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May 04, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-04

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B LANCE7501 THE YEAR
DL) 75c LOCAL

The

Michigan

Daily

XXV, No. 152.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 4, 1915,

FRESH LOSE4TO2
GAME TO VA1RSITY
Iughitt Does Receiving for Yearlings
in Seven Inning Conflict
With Weakened
Regulars
JIRANDELL RETURNS TO WORK
FOLILA WING ENFORCED ABSENCE
Anderson, General Utility Man, Suffers
Fracture of Finger in
Early Practice
Most of Michigan's regulars took a
rest yesterday in preparation for their
coming conflicts with the team from
Syracuse university, but enough men
appeared at Ferry field to form a team
which beat the All-Fresh in a seven
inning game by the score of 4 to 2.
"Tommy" Hughitt did the coaching
for the freshmen from behind the bat
in the early part of the game, the ex-
third baseman of the Varsity, acting
as receiver for the yearlings until
Lambert went in. "Tommy" could not
stay. out of the game, but took his
place in left field. With their coach
in the game, the freshmen made a good
showing against the team which repre-
sented the regulars, keeping the top1l
number of runs down to four in spite
of six errors.,
The Varsity line-up contained only
two of tle regulars, Benton taking
possession of the berth usu y held
by Sheehy in center feld, while Bran-
dell made his reti1rn to the 'diamond
and active work with the nine, The
short-s'top's hands and wrist have been
In bad shape, spoiling his performance
In almost every department of the
game, and preventing him from taking
part against Case Saturday. He sur-
vived yesterday's workout unscathed,
and unless his jinx catches him again
he will be in good shape for the Syra-
cus games at the end of the week.
In the early part of yesterday's prac-
tice Anderson, who has been serving
as general utility man for the Wolver-
ines, Was receiving fly balls and caught
one on the end of his finger, the blow
resulting in th'e fracture of that digit.
The finger should be in such condition
by Thursday that Anderson will be
able to take part in the game if nec-
essary
The team which represented the Var-
sity in yesterday's conflict with the
All-Fresh was made up of Davidson
at right field, while Benton held down
center field, later changing to second
(Continued on page 4)
ANNUALVAUDEILLE
STAGEDTHIS WEEK
Ianlcng, Sliging and Instrumental
Numbhers on Charity
]Programi
"EXHIBITION CABARET," FEATURE
Presenting much of the best student
talent on the campus in a diversified
program, the second annual charity
vaudeville will be presented at the
Whitney ' seater, May 6 and 7, by the
Ann Arbor Federation of Charities.
The, program contains acts of ap-
proved vaudeville nature, from dancing
numbers to choruses. Helen Ely, '16,
who starred in the production of this
year's junior girls' play, will present
the "Premiere Danseuse," assisted by

Genevieve O'Leary, '16, Adele Crandafi,
'17, Elizabeth Mason, '15, Margaret
Durfett, Helen George,.'17, and Marie
Boos, '15. Miss Ely will also take part
in a fancy modern dancing number
with Glenn Shipley, '16.
Chase B. Sikes, '16, former Glee
club soloist, wil present a number, as-
sisted by a chorus of 10 Japanese
maidens, wh'ile Frank W. Grover, '18,
who played the part of Annette in the,
(Continued on page 4)

*- m-

TODAY
Junior Research club meets in Min-
eralogical laboratory, 8:00 o'clock.
Miss Laura G. Smith speaks in Harris
hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Dr. Mabel Ulrich speaks to univer-
sity women in Newberry hall,' 4:30
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Michiganensian out, 12:00 o'clock.
Annual cup debate, room B, law build-
ing, 8:00 o'clock.
Craftsmen society dances at Armory,
9:00 o'clock.
Tau Beta Pi Dinner, Michigan Union,
6:00 o'clock.
BICKNELL YOUNG TO ADDRESS
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
Bicknell Young, C.S.B., member of
the board of lectureship of the Mother
Church, the First Church of Christ
Scientist, of Boston, Mass., will lecture
before the Christian Science society
of the fJniversity of Michigan on Tues-
day evening, May 11, in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall at 8:00 o'clock. The lec-
ture will be free to the public.
Comedy Club Will Eleet New Preslilent ,
at Next Meeting; Hold
Tryouts Friday
CHOOSE MODERN PLAY FOR 1915
Francis F, McKinney, '16L, who was
elected president of the Conedy club
at a meeting held last Tuesday has
resigned the position, and a new man
will be elected to fill his place at the
next meeting of the club which will
probably be held next Tuesday.
The first real tryout for membership
in the club will be held at 3:00 o'clock
Friday in the Cercle Francais rooms.-
At the meeting held for instruction of
candidates last Thursday, more than
65 students were given parts to learn
for the trials which come on Friday.
Anyone, however, who failed to appear
at the last meetirg ngay compete in
the tryouts Friday by choosing a selec-
tion from some reading which will not
take more than three mninutes to recite.
The part selected may be comedy,
heavy or a character role, and Should
be chosen in keeping with the indvid-
ua l's ability. It is possible that those
who tryout for the first time o Fridy
may be asked to give something ex-
temporaneous. Previous experience in
the dramatic line is not necessary for
the competition. With the probability
of giving several sml plays during
the year, it is expected that a large
number will come out, as those who do
not make the big play of the year will
be given a chance to display their
ability in one of the smaller ones
An effort is being made on the prt
of the committee in charge of chos-
ing the play for next year to select a
modern drama or comedy as it is
thought that much more interest wuld
be manifested by the students in a
modern play, The play for next year
will be chosen before the closing of
college this year, and will be presented
next fall instead of the spring as in
previous years, Parts will be assigned
for next year's play to be learned dur-
ing the summer vacation.

CONDITION OF J. CHENOT, '16,
IMPROVES, IS DETROIT REPORT
James Chenot, '16, of Detroit, who
has been in a serious condition since
an operation was performed upon his
heart at Grace hospital in Detroit ten
days ago, is improving, according to a
report received from Detroit yesterday.

MEN FOR SATURDAY
Unfavorable Weather Slightly Checks
Activities of Track
Squad

ENGLISHMAN WlLL
SPEAK ON BALKANS

Hon.,

G. 3. Trevelyan, Authority
European Conditions, to
Lecture

oil

TO USE THREE QUARTER-MILERS INFLUENTIAL IN RELIEF WORK

Active preparations for the Notre
Dame track meet began yesterday
afternoon. The struggle with the
Catholic institution comes next Sat-
urday, and will be staged in South
Bend.
Disgruntled at the weather, but
pleased with the result of the Var-
sity meet last Saturday, Coach Far-
rell checked the activities of his men
somewhat yesterday afternoon, be-
cause of the cold. The coach stated
that the squad which went to Notre
Dame would probably be a big one, as
he intended to take everyone that in
his opinion, stool a chance of plac-
ing.
One of the most pleasing perfor-
mances Saturday afternoon was the
work of the three Varsity quarter-
milers. Although "Al" Robinson of
the freshman class won the affair
with. his sensational 49 3-5, Fontana
ran close to 50 fiat, and Max Robinson
and Huntington did' near this figure.
Both Captain Smith and O'Brien are
out after revenge because of the trim-
ming handed them by Hardy in the
Notre Dame indoor meet here. The
captain evened the score with the
Notre Dame man in the Penn relays,
but O'Brien who did~ not make the
trip, was" denied the privilege. The
official time as announced in the 100-
yardbdash last Saturday was 10 fiat,
but both watches caught "Obie" in a
slight fraction under this figure, which
means that Mr. Hardy will have to
step considerably faster than is his
custom, if he is figuring on nosing out
either of the Wolverine sprinters.
Although Wilson sustained a bad
fall in the low hurdles, he will be in
shape for the meet next Saturday.
Corbin, the hurdler who has been out
of the running temporarily with a bad
leg, should also be in shape.
The coach stated that he would pick
his team Thursday afternoon. No
trials will be held, although Farrell
said that he might send a few of his
athletes over certaip distances, to as-
sist him in determining in which event
they should start.
R. A. ALGER GIVES AEROPLANE
Aero Club to Overhaul Gift in Time
for Boat C1 Regatta
Russell A. Alger, president of the
Michigan Aerp 'elib, an Frederick
Alger, have just presented a model
"B" Wright aeroplane to the univer-
sity Aero society. The machine will
arrive in Ann Arbor within a few
days, and will be completely over-
hauled by members of the society. The
motor will be tested in the mechanical
laboratory-of the engineering college,
and Will be used for demonstration
purposes in the goirse in aeronautics
offered in the colleg. The machine
is fitted with fipats, and may be used
as a hydroplane.
The society expects to finish over-
hauling the aeroplane in time for the
Boat club regatta this spring, and
will fly it 'er the 4kg bove Barton
dam at the water events. F. L. Loudy,
'15.E, president of the Aero society,
will pilot the machine when the flights
take place,
Director Rowe Returns From Chicago
Floyd A. Rowe, director of Intra-
mural activities, has just returned from
Chicago where he attended the third
annual meeting of the Middle west
Society of Physical Education and
Hygiene. There were about 400 mem-
bers in session at this convention.
Director Rowe spoke on the "Practi-
cal Method of Developing Intramural
Activities."

Direct from the European battle
line in Servia, Hon. George Macauley
Trevelyan, one of England's foremost
historians, will deliver his lecture on,
"The Situation in the Balkans" at
Sarah Caswell Angell hall at 8:00
o'clock Thursday evening.
Perhaps no other man has been so
continually referred to as an author-
ity on the conditions in Europe, as has
Mr. Trevelyan.
For years he has made an extensive
study of the political and historical
problems of the Mediterranean coun-
tries, especially those of the Balkans.
After the present struggle had been
started he was influential in organiz-
ing the British-Servia relief work
commission, and the people of Servia
owe him much for their -present wel-
fare.
Mr. Trevelyan's lecture Thursday
night will probably include h short
survey of the government of the Bal-
kans. as well as a discussion on the
present conditions of the much dis-
cussed territory. Although Mr. Tre-
velyan is but 40 years of age, he is
the author of numerous historical
books of note, which are referred to
by men prominent in governmental
affairs. The historian is the son of
Sir George Otto Trevelyan, who was
a nephew of Macauley.
"MICHIGAN MEN COMPLICATING
FORCE AT YPSILANTI SCHOOL"
Dr. Mabel Urilch Says Girl's Training
Fails to Teach Them Personal
Reserve
"Men in the University of Michigan
are one of the most complicating of
all the factors entering into the social
situation at the Ypsilanti Normal col-
lege," said Dr. Mabel Ulrich, of Min-
neapolis, in speaking to more than
1,200 students Sunday night 'at the
Majestic theater, "The girls in prac-
tically all of the normal schools of the
state come for the most part, from
small towns, and they have not learned
o exercise that personal reserve which
is necessary to keep the average col-
lege boy at the proper distance."
In discussing her subject which was
"The Unnecessary Evil," Dr. Ulrich,
who is the only woman member of the
Minneapolis vice commission, gave
some of the theh - e social evil
and its solution which the commission
arrived at during its investigation of
existing social conditions in Minne-
apolis,
Brief reports of the work which the
university Y. M, C. A, has done during
the past year were given by Waldo R.
Hunt, '16, retiring secretary of the
organization, and P. V. Ramsdell, '16,
general chairman of the Busrah cam-
paign gave a brief summary of the
project and the amount of money
which has been subscribed to date for
this year's budget, $2,800 being the
approximate figures which he gave as
the total of this year's canvass.
APPOINT COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN
FOR SOPH ENGINEER POW-WOW
Committee chairmen for the second
annual pow-wow of the 1917 engineer-
ing class have been appointed as the
first step toward preparing for the
outing. Harry Carlson, '17E, has been
appointed general chairman of the
pow-wow and the following sub-chair-
men have been selected: R. G. White,
fire committee; Spencer Alden, enter-
tainment committee; H. E. Ramsey,
refreshment committee, and A. T.
Streeper, smokes committee. No date
has been set for the pow-wow but it
probably will be held about tbe last
of this month.N

MUSICAL CLUB GIVES CONCERTS
IN GRAND RAPIDS AND JACKSON
More Than 50 Men to Leave Ann Arbor
Friday Morning on
Spring Trip
Michigan's Glee and Mandolin club
will journey to Grand Rapids and Jack-
son Friday and Saturday of this week,
where it will give concerts. The club
will go to the Furniture city Friday
morning, where it will give a com-
cert to the high school students of that
city in the afternoon, and in the eve-
ning another concert will be given,
which will be followed by a dance
given in honor of the visiting Michigan
students. On Saturday noon, May 8,
the musicians will go to Jackson,
where they will give a concert in the
Athenaeum theater. More than 50 men
will make the trip and Prof. J. A. C.
Hildner of the German department will
be .the faculty representative.
This is the second trip of the year
for the club, Toledo, Cincinnati,
Youngstown, Ohio and Rochester, N. Y
being the cities in which the club
performed during the Christmas holi-
days.
On Monday, -May 13, the combined
Glee and Mandolin club will hold a
banquet at 6:00 o'clock at the Union,
and at this time officers for next year
will be elected. Short talks will pro-
bably be given by the old and ne
officers of the club.
SOPHOMORE RROM
WILLBEELABORT E
Though Informal, May Rival Annual
Party of Juniors in Social
. Calendar
FANCY DECORATIONS PLANNED
When the strains of Finzel's J-Hop
orchestra fill the Armory Friday night,
it will mean the beginning of one of
the most elaborate Soph Proms eve
given. Dancing will start at 8:30
o'clock and will continue until 2:00
o'clock. Carefully devised schemes fo
decorating the hall have been intro-
duced and the Armory will hardly be
recognizable after the sliilful hands
of the decorating committee have been
at work. Robert W. Collins, '17E,
,general chairman of the function has
announced that all was in readines:
for a dance that will equal the J-Hop.
Because of faculty ruling, the strict-
est informality will be observed. If it
were not for this decision, however.,
the second year men might rival th
Juniors for the honor of being hosts
at the largest social event of the
scholastic year.
Black and white will be used for
masking the Armory,,instead of the
red and black, which are the class
colors. These, however, will not be
neglected as it is the plan of the com-
mittee in charge to have a number of
unusual feature dances, in which the
class colors will be conspicuous. Tick-
ets for the affair have nearly all beer
sold. The few remaining ones are on
sale at the Union.
Dean John R. Eflinger and Mrs.
Effinger, Prof, John R. Allen and Mrs.
Allen, Prof. J. A. C. Hildner and Mrs.
Hildner, Prof. W. D. Henderson and
Mrs. Henderson, and Mr. and Mrs. W.
H. Butler will act as chaperones.
EULALIE STONE, '18, TAKEN HOME

Girl Who Attempted Suicide Leaves
College with Parent
Eulalie Stone, '18, who attempted
suicide Friday by taking.cydnide, was
discharged from the homeopathic hos-
pital Sunday, and has been taken to
her home in Charleston, West Va., by
her father. According to hospital
authorithos she had fully recovered
froux the effects of the poison, before
she was discharged.

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On Sale Wednesday Noor, May 5 at
T'E LAW WALE -" - - - THE FLAG POL
PRICE $2.50

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