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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 14, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

_ . of w.

OR HARD

a snappy practice
rved to prepare the
1 team for a hard
The yearling team
:hard Lake Saturday
he Polish Seminary
of no mean caliber
hem.
,ke crowd have had
g the last few years
t teams around De-
contest is expected
the Saturday game
have an opportunity
on Ferry field.

FORESTERS' PACK TRAIN GOES
OUT FOR FIELD DAY AT NOON
Forestry students will leave at 12:00
o'clock this noon for their annual field
day, which will be held on the forestry
farm. The pack train will start from
the economics building and will pro-
ceed directly to the farm. Saturday
will be spent in demonstrations and
races with a possible chopping contest.
On Sunday exhibits will be shown.
About 50 or 60 are expected to attend.

R OI

1.
,,

ikes Position in Detroit
-y, '15E, has accepted a
Smith, Hinchman &
icting engineers in De-
I start work with the
He will return to the
une to graduate with his

Michiganensian Gets Worthless Check
Ann Arbor merchants are not the
only victims of the bad check outrage.
Yesterday the management of the 1915
Michiganensian had returned from the
bank a check signed with a fictitious
name. The check was made out for
$2.50, the price of the year book, and
was signed with the name "C. K. Gor-
man." Upon investigation, the bus-
iness manager of the publication found
that no such person was a member of
the university, or a resident of Ann
Arbor.

lfie ivell-dreessed young man Ivalks with his chest
thrown out and his chin up; feeling his superiority without
thinking it.
And remember this: to be well dressed is not to

be foppish or dandyfied.

The really well-dressed

young man is attired in good taste.
It is for men who want to buy

Clothes

of

I'

b~ite

Character and Good Taste that this shop is conducted.
If there was ever a spring season when we were
better equipped to serve your apparel needs than now
we have no record of it--for here you will find the
new shirts, hosiery, neck-wear, hats, and incidentals
to a man dress in such variety that your personal
taste is bound to be, met.
It is a good thing to "drop in" once in while if
only to keep posted on style.
BAUMGARTNER
YOUNG MEN'S SHOP

I

I.

11

11

GRAND RIVER AVENUE

Real Year
Round Comfort
you're going to
choke your leg-
enough to keep

AT

WASHINGTON BLVD.

OK tells you why
VER BIND. It can't
fts on the socks just

DETROIT

erized, 25c; double grip, 35c; silk, 50c:
At your dealer's
FROST CO., Makers, Boston, Mass.

/3 5

a Jv

ti 4~

,u)

l

iS ad. pub- $500 wiflbe 1? dto h c °") the stc r: : .v, sruteu
led in the $500 .tbeet , d.!4v ee
iaA ets- publish we "iB pFa . h v: ~ our AC. if
Conet i5the desict:ytur iac. ?NCB o
ntet, Pize will Le awarded baea; ;, . a rTa._prom.
k of Mr. A. L, in"t O"der i ,;. -Lf. :'. rAdt.'. s,
ick,Dartmiouth kdectric Co., and J. G Forer e aij,trrtiac of rAdt'".
tiseng & Selling. t
lege. f &
FAIM A 3132 iftl Avc, New Y~r!c City
"ECJR it . m -- -
L-ionteWS 71B

FOR SECOND ROUND
Race Narrows to Include Leaders and
Runners-Up in Schools and
Colleges
FIRST GAMES START SATURDAY
With the completion of the first
round of interclass baseball, the race
for campus championship now narrows
down to the leaders and runners-up of
the various schools and colleges. A
new schedule has just been arranged
to cover the final elimination series.
The freshmen of the literary college
have come through without the loss
of a single game, and by defeating the
sophomore team have forced the sec-
ond-year men to take second place.
In the Law School a peculiar situation
has arisen owing to the fact that each
of the three teams has lost and won a
game. It will be necessary for the
managers of the law teams to get in
touch with Intramural Director Rowe
at once in order for the playing off
of this triangular tie. Sophomore and
junior engineers will settle first and
second places in their game today.
Pharmics lead the combined colleges,
with the homeops second. Junior and
freshmen dents occupy first and second
places, respectively, in their college,
while the fresh medics hold first place
in that school. The team winning
second place in the medical school has
been disqualified.
The schedule for the second round
follows:
Saturday morning, May 15-Fresh
lits vs. first team in law division;
fresh medics vs. junior dents; soph
lits vs. second team in law division;

ond team in eng. division.
Monday May 24 - Fresh
fresh medics; junior dents
team in law division.
Tuesday, May 25--Soph lits
dents; homeops vs. second
law division.

homeops vs. second team in eng. di-
vision.
Monday, May 17-Fresh lits vs. win-
ner in eng. division; pharmics vs.
first team in law division; fresh dents
vs. second team in law division.
Tuesday, May 18-Soph lits vs. sec-
ond team in eng. division; homeops vs.
fresh dents.
Wednesday, May 19-Fresh lits vs.
pharmics; fresh medics vs. first team
in law division; junior dents vs. first
team in eng. division.
Thursday, May 20 - Pharmics vs
fresh medics; soph lits vs. homeops;
second team in law division vs. see-

lits vs.
vs. first
vs. fresh !
team in

Wednesday, May 26-Fresh medics'
vs. first team in eng. division; juniorl
dents vs. pharmics.
Thursday, May 27-Fresh dents vs.
second team in eng. division; first
team in law division vs. first team in
eng. division; junior dents vs. fresh
lits.
Will Speak In Interest of Bird Life
Mrs. Edith Munger, president of the
state Audubon society, will speak in
the interest of bird life at the bird
lover's meeting to be held at 7:00
o'clock tonight in the Museum lecture
room. Mrs: Munger has acquired a
reputation in this line of work, and
her coming is expected to draw a good
crowd.
Receives Invitation to Alumni Dinner
President Harry B. Hutchins has re-

taken sentiment held by many people
that the present administration is
"laying down on the job." But it must
seem when we study the situation from
the only means at hand that Mr. Wil-
son by virtue of his ability and posi-
tion is probably better fitted to handle
the present situation to the ultimate
good of the nation at large than any
other individual or group of individ-
uals could possibly be.
Therefore, let us send to him a cam-
pus-wide expression of our apprecia-
tion of the way he has handled the dif-
ficulties which have arisen thus far,
and of our complete confidence that in
any crises of the future we may de-
pend upon him absolutely.
L. F. MERRITT, '15E.
J. E. MILLIKEN, '16E.
PUT HYDRAULIC PUMP IN YARD
BECAUSE OF LACK OF SPACE
Because no place has been found in
jthe engineering building where it may
be set up, a hydraulic pump, recently
given to the engineering college by the
Detroit Edison company, has been put
out in the yard west of the building.
The machine is a three cylinder steam
pump, and weighs about 48,000 pounds.

-e_"HORSELESS AGE" FOR MAY 5
. TELLS OF AUTOMOILE TESTS
Michigan's courses in automobile en-
gineering have just received recog-
nition from a technical magazine, with
the publishing of an article in the

Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
It has occurred to many of us in the
past few weeks that due to the pos-
sibility of strained relations between
the United States and certain of the
countries at war, there has been a mis-

"Horseless Age" for May 5 concerning
experiments carried on in the automo-
bile department of the university. The
article deals with the tests which stu-
dents of automobile engineering made
recently, under the direction of Prof.
W. T. Fishleigh, of the engineering
college,'on back pressures, horsepow-
er losses and muffling ability in auto-
mobiles.

,

The article covered five pages of the
magazine, and was profusely illus-
trated with cuts showing various
curves which explain the results ob-
tained. "The Horseless Age" is one of
the foremost automobile magazines
published in the country, and is highly
technical in content.

ceived an invitation to attend the an- It was given to the university when the
nual Chicago alumni association din- Detroit company displaced it with
ner, to be held in Chicago May 22. larger machinery.

- ,I

ajestic

Buliard

Parlor

The Handy Place for Cigarettes, Tobacco and Cigars. Also a line of Candies.
Pass your idle time on State St. in playing a, good game at Pool or Billiards

AN

and

KOKALES

.

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