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May 16, 1915 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-16

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TRtA MIOHIGAN DAILY

[Y

FESTIVAL

SAY199,209,219,22,1

FOUR DAYS

SIX CONCE

I I

First Festival Concert
Wednesday Evening May 19, 8:00 o'clock
Soloists
Margaret er,'Contralto
Clarence hite ill, Baritone

Third Festival Concert

Fifth Festival Conc
Saturday Afternoon, May 22, 2:30

Friday Afternoon, May 21

2:30 o'clock

Soloists:
Margaret Keyes, Contralto
CHICAGO 0.1.RA COMPANY
Harold Bauer, "The Master Pianist"
'R cE*iRC A. SrrocK, Conductor

Soloists :

Margaret Keyes, Conti
A ETIsiVAL, FAVORITE '
Theodore Harrison, DB
AN AME RICAN TRAINID IN LUROPIE
Llewellyn L. R.enwi4
PROMINENT CON ERI ORGANSlT

S'r\ I '>A j) 'rc K,( oidic.r

PROGRAM.
Overture-"Leonore," Opus 72, No. 3
Ari a-" Penelope Weaving a Garment," from "()dysseus'
Miss Keyes
Concerto for Pianoforte, A minor, Opus 57
Allegro affettuoso; Intermezzo; Allegro vivace
Mr. Bauer

Beethoven
Bruch
Schumann

PROGRAM

Pl1 RA l

"America" lby Chorus, ()rclicstra and audience

( verture to "()heron"
Aria from "Thais" (Alexandria
Mr. Whitehill
Symphonic Poem, "The Sireus"
ria of Fides from "1Le Prophet"
Miss Ober
intermission
Overture-F-antasia "Hamlet Opus 67a

Webcr
Massenet
Gliere
Meverbeer

Intermission

Praeludium .
Fuga Cr-omatica
Evening Song'
Pavane

EIrwin Lendv
A. Laido
1I. C: Bairsto
Bernard fohnst

Symphony No. z, C minor, Opus 68
Un poco sostenuto-Allegro; Andante sostenuto;
Un poco allegretto e grazioso; Adagio-Pi andante;
Alegro non troppo ma con brio

Brahms

Mr. Renwick

Aria-"Agnus Dei"

Bi

Miss Keyes

CIOVAN N I

Sonata No. 6 .
Allegro Moderato; Andantino
Theme and Variations

Filippo Cap a
Espressivo;

A 'scha a, u skey

Aria of Katharine from "The Taming of the
Shrew" . . . . Goetz
Miss Ober

ARTI

ELLi

Siegfried in the Forest, from "Siegfried"
WAotan's Farewell and Magic Fire Scene,
"Die \WalkirIe" r
Mr. tithitehill

)Wagner
f rom
Wagner

Leading Tenor, Metropolitan Opera Company

Mr. Renwick
Songs-(a) Lungi
(b) Che fiero Costumeh
(c) Der Neugierige
(d) Caecile
Mr. Harrison
Arcadian Idyll
Serenade Musette; Solitude
Scherzo

Carlo Gallon
Giovanni Legren,
Franz Schubei
. Richard Straus
Ed win ,Lemari

WILL SING FRIDAY EVENING,

..

TEN years ago, in a little village near the well-known
northern Italian town of Padua, the best musician
in the little local band was the first clarinet
player, young Giovanni Martinelli. He played the in-
strument so well that his services were constantly in
demand in the neighboring towns and villages. Some
times he sang at the social gatherings of the country
folk, and there were nny who thought that he was
almost as good a singer as a clarinet player. When
the time arrived for his military service, his talent be-
came known in his regiment and instead of having to
handle a musket, he was given an important position in
the regimental band. Th'e bandmaster took an interest
in him and fortunately beard him sing. At once he
recognized his natural vocal gift, remarking to him:
-"Why, young man, it is your voice that you should
devote your attention to, for you will make more money
with it than you ever would with your clarinet." And
to prove his faith in Martinelli, the bandmaster pro-
ceeded to instruct him privately in the art of singing.
After his military service was completed, he spent
several years of hard work before venturing to appear
in public. What might be called his debut was made at,
a concert in Milan where Rossini's "Stabat Mater" was
sun-. He must have made something of a sensation,
this young and absolutely unknown village tenor. At
all events the critic of the leading Milan paper referring
to him said that when he sang the candanza at the end
of the "Cujus Animam" he reminded old timers of the
great Mario.
Some months later he made his operatic debut at the
Dal Verme Theatre in Milan in "Ernani" with distinct
success. It won him an engagement for Covent Garden,
London, and Monte Carlo. At both opera houses he was
hailed as "the coming great Italian tenor."
In November, 1913, Mr. Martinelli sang for the first
time at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York,
where the world's most merciless musical critics ac-
cepted him with unusual favor:
"He is a splendid, clear, resonant organ."--New York
Tribune.
"Mr. Martinelli's voice has the charm of youth. It is
fresh and unspoiled."-New York Herald.
"Mr. Martin.elli sang Rhadames in 'Adia,' winning in
the Nile scene a veritable triumph."-New York Tribune.
"His voice is that rarest of vocal treasures, a per-
feet tenor."-Philadelphia Bulletin.
"Mr. Martinelli sang finely, with the plentitude of
vigorous youth and the training of the true artist. His
high tones are round and full and safe. He sang with
artistic feeling and the technical knowledge that will
win for him his place among the finest tenors of his
generation."-Philadelphia Public Ledger.
Recently Mr. Martinelli created the role of Lefebvre
in Giordano's latest opera "Madame Sans-Gene," elicit-
ing such comments as these:

"Giovanni Martinelli carried off the honors among
the members of the cast."-New York Press.
"He possesses temperament without limit, and at
Saturday's performance literally bubbled over with it
in the Puccini and Leoncavallo selections. His is a
voice of great dramatic intensity, with an abundance of
high ringing tiotes, clear and penetrating in quality."-
Boston Advertiser.
"Mr. Martinelli, who hitherto had sung here only in
opera, is in appearance, in carriage, in his entrances
and exits the traditional tenor, sure of himself, and sure
of the boisterous applause that inevitably follows a dis-
play of musical passion and resonant high notes."-
Boston Herald.
' "He is easily the most important addition to the
roster of the Metropolitan in a number of years. His
voice has great beauty, and he sings with an ease that
enhances this beauty of tone."-New York Journal.
Mr. Martinelli also achieved a great triumph in the
revival of "I1 Trovatore," under the direction of Arturo
Toscanini:
"Mr. Martinelli was a fine Troubador, both for the
youthful ardor of his acting and his excellent singing.
After the Di quella pira' in the third act he was re-
called nearly a dozen times."-New York Times,
"'Di quella pira' was most brilliantly done, but Mar-
tirielli was really at his best in the dungeon scene of
the final.act."-New York Herald.
"Particular praise should go to Giovanni Martinelli;
he made use of the mezza-voce it was not suspected he
possessed. Moreover, lie sang with finish, breadth of
style and enthusiasm."-New York World.
"Martinelli, who gave a manly, forceful and finely
felt impersonation of Manrico, evoked the most tumult-
uous demonstration. After the Di quella pira' aria he
answered at least ten curtain calls. His portrayal stood
on a high artistic plane from every point of view."-
New York Press,
Later Mr. Martinelli sang Don Jos6 in "Carmen" at
the Metropolitan Opera House for the first time, on
March 18, 1915, when the critics said:
"The youthful tenor had much in his favor-a fine,
buoyant presence, ,a brilliant voice and good dramatic
abilities, He sang the aria with fine sentimental ex-
pression and his voice faithfully mirrored the text,
while his delivery was so charged with sincerity and
intensity that at the end of the aria the large audience
broke into spontaneous applause, and at the close of the
act called him before the curtain many timies. His por-
trayal of the desperate Don Jose in the final scene of the
opera was thrilling."-New York Herald.
"There was much to praise in the young tenor's
debut. He sang with expression, with passion and with
continence of tone. Rarely has Don Jose been acted
with such truth, such pathos, such tragedy as Signor
Martinelli here displayed."-New York Tribune.

Evening Bells and Cradle Song
Toccata

W. C. McFarl
Faul

Mr. Renwick.

ALBERT A. STANLEY
Musical Director of the Festival
(Wedmesday, Thursday and Saturday Evenings)

Second Festival Concert
Thursday Evening, May 20, 8:00 o'clock
Soloists:
Freida Hempel
LEArDNG COtORAINO SOPR No, MET'ROPOLITAN
OPERA COMPANY

Olive Kline
WF'JL-KNOWN SQIPRANQ

FREDERICK STOCK
Conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra
(Wednesday, Thursday and Friday Evenings, and Friday Afternoon)
Sixth Festival Concert
Saturday Evening, May 22, $:00 o'clock
The Children's Crusade
BY PIRNE
A MusIcA LEGEND IN POUR AcTs, EMPLOYING ADULT
CHiRUS, CHILDREN'S CHORUS, ORCHESTRA
AND SOLOISTS.
CAST

Fourth Festival Concert

Theodore Harrison
TS'r IN GUISi 11)BARITONE

Friday Evening, May 21

8:00 o'clock

TE CHI-ORAL UNION
Boys' CHoRus
CHicAGO ORCHESTRA
STIA NLIEY A NDI S'I'(CK, Conduct )rs

Soloist:
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI
LEADING TENOR, METROPOLITAN OPERA COMPANY
PROGRAM
Overture-"In Spring Time," Opus 36 . .
E TLucevan Le Stelle (Tosca) . . . . . . . .
Signor Martinelli
Largo, from Symphony No. 5, E minor, Opus 95 '(New World)

Goldmark

Allys
Alain
The Mother
The Narrator

Miss OLIVE KLIN, Soprano
Miss LEONORA ALLEN, Soprano
Miss ADA GRACE JOHNSON; Soprano
MR. LAMbERT MURPHY, Tenor

. .

PROGRAM

Cantata, "The New Life"
Op. 9

(La Vita

Nuova)
Wolf-Ferrari

FOR SoOT, CHORUS AND ORCh ESTRA

Racconto di Rodolfo

(La Boheme)
Signor Martinelli

Dvorak
Puccll
Delius

A Sailor
The Voice From on High

I

Intermission
Overt ure---"Der Sch auspiel di rektor"
Aria "Oueen of the Night," from
Miss Prieda Hempel

Four Women

MR. CLARENCE
WHITEHILL, Baritone

}

Miss ADA GRACE JOHNSON
MiSs MAUDV KLEYN
MIsS ALICE BLITON
Miss NORA HUNT

"Life's Nance"

Atozart
"Magi r
llomart

Intermission

Suite "Piemontesi"
(a) Rustic Dance
(b) Carnival
Celeste Aida (Aida)

Silaigaglia

MEN AND WOMEN cW FLANDERS; CHORUS SERAPICUS
THE CHORAL UNION
THREE CHILDREN'S CHORUSES FROM ANN ARBOR
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

"On the Shores of Sorrento," from Op. 1
A ria-"lrnani ilvolali" from "brnani''
iMiss l eempel

1trrlus

Signor Martinelli

Verdi
Casella

Overture-"Academiic Festival."

Op. 80

Rhapsody, "Italia"

MR. ALBERT A. STANLEY, Conductor

e

an's

Greatest

Must

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