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May 07, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIHE YEAR
LOCAL

lC

ichigan

Daily

I SUBSCRI
N 0 I
jMAILED 75c

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 7, 1915.

P

------ --------

EN INNINGS
IRELESS TIE

.yracuse, Through Slater's Sisler
Brand of Pitching and Good
Fielding, Prevents
Score
;0TH TEAMS HAD TWO LIKELY
.CHANCES TO PUT MEN ACROSS
allure to Work'Squeeze Play Success-
fully and Use of Hidden Ball
Trick Disastrous
Syracuse University forced Coach
undgren's boys to their second tie
ame of the year, playing the Varsity
1 innings to a scoreless finish in yes-
erday afternoon's game. Michigan's
Nance to come back will arrive to-
iorrow when the second game of the
aries takes place.
Michigan made but one error in yes-
erday's game, that one coming in the
rst inning when McQueen slipped up
n a chance from Rafter's bat, the Syr-
cuse lead-off man reaching first in
afety, but being caught off second
hen Wilbur hit into a double play.
lilbur's work for the Orangemen was
f first class variety, the third sacker
Laking some difficult put-outs on foul
ies, and making three hits out of five

ed like the real stuff in
Methodist who defeated
.riking out five Michigan
king two hits in his four
He was placed only in
situations, and pulled
these. In the meantime
Wolverines to four hits,
.ggers, by Benton and
gle by Benton, and a
ild hit by Waltz. These
e the only ones who could
ery of the Orangemen at

TODAY
Comedy club tryout, Cercle Francais
rooms, 3:00 o'clock.
Soph Prom at Armory, 8:30 o'clock.
Campus band concert, 7:00 o'clock.
Charity vaudeville at Whitney theater,
8:15 o'clock.
Tau Beta Pi annual faculty reception,
Granger's academy, 8:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Annual meeting of Craftsman society,
Masonic temple, 7:30 o'clock.
Membership dance at Union, 9:00
o'clock.
Baseball-Michigan vs. Syracuse, Fer-
ry field, 3:00 o'clock.
Announce Saturday Dance Committee
Committeemen for the membership
party billed for tomorrow night at the
Union clubhouse are R. J. Mills, '16L,
chairman, Harry E. Baker, '17E, W.
Casgrain, '18, and Walter Delano, '17.
Tickets are on sale.at the Union.
SOPHOMORE. PROIV
PREPARTIONS END
Affair Awaits First Strains of Dance
Music from Finzel's J-Hop
Orchestr"
COMMITTEE DISGUISES ARMORY
Tonight is the night when sopho-
mores and other campusites will dance
to the strains of Finzel's J-Hop or-
chestra at the Armory. Robert W.
Collins, '17E, general chairman of the
1917 Soph Prom, last night announced
everything iii readiness for the da ce
which will be one of the most elabo-
rae ever given by any class in the
university.
The grand march will start prompt-
ly at 9:00 o'clock, although extra danc-
es will be given from 8:30 to 9:00
o'clock, and will continue until 2:00
o'clock. No programs will be given
out until the grand march. The pro-
gram will consist mostly of one-steps,
there being two one-steps then a waltz.
Every sixth dance will be a fpx-trot.
The armory has been completely
disguised by the hands of the decorat-
ing committee. The walls have been
covered with black and white, and in
the center of the hall have been placed
smilax and roses interwoven in a sort
of lattice work. At one end of the hall
will be a large "Michigan" in colored
lights, "1917" in the class,colors being
at the other end. The committee in
charge has planned to have several
spotlight dances, and also several em-
ploying unique color effects, the class
colors being introduced in these.
The strictest informality will be ob-
served at the prom, no carriages or
flowers 'being permissible. White
trousers and blue coats will be in
vogue for this evening's function.
Dean John R, Effinger and Mrs. Ef-
finger, Prof. John R. Allen and Mrs.
Allen, Prof. J. A. C. Hildner and Mrs,.
Hildner, Prof. W. D. Henderson and
Mrs. Henderson, and Mr. and Mrs. W.
H. Butler will act as chaperons.
The various committees in charge of
the affair are as follows: R. W. Col-
lins, '17E, general chairman; commit-
tee on arrangements, Jack H. Connel-
ly, '17, and H. A. Taylor, '17E; com-
mittee. on decorations, Gordon Smith,
'17E, and H. S. Nichols, '17; committee
on refreshments, Russell Crawford,

'17, and E. R. Akers, '17E; program
committee, E. E. Mack, '17, and E. J.
Huntington, '17E; publicity committee,
C. T. Fishleigh, '17E, and W. K. Nie-
mann, '17.
Owing to the elaborateness of the
decorations, the decoration committee
is in need of more men.' They have
sent out an appeal, asking those who
can assist in the decorating, to report
at the Armory at once.

'Yi WLL NOT JOIN
ELECTIONDAY PLAN
Cabinet Says It Cannot Complete Its
Organization Before Date
Set, May 30
CHOOSE OFFICERS NEXT WEEK
At the meeting of the Y. M. C. A.
cabinet held last night, the withdraw-
4l of the organization from the Cam-
pus Election day plan for this year
was announced. The reason given by
the officers was that, on account of
the lateness of the balloting day,
which has been placed at May 30, it
would be impossible for the "Y" units,
the officers of which are still to be
elected, to complete their organization
and working cabinets in preparation
for the work next fall.
The election will be held next week
by means of a duplicate post card sys-
tem. Post cards with a return ballot
card attached will be sent out from
the association offices Monday after-
noon to all paid-up members of the
Y. M. C. A. All members are asked
to vote for their preferences and mail
the card back to the association not
later than 6:00 o'clock Wednesday
night, On Thursday morning a com-
mittee composed of W. J. Goodwin,
'16L, Julius Fischbach, '17, and C.
Stanley Wood, '16L, will count the bal-
lots and announce the result of the
elections.
Arrangements were made for the en-
rollment of a delegation of 50 Michi-
gan students to attend the annual stu-
dents' conference .at Lake Geneva,
Wis., June 18 to 28.
At a meeting of the retiring presi-
dents of the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. M.
C. A., the newly elected presidents of
the two organizations and the retiring
president of the S. C. A. tomorrow af-
ternoon, nominees for. the presidency
of the S. C. A. will be made. The elec-
tion will take place at a meeting of
the combined Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C.
A. cabinets next Thursday night at
8:00 o'clock in Newberry hall.
IRVING K. POND, '79E, WILL BE
SPEAKER AT UNION GATHERING
Architect to Explain Building Plans;
Varsity Band to Be Present;
Admission Free
Irving K. Pond, '79E, prominent ar-
chitect of Chicago and a member of
the firm of Pond & Pond of that
city, will be one of the principal
speakers at the mammoth Union mass
meeting, next Wednesday evening, in
Hill auditorium. He will explain the
building plans in detail, with the aid
of slides.
It is on Mr. Pond's old homestead
site that part of the new building will
rest. The Pond lot is just north of
the present Union, and the house
thereon is still occupied by Mrs. E. B.
Pond, mother of I. K. Pond, who will
speak here, and A. B. Pond, '80, the
men who drew up the plans for the
new structure.
The Varsity band will be on hand to
add zest to the occasion, as the result
of arrangements made with Manager
S. J. Hoexter. The great organ will
be put into service for the first time
since last fall at a student gathering,
if present plans materialize. It is
aimed to make the occasion an inspir-
ing one, in order to attract every man

in the university.
Admission will be free to all, wheth-
er Union members or not. The, ob-
ject will be to emphasize the Union
ideal and to put the undergraduate in
intimate touch with the million-dol-
lar campaign for a new club-house.
Recent Law Graduate Dies in Escanaba
M. D. Mead, '13L, died of typhoid
fever in Escanaba, Friday. Mr. Mead
was a member of the Alpha Delta Phi
fraternity while in the university.

25 MEN TO, MEET
NOTRE DAME TEAM
Large Squad Leawes for South Bend
at Noon; Expect Strong
Opposition
MAX ROBINSON MAY RUN DASH
One of the biggest squads, that has
ever represented Michigan in a track
meet, will leave for Notre Dame this
noon. No less than 25 men will make
the trip, accompanied by Coach Far-
rell.
Max Robinson's excellent showing
over the 220-yard route Wednesday af-
ternoon, means that the sophomore
may run this distance against the
Catholic institution, leaving Fontana
and Huntington to care for the quar-
ter. Captain Smith and O'Brien will
be on hand as usual for the sprints,
so that Hardy of Notre Dame will have
a big task on his hands to make any
impression upon the scoring sheet in
the dashes.
Ufer and Fox will start in the 880,
although there is a chance that Fox
may be shifted to the mile. "Eddie"
Carroll will surely run this distance,
which makes the Wolverines look good
for a few points in the mile.
"Red" Donnelly and Kuivinen will
start the two-mile. Corbin, Catlett and
Crumpacker will run the low hurdles,
while the first two mentioned will
compete over the high sticks. "Les"
Waterbury, Berry and Perschbacker
will tend to the high jumping, with
"Johnny" Ferris, Leslie and Thurston
entered in the broad jump.
"Bo" Wilson and Cross will do the
pole vaulting and Michigan should
pull down the big honors here, as both
Wilson and Cross have been going
good lately. C. Cross and Phelps havec
been selected to represent Michigan
in the shot put and discus, while De
Gowin and Bastian will throw the
hammer.]
Coach Farrell stated that althoughi
he had no definite line on Notre Dame,i
he believed they would be much
stronger outdoors than they were wheni
they fell before the Maize and Blue1
in Waterman gym. Every man try-
ing for a position on the Varsity squad,
who stood a chance of placing, willE
make the trip.
The team will leave. Ann Arbor at1
1:17 o'clock over the Michigan Cen-i
tral, and will return tomorrow night.
BISHOP C. D. WILLIAMS WILL°
SPEAK AT EPISCOPAL BANQUET
Bishop Charles D. Williams of the
Episcopal diocese of Detroit has.been
secured as the out-of-town honor guest
to speak at the annual Episcppal stu-
dents' banquet to be held tonight at
6:30 o'clock in Harris hall. President
Harry B. Hutchins and Prof. Arthur
L. Cross have also been invited as
guests of honor.
A short informal reception will pre-
eede the banquet, and -after the din-
ers have finished, an informal dancing
party will be held under the auspices
of the Hobart Guild.
SENIOR LITS TO HOLD FINAL
CLASS DANCE NEXT WEDNESDAY
As the final party of the year, the
senir lits will hold a "Swing-out
Dance" at the Country club next Wed-
nesday, the day after the regular
swing-out. The dance will be the first
evening affair staged by the class, and
a large attendance is expected. Be-
cause, of the limited size of the dance

hall, the number of tickets will be
limited to 50.
Woolsack Elects Nine First Year Laws
Woolsack, honorary junior law so-
ciety, has elected the following mem-
bers of the first year law class: T. E.
Atkinson, R. L. Carpenter, L. F. Dahl-
ing, H. G. Gault, H. R. Hewitt, E. B.
Houseman, M. C. Mason, Oliver Phil-
lips, and W. H. Sanford..

MAY DISPOSE OF EDITION OF
YEAR BOOK WITH DAY'S SALES

Bel

Remaining 250 Michiganensians to
Offered to Public at Campus
Tents

RANI
TOS5

ES-

In all probability today will be the
last on which copies of the 1915 year
book may be obtained. Yesterday's
sale of Michiganensians brought the
total to more than 850 copies, leaving
but 250.of the edition to be disposed of.
The sale of the annual this year far
exceeds that of former years. It has
always been customary to offer copies
for sale at the book stores after the
campus campaign is finished. This
year, however, present indications
point to the fact that the supply of
books will be exhausted at the close
of today's sales.
A large number of the annuals this
year have been purchased by under-
classmen, particularly freshmen, ow-
ing to the books' greater appeal to the
campus.in general. Seniors, who have
not obtained copies of the book are
urged to get them today at the tents
on the campus, as it is not likely that
a second edition of the annual will be
issued unless there is a demand for
several hundred extra copies.
MUSICAL CLUBS TO
CARRY 51 ON TRIP
Large Number to Give Performance in
Grand Rapids and Jackson
Today and Tomorrow
TO ELECT OFFICERS ON MAY 13

Pr

A

ORATOR
PARTS

HAS TAN
IN CAMP

rev

Frances L. Hickok,

speak for Michig
Oratorical Leagu
in Iowa tonight, 1l

gan in

.nn

day morning accompa:
T. C. Trueblood, of the o
ment. Professor True
pleased with Miss Hicko
expressed himself as hig
as to the outcome of the
Mlss Hickok prepared
the high school of Plainv
She spent two years atI
where she was elected I
utor's club, an honor so
ary composition, and b
Sigma, an honor sociel
scholarship. While at A
also active in dramatics
Miss Hickok prepared
the high school at Plain'
present senior class. Sh
steadily in the oratorical
pretative side of public
has taken leading parts

I

wo pieces of bad base-running stop-
d the Wolverines from possible
>res, Waltz being caught on the hid-
n ball trick in the second inning,
d Benton failing to score on an at-
mpted squeeze play in the eighth.
.e Syracuse pitcher was waiting for
iltz's bunt when Benton was racing
and the Wolverine runner did not
ve a chance at the plate.
Ahearn, the Orange short-stop was
gely responsible for keeping the
tting average of the Wolverines be-
w normal. He made two remarka-
e plays on hard hit balls by Maltby,
her one of which should have gone
r singles. In addition to his field-
g, he put Michigan in one hard po-
ion when he hit safely in the sixth
th one man on. Only the timely
ike-out registered to Ferguson's
edit put Michigan in the safety zone
another inning.
Syracuse started what looked like
other possible score for their team
en Wilbur beat out his third infield
of the day in the first of the elev-
th. He was advanced to second
Zen Seymour went out by the Fergu-
n-Maltby route. Brandell caught
Learn's high fly, and prevented Wil-
r from going to third. With two
wn Hamilton hit over Waltz's head
iat seemed to be a safe hit. Wilbur
s half way home, and if the liner
d gone as a hit Syracuse would have
gistered the score which had been
reatening. Sisler made a long run
d a beautiful catch of the liner,
ding the inning.
Niemann took Ferguson's place in
e batting order and beat out a bunt
ien Morgan made a bad throw. Shee-
's bunt on the first ball pitched went
to the air and Hamilton, the first
seman, made a shoe string catch of
e little pop up, and tossed the bal'
first for an easy out on Niemann.
badie fhied to deep center and Um-
re Davis called the game on ac-

When the 9:17 train pulls out of the
Michigan Central depot this morning,
49 members of the Glee and Mandolin
club, D. R. Ballentine,'16, manager .and
Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, faculty repre-
sentative, will leave for Grand Rapids
to 'give a concert in that city. They
perform this afternoon for the high
school students of the Furniture city
and in the evening will give a perform-
ance for the general public. A dance
in honor of the Michigan men has been
planned after the concert.
Tomorrow morning the troupe leaves
for Jackson where they will give a
concert in the Athanaeum theater.
This is the second trip of the year for
the musical club, the entertainers go-"
ing east during the Christmas holidays.
The club will hold a dinner at 6:00
o'clock Thursday, May 13, at the Union
when officers for next year will be
elected.
The list of the Glee club men who
will make the Grand Rapids-Jackson
trip is: K. N. Westerman, '14, P. A.
Hartesveldt, '16L, C. L. Straith, '15M,
W. S. James, '15D, R. A. Parker, '16,
H. B. Wright, '17D, H. G. Sparks, '17E,
H. N. Schmitt, '16, J. B. Angell II, '16,
C. C. Bailey, '17, M. L. Drake, '15D,
R. F. Khuen,-"'15, H. W. Kerr, '16, L. R.
Scanlon, '16L, W. B. Kleinstecker, '16D,
F. P. Surgenor, '16, R. M. Parsons, '14,
W. S. Westerman, '17, U. S. Wilson, '16,
H. M. Easley, '16, V. L. Miller, '15L,
J. Zeigler, '17,.-H. F. Whittaker, '15E,
R. C. Perkins, '15A, C. T. Bushnell, '15,
S. T. Alden, '17E, H. E. Carlson, '17E,
S. J. Hiett, '16L, C. P. Ritchie, '16, H. L.
Nutting, '15L, H. Snyder, '17, and F. A.
Taber, '17, accompanist.
The personnel of the Mandolin club
is as follows: R. H. Mills, '15E, D. C.
Wurzburg, '15, F. A. Bade, '15, M. F.
Bennett, '16E, J. C. Abbott, '15E, C. H.
Breyman, '17, P. O. Mulkey, 16E, J. R..
St. Clair, '17, O. O. Leininger, '16D,
A. V. McIver, '15E, E. C. Roth, '15, C. C.
Coult, '17E, W. 0. Johnson, '15E, A. L.
Honey, '17D, C. C. Ashbaugh, '16, H. B,
Forsythe, '17E, and F. C. Wheeler, '15E.
Has to Postpone Journalistic Lecture
Mr. Lyman Bryson, of'the rhetoric
department, announces that the jour-
nalistic lecture, which was to be given
by S. D. R. Smith, of the United Press,
this afternoon, is postponed indefinite-
ly on account of the sickness of the
lecturer.

FRANCES L. HICKOK,'1
who will represent Michigan. h
Northern Oratorical League c
held at Iowa City tonight.
presented by the Oratorical As
tion. She is a member of the Co
club and took part in "Pom
Walk."
On March 4 of this year Miss
ok won the University Oratorica
test, the Chicago Alumni meda
Kauffman testimonial of $100 an
right to represent Michigan i
present twenty-fifth annual cont
the Northern Oratorical League
is the first woman in the hietc
the university to represent her
Mater in either debating or orato
Prof. T. C. Trueblood states ,tl
contest is one of the biggest
kind held in the west. Seven co
Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa, Wise
Oberlin, Illinois and Northweste
regular participants in the eveni
judges in the battle this year are
A'. D. Weeks, of Fargo,-N. D., Hon
ert G. Cousins, of Tipton, Iowa,
cellor Clark A. Fulmer, of the U
sity of Nebraska, Pres. W. 0. C
of Waukesha, Wisconsin, and
W. G. Manley, of Columbia, Wise
Indiana Professor Will Speak T
Prof. Frank T. Stockton, of I
University, will speak at 2:00
next Tuesday, in room 101 e4
ics building, on the subject,
Cooperative Experiments in an
ican Trade Union."

and summaries fol-

on -Dage 6)

vxt lrzu

5 Vl

.. _

i

Advertisers' Number of

IART

HE

GARGOYLE

A'

Tonight, fIlitAUDITORIUM

Ti

Hampton's Famous Quart
SINGING PLANiAJ10N MELODiES

ON SALE ON THE CAMPUS AT NOON

T0 DAY

RUMOR

TICKETS 25c.

8

.
...r... M. .. ..

I La

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