Piggot, Riddle, Alexander; sacrifice
hits-Miller; base on balls-by Arntz;
hit by pitched ball-by Miller, Bate-
son; time of game-1 hour 50 min-
utes; umpire-Kimuzey.1

iod begins Mon-

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