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May 02, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-02

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AAr, am.W~
XNCE, OF THE YEAR
The LOCAl

e

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE
Now
MAILED 75c

o-

Vol. XXV, No. l4.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 2, 1915.

PRICE Fl

..
-,--

HIT CASE TWIRLERHSR
FOR /7-RUlN TOTAL
Varsity Men Find Science Slab Artists
for 16 Bingles, While McNainara
lolds Ohioans to Lone
Safe One
A IR-TIdT PWI TCIN4 CUTS OFF
VISITORS' INITIAL INNING LEAD

TODAY

SECOND YEAR MEN
WIN ARSITY MEET
Yearlings and Juniors Lead Senior
Track Athletes itsFinal
Reckoning
TIMES PLEASE COACH FARRELL
Michigan's sophomores romped
away with first honors in the Varsity

N.E.PINNEY VICTOR
AT HIPONCONTEST
Wins Right to Represent [iehigan in
Peace Finals to Be Held at
Lake Mohonk
FORM ER WOLVERINES WINNERS
For the third time within the lastl

SUPERINTENDENTS CLOSE WITH
.ELECTION OF YEAR'S OFFICERS

Choose Madison, Wis., As Location
Next Annual Convenition of
Association

forl

Rev. Dr. Sunderland speaks on, "Th
Glory of Pioneership," Unitarian
church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. A. W. Stalker speaks on, "The
Power of God," First M. E. church
10:30 o'clock.
Rev. Leonard A.-Barrett speaks at the
Presbyterian church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas speaks at Con-

e
, '

With the reelection of last year's
officers for the ensuing term, the Am-
erican Association of Superintendents
of Buildings and Grounds closed its
second annual convention here yester-
day. J. M. Fisk, of the University of

BIG MEETING OPE,
CAMPAIG OF UN
flonst4-r Educational Gathering i
Atiditorimin, May 12, Will
Explain New Building
Funds Crusade
SELDEN .S. DICKINSON, 118-'1
TO PRESIDE OVER GA-THE
Koontz, Bisbee, Saier, Baxter, HN
Hays and Gault Will Soliei
A llong Al11uni

four years, the University of Michigan Iowa, was again chosen president of

McQueen, Sisler,, Maltby, Waltz,
Cet homers, Netting Seven
Runs for Locals

Each I

meet yesterday afternoon, amassing I will send a representative to the Na-

Michigan's Varsity steadily pounded
two pitchers from the Case School of
Applied Science for over two hours
yesterday afternoon, and the Wolver-
ines had no difficulty in getting the
long end of a 17-1 count. Coach Lund-
gren's boys found Andrews and Smith,
the Ohio twirers, for 16 hits in eight
innings, and gathered four circuit
clouts during the milling. McNamara
twirled a classy brand of ball for the
home aggregation, whiffing 14 of the
30 scientists who faced him and allow-
ing but a lone safe bingle.
McNamara did not get started in the,
first, allowing the visitors a base on'
balls and a hit which scored the man
on the bases. After the first inning
the Case team never had a look-in,'
being retired in one-two-three order
14 every round except the third when
McNamara did all the work for Cap-
tain McQueen's men, hitting one man
and proceeding to strike out the other
three.
Michigan's richest innings were the
second and the seventh, a total of 11
i'uns being counted in these two
rounds, six in the second and five in
the seventh inning. Maltby opened the
second with the score a tie at 1-1.
He singled through second, Shivel and
Waltz filled the bases by drawing
passes, Sheehy hit for the second time
of the game, scoring Maltby, while
Shivel died trying to reach the plate.
McNamara scored on the play at first
which left Labadie safe. With Sheehy
and Labadie on third and second Cap-
tain MeQueen got his first hit on the
home grounds, easily reaching home
on a fly over the center fielder's head.
lenton hit safely, but died on the bases
when Maltby was out at first.
The fourth inning netted two count-
ers, Sisler slamming out a four base
hit along third base foul line, and scor-
ing Labadie. Two home runs in the
fifth was the only scoring done, Malt-
by and Waltz each finding Andrews
for circuit bingles. Sisler walked in
the sixth, stole second, and scored on
Maltby's hit between the Case second
baseman and short stop.
Michigan fell short of her record of
the second inning by but very little
in the seventh, scoring- only one less
run. No home run was scored al-
though Benton managed to get around
the complete circuit of the sacks on a
hard hit ball between the center aud
left, When the ball reached the Cleve-
land catcher, three men had scored, and
Benton was seated on the bench. The
Michigan catcher was called out how-
ever because he failed to touch second
base in his wanderings on the paths.
One of' the other runs was scored by
McNamara who was forced home when
Smith hit Sisler with a pitched ball
' with the bases full. Shivel scored the
fifth counter after he had hit safely
and had advanced to third by hits by
McNamara and Labadie. He came in
on an error by Smith.
Michigan followed the precedent of
. Case in her last time at bat, going out
in one-two-three order. By the time
the game was closed with the striking
out of Catlin the bleachers were an
empty looking series of seats, most of
the 3,000 spectators who saw the first
few innings of the game having dis-
appeared during the course of the
man-slaughter.
The box score and summaries

gregational church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. Frank B. Bachelor speaks on,
"Jesus' Teachings Concerning Fel-
lowship," First Baptist church,
10:30 o'clock.
Rev. Mr. Boynton speaks at Church of
4Christ, 10:30 o'clock.
Dr. Mabel Ullrichs speaks on,"The Un-
necessary Evil," Majestic theater,
6:30 o'clock.
Rabbi Max Merritt of Evansville, Ind.,
speaks on "The Four Wells," Mc-
Mlv'an hall, 6:45 o'clock.
R . Dr. Sunderland gives an illus-
trated lecture on "Shakespeare and
His Times," Unitarian church, 7:30
o'clock.
TOMORROW
K. A. Plumb, of Detroit, speaks on,
"The Waterproofing of Concrete
Structures," in amphitheater of
chemical building, 9:00 o'clock.
Hillsdale club organizes, Newberry<
hall, 5:30 o'clock.
ALL-FRESH PLAYERS
'SWAMP NORMAL 8w2
1918 Nine Better Ypsilanti Aggrega-
lion in Every Department of
Struggle
ELECT BAR1EAU FRESH CAPTAIN
Michigan's, All-Fresh baseball team
again took the measure of the Michi-
gan State Normal College nine in their
second encounter at Ypsilanti yester-
day afternoon. The yearlings proved
superior in every department of the
game, winning by an 8-2 score.
In the first inning it looked as
though a fair battle was due, but be-
fore long the freshmen opened up and}
in the second round put over four
runs which in themselves were enough
to cinch the game. The freshmen also
outhit their opponents, getting nine
clouts to seven for the Normalites.
While waiting for the game to be-
gin the freshman squad elected .Bar-
ibeau captain of this year's team.
Baribeau has shown up well in prac-
tice, as well as playing a stellar game
in the two encounters which have been
staged this season. He is an exception-
al utility man being able to play near-
ly every position on the team and also
being one of the surest hitters that
"Tommy" Hughitt has found.
Field played a good game at first
where he 'handled his sack in fine
form. Bialoskey showed up well, on
the keystone sack getting four put-
outs without having an error chalked
up against him. Lambert, who was
expected to show up and who had the
opposing pitcher rattled at the be-
ginning of the game performed very
poorly, striking out four times out of,
five, the other chance being wasted in
a measly infield hit.
The box score and summaries fol-
low:
(Continued on page 6)
Interclass Baseball Will Make Debut
Interclass baseball will make its
debut on south Ferry field tomorrow
afternoon when the senior literary,
engineering and law teams clash with
the nines representing the freshman
classes of these same departments.

a grand total of 56 points. The fresh-
men finished second with 32 points,
while the juniors were third with 26.
The high and mdghty seniors trailed
shamelessly and hopelessly behind
with the more m odest sum of 12.
Coach Farrell was particularly
pleased with the meet, as the times
recorded in some of the events were
especially comneudable, notwith-
standing the fact that this was the
first outdoor meet of the season.
The summaries follow:
100-yard dash--preliminaries: 1st
heat-O'Brien (S) and Robinson (F),
tied for first, Scofi46ld (F) third. Time
-10 2-5 sec.
2nd heat-Smith (J), first, Baer (F)
second, Ziegler (F), third. Time-
10 2-5 sec.
Finals--O'Brien (S) first, Smith (J)
second, Robinson (F) third. Time-,
10 sec.
220-yard dash-Smith (J) first,
O'Brien (S) second, Scofield (F) third.
Time-22 sec.
Shot put-Cross (S) first, Walls (F)
second, Leud (F) third. Distance-
42 ft. 3 in.
Discus throw-Smith (F) first,
Cross (S) second, Phelps (Sr.) third.
Distance-115 ft. 3 in.
Mile run-Carroll (S) first, Bouma
(F) second, Fishleigh (S) third. Time
-4 min. 36 2-5 sec.
2-mile run-Donnelly (S) first, Kui-
vinen (S) second, Wolfe (F) third,
Time--10 min.32 sec.
120-yard high hnrdles-Wilson (S)t
first, Wickersham (F) second, Corbin
(S) third. Time--16 4-5 sec.
220-yard low hurdles-Crumpacker
(J) first, Wilson (S) second, Darnall
(F) third. Time---27 sec.
High jump--Sanons (F), Luther(F)
and PerschbackEfr (S) tied for first at
5 ft. 6 in.
Pole vault-Cross (Sr.) first, Wilson
(S) second, Lutier (F) and Clark (F)7
tied for third. Reight-11 ft. 6 in.
Hammer throw-Bastian (J) first,1
'Campbell (S) second, DeGowin (Sr.)
third. Distan'ce-123 ft.
880-yard rain-Ufer (J) first, Fox
(J) second, Shadford (F) third. Timet
-2 min. 1 2-5 sec.I
Broad jump-Ferris (Sr.) first, Les-J
lie (S) second, Thurston ,(S) third.
Distance-21 ft. 5 3-4 in.
440-yard run-Robinson (Sr.) first,1
Fontana (S) second, Robinson (S)3
third. Time-49 3-5 sec.1
Total;-Sophomores, 56; freshmen
32; juniors 26; seniors 12.
RED, LLOYD DOUGLAS ARRIVES i
A' CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, formerly re-;
ligious director of the University of
Illinois and recently chosen pastor of1
the local Congregational church, will
begin^ his pastorate this morning. Mr.
and Mrs. Douglas, with their family
arrived in Ann Arbor Friday and have
made their headquarters at the home
of Mrs. Hinsdale, 1414 Washtenaw'
avenue.

tional Peace contest, this year to be
held May 20 at Lake Mohonk, New
York. N. E. Pinney, '16, won first
place for the state of Michigan in the
battle waged Friday night at Ripon
College, Wisconsin, and thereby claims
the right to speak for the Central
group of states in the finals. Indiana
was given second place, Wisconsin
third, Illinois -fourth and Ohio fifth.
Pinney's subject was on, "The Am-
erican Conquest of. the World," and it
is this speech which will vie with five
others for the national laurels. The
United States has been divided into six
sections, North Atlantic, South Atlan-
tic, Western, Mountain, Pacific and
Central, each of which, by means of
state peace and interstate peace con-
tests, chooses an orator for the Lake
Mohonk event, making six contestants
in the final fray.
Last year Walter E. Morris, '14, cap-
tured the State Peace honors but lost
the Interstate contest. In 1912 and
1913, P. V. Blanshard, ex-14,'and Paul
Blanshard, '14, respectively, won both,
the State and Interstate battles and
capped the climax by carrying off the
national forensic honors. The oratory
department is confident that Pinney
will repeat these performances and
add a third victory to the university's
record.
The Michigan State Peace contest
took .place March 19 in Trnversity
Hall, where Pinney defeated orators
from Hope, Albion, M. A. C., Michigan -
Srate Normal, Hillsdale and Olivet. At"
Ripon he was pitted against represen-
tatives from the five different states1
composing the Central group, 'thus
making him victor over 11 opponents
in all. Each of these two contests r
awarded Pinney $75 as winner of first
place.
LIBRARY GETS ITALIAN LEGACY
1,500 Books Added to University Stacks
Due to Jerome Bequest
Librarian Theodore Koch announced1
yesterday that 1,500 books had beent
received from the estate of the latet
Mr. Thomas D. Jerome, '84, American
Consul at Capri, Italy. The volumes1
are now being checked up and made'
ready for use in the library. They con-
tain photographs of ancient Roman
ruins and a history of the country,<
both from a historical and political
view-point.1
Prof. F. W. Kelsey recently returned1
from Italy where he acted as the offic-
ial representative of the University ofc
Michigan, in looking after the bequest
that Mr. Jerome had made the univer-t
sity.
Besides the bequest of Mr.- Jerome,t
there were numerous other minor be-l
quests which were given examination.
Such collections as these are valuable1
and in the past it seems that many be-
quests have not been granted the uni-
versity because of the poor facilities.
The new addition to the library will
do away with this obstacle.

the association, R. A. McCracken, of
Ohio State University, was reelected
vice-president ad Arthur Dusty, of
Purdue University, was chosen for the
combined offices of secretary and treas-
urer. Madison, Wis., was selected as
the location for the next convention of
the superintendents, which is to be
held next spring.
During most of the time that the
association was not in session, the
members visited various parts of the
campus and secured much information
on how the university takes care of the
various problems in connection with
the maintenance of its buildings and
grounds. The business management
of the -buildings andngroundsdepart-
ment was also a source of interest to
the visitingsuperintendents, and a
number of ideas~ were exchanged in
going over the various departments of
the work.
All of the meetings of the associa-
tion were held in the office of Super-
intendent J. H. Marks, '08E, of the
department of buildings and grounds.
ICTIM OF CYANIDE
Eulalle Stone, '18, Taken to Homeo-,
pathie Hospital, Recover fromn .
Poisoning at Quarry's
CLERK FIGURES AS LIFE SAVER
Resting comfortably in a bed at the9
homeopathic hospital, Eulalie Stone,
'18, who sought death by taking cya-
nide of potassium yesterday, is rapidly
recovering her normal strength.
Her condition showed marked im-
provement yesterday, according to Dr.1
Elsie S. Pratt, university women's phy-
sician, who has charge of the case.
-Miss Stone's father arrived from his
home in Charleston, W. Va., yesterday
to see his daughter, and it is believed
that as soon as she has sufficiently+
recovered, he will take her home with
him. Several days' treatment, physi-
cians believe, will restore her strength
so that she can leave the hospital.
Prompt action on the part of the
clerk who sold Miss Stone the cyanide,1
undoubtedly figured largely in saving1
her life. According to information
gathered yesterday, the clerk observ-
ing her swallowing the poison imme-
diately dragged her, against her wi-l;
out into the street, and put her in the
first automobile which passed. Had
he tried to treat her in the store, or
called a doctor by telephone, com-
plications would undoubtedly have set
in before the much needed aid could
have been secured.
DUNLAP, EX-STUDENT, ON SHIP
-IN BRITISH MEDICAL SERVICE
President Harry B. Hutchins has
received word from Dr. C. W. Dunlap,

Under the auspices of the Michigan
Union, a monster educational mass
meeting will be held in Hill auditori-
um on Wednesday night, May 12, in
order to explain to all male under-
graduates and local alumni the plans
of organizing the campaign for funds
for the new Union building.
This meeting has been arranged ac
a result of the many inq uiries which
have been received from the student
body as to how the campaign is to be
carried on, what sum. -will be spnt
on the building and its equipment,
when and how the money will be.rais-
ed and similar questions. The cam-
paign committee hopes in this way to
educate the student body so that the
men will be fully informed as to the
project and the manner of conducting
the fall campaign. In this way the
number of workers will be multiplied
many times, for the information that
the undergraduate cAn give the alum-
ni about the Union idea and the cam-
paign will be of material assistance
to the university and to the campaign
committee.
At this meeting, in charge of Gen-
eral Chairman Selden S. Dickinson,
'13-'15L, the entire workings of the
organization that is to carry on the
campaign, will be explained. A large
number of lantern slides are, being
prepared, which will show for' the
first time such views of the proposed
building as the lobby, lounge, read-
ing and game rooms, terrace dining
room, billiard room, guest bed-chain-
ber, main cafe,, floor plans, perspective
and many others. Several speakers
will present the various phaes of the..
campaign, such as the organization of
the committees which will raise the
funds from the alumni throughout the
country, the plans of the building in
detail and the Union idea in general.
The following have been named as-
sistants to the general chairman:
Program, P.D. Koontz, '14-'-17L;speak-
ers, L. S. Bisbee, '15L; entertainment,
E. H. Saier, '13-15L; audience, Ken-
neth S. Baxter, '15E; publicity, R. W.
Haislip, '14L. These men, together
with J. G. Hays, '11, and Harry G.
Gault, 15, will be in the field during
the summer for the purpose of organ-
izing the alumni into solicitation com-
mittees.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB MEIBERS
HOLD FINAL PROGRAM OF YEAR
Members of the Cosmopolitan club
held their final entertainment -of the
year last evening in Newberry hall.
The program consisted of stunts, mus-
ical numbers, recitations and athletic
exhibitions which -interestingly por-
trayed the different foreign nations in
song and athletic events. Hawaiian
and Armenian music featured the mus-
ical part of the program, while Indian
club swinging, Japanese sword-play
and a fencing bout comprised., the
gymnastic.
CONDITION LITTLE CHANGED OF
CHENOT, '16, ILL IN DETROIT
No change was report'd this m6rn-
ing- in the condition of James Chenot,
'16. Authorities at Grace hospital,
Detroit, where the patient is confined,
said that there were no new develop-
ments yesterday, and that the patient's
physicians had made no statement re-
garding the case.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN, C5HURC
HURON AND DIVISION STS.
YOU ARE WELCORME
AT ALL OF THE CHURCH StRVICES
10:30 Communion Service
12:00 University Bible Class for Men and Women
6:30 Christian Endeavor Society

ex-'17D, who isy
medical service,
been ordered to

in the English army
that his division has
India.

When the war broke out, Dr. Dun-
lap left the university where he was
studying dentistry, and joined the
English medical service. He has been
doing service on a hospital ship, as he
already had a degree in medicine be-
fore coming to Michigan. His last
letter was written from the steamship
Arabia, and he had not been inform-
ed of his destinantion.

(Continued on page 6)

..

Majestic
'theatre

Dr.

ABEL

ULRICH

Auspices

Univ.

MEMIBER MINNEAPOLIS VICE COMMISSION

Tonight
6:30 P. M.

"THE

SPEAKS TO MEN ON
UNNECESSARY

EVIL"

Y. M. CoA.

1

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