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May 14, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-14

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E YEAR
LOCAL

m I,

ie

Michigan

Daily

MAILED

NO0W
75c

7-a

161.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1915.

PRICE FIN

PRCEFl

ISLER AND REGAN,
PUT ON SLAB DUEL
>)rliell Man and _lclhigan Star to Be
Pitted Against Each Other
in Tomorrow's
Game
)ACH DETERMINED TO GET
MEN OUT OF BATTING SLUMP
emann or Anderson to Fill Left
Garden; Line-up to Remain
Same
George Sisler is the man who will
>rk against the Cornell nine when
e Wolverines and the Ithacans stack
against each other at 3:30 o'clock
morrow afternoon. The Red team
taking no chances, and Regan looks
:e the man to work for the visitors.
ith the best twirlers on each team
the box, a tooth and nail fight is
omised.
Sisler's appearnce in the box will
use a shift in the line-up. Labadie
obably remaining in right while ei.-
er Anderson or Niemann will take
e place left vacant by Sisler. The
bstitution of a man to take Sisler's
ace in the outfield will not, however,
use a change in the batting order,
ich will be the same as that used in
e M. A. C. game, with either Niemann
Anderson in the vacant outfield:

TODAY'
Comedy club 'meets in Cercle Fran-
cais rooms, 4:00 o'clock.
St. Johns club members meet at Un-
ion, 6:30 o'clock.
All-senior sing in conjunction with
Varsity band and glee club, campus
band stand, 7:00 o'clock.
Mrs. Edith Munger speaks at bird lov-,
er's meeting, Museum lecture room,
7:00 o'clock.
H. S. Sheppai d lectures on "Wireless
Telegraphy" in room 248 engineer-
ing building, 8:00 o'clock.
Combined junior lit and engineer
dance, Union, 9:00 o'clock.
.TOMORROW
Track meet-Michigan vs. Syracuse,
Ferry field, 2:00 o'clock.
Baseball-Michigan vs. Cornell, Ferry,
field, 3:30 o'clock.
Membership dance at Union, 9:00
o'clock.
Straw hat day.
340 MEN TAKEOUT
LIFE MEMBERSHIP

TENNIS TEAM WILL
START EAST TODAY
Play First Game with Oberlin College
Tomorrow; Two Games at
Pittsburg

TO SING 'AMERICA'
AT FIRST CONCERT!

Choral Union to Open May
with Audience Jolninmg
National Hymn

Festival
in

SEVEN BATTLES ON SCHEDULE] CHORUS APPEARS, THREE TIMES

Captain Ira Reindel and his three
supporters on the Varsity tennis team
leave today for the annual eastern
trip, playing Oberlin tomorrow in the
first intercollegiate competition of the
year. The team will then go to Pitts-
burg where it plays the University of;
Pittsburg and Carnegie Tech on Mon-
day and Tuesday of next week. Haver-
ford, Pennsylvania, Georgetown, and
Annapolis are the other teams which
will meet the tennis quartet.
Oberlin, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania and
the Navy bid fair to give Michigan the
most trouble on the courts. Oberlin's
team has been at work for some time
now, pointing itself for the Michigan
match, and the Ohio university should
put up a stiff front to the Wolverines.
Pittsburg has played five intercol-
legiate matches so far this season,
meeting Penn State, Georgetown, Penn-
sylvania, Annapolis, and Princeton.
Pennsylvania went under to a 4 to 2
defeat. Captain McKilroy and two of.
last year's veterans are back this year,
and the Pittsburg quartet promises to
be one of the strongest college teams
in the country.

In the first of its three appearances
on the 1915 May Festival program, the
Choral Union will open the initial con-
cert next Wednesday night, with the
audience joining in the singing of
"America."
On Thursday evening the Choral Un-
ion will take part in "The New Life."
The regular chorus will be supple-
mented at this time by a special chor-
us of 75 boys, from the choirs of the
Congregational and Episcopal church-
es. These boys have been trained by
Mr. Reuben Kempf, who is director of
both choirs, since the beginning of
school last fall. The boys' choir met
with the adult chorus in massed re-
hearsal for the first time last Sunday
afternoon. This choral work will take
up the first half of the Thursday night
program.
Miss Frieda Hempel, leading colora-
tura soprano of the Metropolitan Op-
era company will render a number of
operatic selections during the second
half of the Thursday night program.,
The Choral Union will not take part
in the Festival again until Saturday
night, when "The Children's Crusade"
will be given. In this work the regu-
lar Choral Union chorus of 300 will be
supplemented by a special chorus 'of
about 300 children. These children
have been trained for many months
by Miss Florence B. Potter, supervisor'
of music in the Ann Arbor public

* It's the time when every student *
* is licensed to turn out in a cool,*
* weedy one, a slippery one, or a *
* soft, yielding one. It doesn't *
* matter just so it's a Straw Hat. *
* But don't think of venturing out- *
* in ordinary head-gear, if .you *
* value your life more than you *
* do having your hair mussed *
* when your cap or slouch is shot *
* off. For safety's sake, WEAR A *
* STRAW HAT. *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
SCHEDULE THIRD CORNELL GAME
Red Team Fills Open Date on Wolver-
ine Nine's Schedule
With the scheduling of a game with
Cornell at Ithaca, on Thursday, May
20, the last open date of the eastern
trip is filled. Michigan already had a
game scheduled with the Red team for
Wednesday, May 19, in addition to the
one to be played in Ann Arbor next
Saturday.r
SELECT PINNEY AS
S1UC.A,.PRSDN

ELECTION DAY M
TAKE PLACE MAY
Directors of Athletic Associatik
Tentative Date for Campus
Balloting; Others
To Concur
NOMINEES FOR OFFICES W
BE PICKED AT NEXT MEF
Varsity Band Members to Get Sw
Carrying Old English
Insignia
As a result of action taken y
day afternoon by the board of dir
of the athletic association, the ge
campus election day will occui
year on Wednesday, May 26, this
the tentative date selected. 'Of
of the Michigan Union unoffi
sanctioned this day following the
ing of the athletic directorate, an
proposition will be placed befor
board in control of student pu
tions at its session on Saturday n
ing.
The board will hold a special
ing next week, at which time the
nations for the various athletic o
will be made. The names of pros
ive candidates are now in the b
of the faculty eligibility board, a
report from this board will deter
the nominations.
A petition from the Varsity
asking for permission to award
type of insignia to the members o
organization, was acted 'on favor
and the musicians will appear
time in the near future, decked in
sweaters on which will be embla:
the band insignia in old English
ters.
Final action on thearegula
governing the award of athletici
erals is set for the next meetii
the board.

'ed ballpractice was the key-
f yesterday's Varsity baseball
t. Coach Lundgren is deter-
to get his men back into their'
stride, as shown before the re-
Ann Arbor while on the south-
p' The batting drill occupied
: the afternoon, and was follow-
I workout on the diamond.
'S WILL HEAR FIRST ALL}
'IOR SING AT BAN) STAND

cians and Glee Club to;
ist in Program
Tonigta

With the Varsity band and Glee club
sharing in the program, the all-senior
sing, which will begin at 7:00 o'clock
tonight at the campus band stand, is
expected to attract an unusually large
crowd. The arrangements for the
affair are being made by the chairman
of the class senior sing committees, C.
T. Bushnell, '15, Wyeth Allen, '15E,
and H. L. Nutting, '15L.
The singing will be led by the Glee
club under the direction of Kenneth
N. Westerman, grad., and the band
will play an accompaniment to some
of the pieces. The opening number
will be "The Victors," in which all,
will take part, folowing which the Var-'
sity musicians will play "That Michi-
gan Band." The seniors will then
sing " 'Tis of Michigan," and "I Want
to Go Back to Michigan.'' The other
songs on the program, not including
the selections by the band, are "Fare-
well to You Old State Street," "He
Rambled," "I'll Ne'er Forget My Col-
lege Days," "Where, Oh Where Are
the Verdant Freshmen?," and the "Yel-
low and Blue" in closing.
Seniors from all. departments will
take part in the program, and in order
to accommodate the large numbers ex-
pected, the committee will have 200
benches and chairs placed about the
band stand.
IPARTY OF STUDENTS TO VISIT
DETROIT AUTOMOBILE PLANTS
Nearly 40 students of automobile en-
gineering in the engineering college,
accompanied by Prof. W. T. Fishleigh,
of the college, will go to Detroit at
7:00 o'clock Saturday morning to vis-
it two automobile plants in that city.'
In the morning the party will be shown
over the Ford plant by special ar-
rangement, and in the afternoon tech-
nical men at the Cadillac factory will
conduct students around that plant.
The latter trip will form a sort of lec-
ture tour son the manufacture and op-
eration of Cadillacs, and the features
of the eight cylinder automobile man-
ufactured by the company will be ex-
plained.
The trip will be open to a number of
students outside the courses in auto-
mobile engineering, and anyone who
desires to go with the engineers may
secure information on the tour from
Professor Fishleigh in the engineering

'Union Secures Large Number of Ap-
plicants in Night Canvass;
185 Work
DEAN PROVES BEST SOLICITOR
Without previous press-agenting of
any kind, 340 new life members of the
Michigan Union were gained in a can-
vass of the campus last night. The
impromptucampaign was largely as
a follow-up of Wednesday night's mass
meeting.
The canvassers numbered about
185 men. Only 145 had reported their
returns to the Union last night,
leaving 40 men still to be heard from.
The ' central campaign committee,
headed by E. H. Saier, '15L, was in
general charge. The night attack was
primarily aimed at the securing of as
many memberships on the campus as
possible before beginning work
among the alumni. A grand
total of $17,000 was added
to the $55,600 previously subscribed.
The canvassers were given the names
of their men yesterday afternoon, hav-
ing been summoned by means of pos-
tal cards.
In the 185, 30 were assigned to solic-
it 'the fraternity men. The leaders in
this division and the number of mem-
hers secured are: Russell E. Dean, 18;
Staats Abrams, 15; Donald Wurzburg,
14; R. E. Barnum, 14; Charles Barton,
12; and Phillip Middleditch, 11.
The workers among the indepen-
dents had only about half as many
names. The most successful solicitors
and their totals are: R. H. Criswell, 7;
N.arold Easly, 6; A. H. Toney, 6; A. V.
Dubee, 6; J. H. Otis, 5; and P. B. Ma-
her, 5.
PICK WHEELER AS PRESIDENT
OF COMBINED MUSICAL CLUBS
lHartesvelt, Ballentine, Wilson and
Forsythe Chosen for Other
t Positions
F. C. Wheeler, '15E, was chosen
president of Michigan's combined mu-
sical clubs at a meeting and banquet
held last night at the Union. Other
officers who were elected for the com-
ing year are: P. A. Hartesveldt, '16L,
vice-president; D. R. Ballentine, '16,
manager; U. S. Wilson, '16, leader of
the Glee club; and H. B. Forsythe;,
'17E, leader of the Mandolin club.
These officers with F. A. Taber, '17, of
the Glee club and O. O. Leininger, '16D,
of the Mandolin club will act as the
executive committee of the club.
P. A. Hartesveldt who was elected
vice-president of the club holds the
distinction of being the oldest man on
the club, having taken three western
trips. Next year will be his fifth year
of connection with the club.
Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, of the German
department, who acted in the capacity
of faculty representative on this year's
trips, spoke a few words to the mem-
pers at last night's banquet. All mem-
bers of the club who took the Christ-
mas trip this year were given watch
charms.

Pennsylvania has played two match-
es, having faced Yale and Princeton.
In the Yale match, Pennsylvania was
defeated by a 4 to 2 score. The work
of Captain Davis and Disston saved
two points for the Penn team, and
these two men bid fair to make things
hot for all teams that face the Penn
racket wielders.
The Navy always succeeds in turning
out a strong team, and this year's
quartet is not below the average. In
spite of the fact that Michigan won
over the Navy last year in a 6 to 0
match, the veterans with the Sailors
are in better shape this year, and the
showing of last year probably will not
be repeated.
PLAN ELABORATE CHAUTAUQUA
FOR SUMMER ENTERTAINMENT
Ann Arbor's summer Chautauqua
will be inaugurated this year with ev-
en more elaborate plans than that of
last season, according to B. H. Rawls,
ex-'17, secretary of the Civic associa-
tion. The Chautauqua will correlate
and supplement the university summer
session.
CRUMPACKER WILL
R-UN LOW HURDLES

IEIMANN TO MEET WITH NEW MEN
At the meeting of the S. A. C. cabi-
net held last night N. Earl Pinney, '16,
was elected president of the associa-
tion for the year 1915-1916. The posi-

schools.
To accommodate all these people on
the, Hill auditorium stage, it has been
found necessary to raise the back of
the stage 18 inches. Supplementary
seats are being placed for the children
at the sides of the stage. A hidden'
choi'us of children behind the rest of
the chorus will be used to give an echo
effect.
The first massed rehearsal of the
children's chorus with that of 'the reg-
ular chorus was held at the school
of music last Friday, under the direc-
tion of Prof. A. A. Stanley. On Sun-
day afternoon, they will rehearse with
the adult chorus in Hill auditorium.
Professor Stanley is optimistic over
the part of the Choral Union will play
in the festival. Since spring vacation
three rehearsals have been held every
week, and the attendance and work ac-
complished have been remarkably
good, he says.
CONTEST TRYOUTS
LACK ENTHUSIASM
But 20 Sophomores Report at Water.
man Gym; No Heavy Candi-
dates Appear

Coach Has Not Chosen Second Man
Go Over Jump's; Seeking 440
Man for Relay

to

Divisional
In

QIV~9IT AND T~1~FAY DiiQWTITTFC I C:A fVQ 'MA'V' TrI fl' PQTTf11 Qa1$TTT'.

Officers of Y.M.C.A. Chosen
Close Contests; 400
Votes Cast

omj I Ii - , I: R. a k2 kIJ AJ E~
By winning the low hurdle trials
yesterday afternoon, Crumpacker es-
tablished himself as one of the two
Michigan entrants against Syracuse in
this event.
The time was not particularly fast,
nor gratifying as all of the men have
run the distance considerably faster,
and Coach Farrell is still undecided
as to who the other Michigan low hur-
dler will be. "Bo" Wilson did not run,
but there is a possibility that he may
prove Crumpacker's running mate to-
morrow against Syracuse.
The coach is still casting about
rather vainly for a fourth quarter mil-
er to complete the one-mile relay
team. George Fox may be drafted in-
to service and there is a slight possi-
bility that Captain Smith may run a
lap. However, neither of these two
nthletes has ever had any particular
experience with the 440, and the track
boss in sheer desperation and as a
last resort, offers a substantial re-
ward for any eligible Michigan man
who will step forward and volunteer.
The only requisite is a written guar-
antee to do 52 seconds or better. But
anyone attempting to usurp the hon-
or of running on a Michigan relay
team and failing to live up to his guar-
antee will be prosecuted for perjury
and dealt with according to law.

VALIIM ALAkI NUBEU D U iEJ UJ.
Lack of enthusiasm and proper class
spirit, on the part of both first and
second year men, marked the first day
of tryouts for the annual spring games
of May 21 and 22. Unless more men
turn out today the contests which have
become a tradition at Michigan will
not prove the success which they have
been in former years.
Just 100 men, out of the necessary
360, weighed in at Waterman gymnas-
ium yesterday, as entrants in the tug-
of-war. Of this number only 20 were
second year men. The sophs did not
have a single candidate in the heavy
weight class.
The relay tryouts did not prove any
more alluring. Of the 48 men re-
quired for the obstacle races, only 12
ran the course as candidates. The
fresh had eight of this dozen tryouts.
More men must get out today in order
to insure fast teams. The officials in
charge announce a change of place for
the relay tryouts from the Fair grounds
to the east end of Ferry field, along
the State street side. Today will be
the last opportunity for weighing in
and for relay trials. Tryouts will be
held in both events from 2:30 to 5:00
o'clock at Waterman gym and Ferry
field.',

tion is purely an advisory one and
carries with it a seat on the board
of trustees of the S. C. A.
According to the results of the elec-
tions in the divisional units of the
Y. M. C. A., the following men have
been elected to office:
Literary college, president, W. S.
Westerman, '18; vice-president, W. C.
Edwards, '17; secretary, George B.
Daniels, '18.
Engineering college, president, W. 0.
Henderson, '16E; vice-president, J. F.
Meade, '17E; secretary, Sherwood Holt,
'16A.
Law School, president, R. Richard-
son, '16L; vice-president, G. C. Claas-
sen, '16L; secretary, W. A. Neither-
cut, '16L.
Dental college, president, William
Klinesteker, '16D; vice-president, Leon
Bryant, '16D; secretary, C. H. Matson,
'16D.
Medical School, president, H. M.
Lowe, '16M; vice-president, J. F. Run-
ner, '16M; secretary, R. J. Frackle-
ton, '18M.
The contests in almost every case'
were particularly close. This fact was
especially true in the lit college where
the largest vote was cast. The total
number of votes cast in the electiona
in all the schools and colleges was
slightly in excess of 400, this being
one of the largest ballotings in the
history of the local association.
The men elected will meet some
time this week with Lewis C. Reimann,
'17L, president of the main Y. M. C. A.
and an effort will be made to complete
a full cabinet organization in each,
school and college within the near
future.
MICHIGAMUA BRAVES TAKE IN
10 MEN IN SECOND ELECTION
Choose Six Engineers, Three Lits and
One Law to All-Campus
Society
Michigamna, senior all-campus hon-
orary society, held its second election
yesterday afternoon, and took 16 juni-
ors into the tribe of redskins. A ban-
quet was later held in honor of the
initiates in the society's rooms on
North University avenue.
The juniors who were elected into
membership are: James M. Barrett,
Jr., '16, Glenn M. Coulter, '16, Louis B.
Hyde, '16E, Francis T. Mack, '16E,
William C. Mullendore, '16L, Mac-
donald S. Reed, '16E, Sidney T. Steen,
'16E, Clarence E. Ufer, '16, Theron D.
Weaver, '16E, Howard H. Phillips, '16E.

1 2
Junior laws......1 3
Senior laws'......4 0

Junior engineers beat the seniors o
the same department to the tune o
fourteen to three, errors helping th
'16 boilermakers to heap up their ta
lies. The line-up and score follows:
Senior engineers-McCabe ef, Ric
c, Fowler ss, Sheppard 2b, Krase 1b
Ratz rf, Stvel lf, Bergstrom 3b, Me'
calf p.
Junior engineers-Pettibone lf,Rich
ards 3b, Bricker 1b, Vogel rf, Hallo
way cf, Gore p, Buell 2b, Hedden s
Tobey c.
1234567
Juniors ............0,1 0 5 0 0 8-1
Seniors..... ...0 1 0 0 1 1 0-
Today, the junior engineers an
soph engineers will meet to decide tl
engineering championship for firs
round.
HAL SMITH TO LEAD VARSITY
CHEERS DURING NEXT YEA
Captain Harold Smith, of the Va
sity track team, will be tl
official cheer leader for We
verine rooters next year, h
appointment to the position being, a
nounced yesterday afternoon follow
ing the meeting of the board of dire
tors of the athletic association.
Smith's selection came as a result
the recent action of the board, dete
mining that a Varsity athlete shou
hold the position for next year.

JUNIOR ENGIN
AND SENIOR

Junior engineers, homeops, a'
ior laws were the victors in
day's interclass diamond strugg
Ferry field.
The homeops chalked up five
against the architects' none,
first two innings. In the third
Miller, architect catcher, suff
broken nose from a foul tip. T
that team with tat eight men
field, necessitating a forfeiture
contest.
The senior barristers triumphe
the Juniors in an overtime g,
eight innings. The line-up and
follows:
Senior laws-Leiserwitz 21
ant lf, Peacock rf, Burton p, N
lan 3b, Donelly cf, Lewis c, Wil
Wright lb.
Junior laws-Martin 3b, Mc(
Brownell ss, Rowan p, Stev
Thomas c, Brown If, Scott rf,
of.

34567
1 2 0 0 (
0 1 1 1 (

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