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May 01, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-01

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ie

Michigan

Daily

1IIAILED

N 0 w

CAL
momm

mom

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 1, 1915.

PRICE

r

3FOR
I CASE'

mI

ORSĀ° BATTERY 'MAY GIVE
IVERINES SOME DIFFICULTY
nira to Be on Mound for Varsity
with Benton Catching
Left-hander
igan's line-up will undergo its
hange of the year when the
rines open against Case at 3:00
today. Brandell, whose hands
ist have been giving him troub-
1 be out of the game, and his
at short stop will be filled by,
Benton will be back in his,
it catch, and McNamara will do
ivering for Michigan.
umors have reached Ann Arbor
any exceptional strength of the
-hich represents the Case School
lied Science, and with the ree-
seven former victories and one
ae, Coach Lundgren's men are
)king for a particularly hard
t with the Clevelanders. Case-

TODAY
Golf club meets at Union, 1:15 o'clock.
Varsity track meet, Ferry field, 2:00
o'clock.
Baseball-Michigan vs. Case, Ferry
field, 3:00 o'clock.
Union membership dance. at Union,
9:00 o'clock.
Campus concert, band stand, 6:45
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Dr. Mabel Ullrich speaks on 'The Un-
necessary Evil," Majestic theater,
6:30 o'clock.
Rabbi Max Merritt of Evansville, Ind.,
speaks on "The Four Wells," Mc-
Millan hall, 6:45 o'clock.
Rev. Dr. Sunderland gives an illus-
trated lecture on "Shakespeare and
Ijis Times," Unitarian church, 7:30
o'clock.

VARSITY ATHLETES
OPEN1915 SEASON
Recent Cold Weather Retards Practice
of Track Men and Slow
Time May Result
Today
MEET SCHEDULED TO START AT
2:00 O'CLOCK ON FERRY FIELD
First Outdoor Contest Not Expected to
Break Records; Farrell
Acts as Starter

NAME CANIDlATES
FOR UNION OFFICES
Balloting for Nominees Will Be Held
on Campus Election Day; All
Members Eligible
to Vote
PiCK )1ULLENDORE, BAXTER
AND GAULT FOR PRESIENCY

CASE-MICHIGAN GAXIES OF
FORMER YE ARSt~
Year Nichigan Case
1908 2 0
1910 2 0
19105 3
1911 10 2
1911 5 5
1912 6 0
1913 12 1
1914 10 0

* * * * * * * *

*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*'
*k

LITERARY STUD
ATTEMPTS SUI
Woman Literary Student
Dose of Poison Secur
in Quarry's State
Street Store
PROMPT MEDICAL AID SA
EULALIE STONE FROM
Would-Be Suicide's Mental 4
Blamed by Doctors fo
Effort to Die
Culminating a year of nervo

Details Still Incomplete; Place
Holding Polls to Be An-
tounced Later

TOTALS ....52:
-0-

11

for

Games played.............8
Michigan.................7
Case....................0
Tie ....................1
* .* * * * * * * * * *

s,

Michigan's outdoor track season will
be ushered in officially this afternoon
with the Varsity meet, which is sched-
uled to start on Ferry field at 2:00
o'clock.
The majority of the athletes en-
joyed a lay-off yesterday afternoon,
the few that did turn up engaging in
but little work due to the cold weather
and the proximity of the meet. If
weather conditions are no better this
afternoon, times will be necessarily
slow.
Even under perfect conditions, the
marks hung up last season probably
will not be equalled, as this is the
first meet of the season, while last
year the Varsity struggle was the final
track encounter of the year on Ferry
field.
Coach Farrell, of the Varsity squad,
will act as starter.

FA MOUS HISTORIAN
WILL GIVELECTUREl
Address Deals with Present Balkan
Situation and Relations
with Powers

y, however, and
ines harder than
ime look for.
ace empty, the
ndergo a slight
g the Case pitch-
der: Sheehy, cf;
, 2b; Sisler, lf;
.b; Waltz, 3b;
a, p. The Case
lows: Beckman,
>; Clamens, c;
Hathaway, ss;
Cf; Andrews or

COACH YOST LEAVES PRACTICE
To SPEAK ON THURSDAY NIGHT IN HANDS OF CAPTAIN COCHRANj

of

h a business session
e American Associa-
endents of Buildings
bring its second an-
o a close. The meet-
ation have been held'
Superintendent J. H.
nine superintendents
rn colleges and uni-
m in attendance.,
ass'ociation for the
be elected this morn-
tibn of the next an-
of the body will be
session, two papers
rbers of the associa-
of the University of
of the body, gave' a
"Design and Ar-
ating Tunnels;" and
of the University of
per on, "Janitors and
A committee was ap-
data on the stand-
uipment of college
is probable that by
of the association,
re complete informa-
of the buildings and
st of the larger uni-
est.
LL TEAM FACES
I COLLEGE TODAY

Hon. George Macauley Trevelyan,
one of England's greatest historians,
has made arrangements with univer-
sity officials to give a lecture on "The
Situation in the Balkans" in Saral
Caswell Angell hall next Thursday ev-
ening. Mr. Trevelyan has made a.
reputation in the historical field and
is continually referred to as an au-
thority on European history, its de-
velopment and progress up to the
present time.
Several important historical books
have been written by Mr. Trevelyan.
His study has been confined particu-
larly to the diplomatic and political
relations of the European countries,
and his lecture Thursday night will
undoubtedly include some interesting
information as to the government of
the Balkans.
Another incident that will give his
lecture a spirit of modernness is that
he has just returned from Servia,
where he spent several months at the
front. His experiences along the Eu-
ropean battle- line together with his
superior acquaintance with conditions
as they are and have been, well quali-
fy him to speak on the subject he has
chosen.
Mr. Trevelyan s the son of Sir
George Otto Trevelyan, who was a
nephew of Macaulay. For many years
he has studied the diplomatic andpo-
litical problems of Europe, notably.
those of the Balkans. At the outbreak
of the war, much credit was given Mr.
Trevelyan for his assistance in or-
ganizing the British-Servian relief'
work.
SECURE DR. H. WARD AS GUILD'
SPE AKER FOR SUNDAY, MAY 9-
Dr. Harry F. Ward, of Boston and
Chicago, has been secured as the Wes-
leyan Guild speaker for Sunday, May
9. He will speak on the subject "The
Revolutionary Nature of Christianity."
During half of the year, Dr. Ward is
located at Boston where he is profes-
sor of sociology at Harvard. The oth-
er half of the year he spends in Chica-
go, where he is engaged primarily as
a social worker. It is expected that
Dr. Ward will arrive on Friday, May
7, to conduct a short conference.
Engineers Exhibit Locomotive Prints
Prints and pictures of old-fashioned,
locomotives, presented to the engineer-
ing college from time to time by Her-
bert L. Fisher, of Taunton, Mass., have
been gathered together into an exhib-
it, and have been hung in the south
stairway of the engineering building.
The pictures show railway engines in
use on American railroads between
1845 and 1855, when the average loco-
motive weighed about 25 tons. The
prints now make the college's collec-
tion of pictures of engines of this pe-
riod one of the most complete in the

Punters Continue Work Until Time of
Final Exams; General Drill
Ends Next Week
Called home suddenly yesterday
morning by business engagements at
his home in Nashville, Tennessee,
Coach Fielding H. Yost was not pres-
ent in the afternoon at the gridiron
practice which was staged with 20
men on hand. The coach had expected
to close his drills yesterday afternoon,
but the business call made . this im-
possible.
Football drills will not be stopped
because of Yost's departure, however,
but Captain Cochran and several of
the Varsity men will have charge of
the gridiron recruits who have been
working out during the past two
weeks. This practice will continue at
least one week,- after which a squad
of punters will take two or three
drills each week until the coming of
the June examination period.
Before his departure, Yost express-
ed himself as highly satisfied with the
results of the two weeks of practice
which he had directed. The drills,
which have been attended by over a
score of men each day, have given the
gridiron mentor an opportunity to look
over his candidates.
According to Coach Yost, the fall
practice season will commence two
weeks before school opens, with ap-
proximately 40 men in the squad.
Hildner, Raymond, Harry Schultz,
Sharpe and one or two others have
been named by the coach as the men
to continue their punting practice right
up to the time of examinations. Their
work will be under the direction of
of some of the Varsity squad men who
have worked for Yost in the kicking
department of the game.
Class Track Athletes Practice Monday
Candidates who wish to enier in the
class track meet to be staged soon will
have an opportunity to practice under
the supervision of Director Rowe next
Monday afternoon at Ferry- field. Mr.
Rowe will give pointers to all- wish-
ing to try for positions in this meet.
A pentathlon event is being arranged
for which a valuable prize will be of-
fered providing enough men show in-
terest along this line.
Engineers Inspect Detroit Factories
About 25 senior civil engineers, ac-
companied by Prof. L. M. Gram, of the
civil engineering department, will go
on a tour of inspection to Detroit this
morning. The party will visit the
plants of the Russell Wheel and Foun-
dry Co., and the Dodge Motor Car Co.,
and will return to Ann Arbor this af-
ternoon.
Report Plenty of Odd Jobs at Y.M.C.A.
Y. M. C. A. employment bureau offi-
cials announced last night that an un-
usually large supply of odd jobs were
still to be distributed and that appli-
cants were not coming in fast enough.'

After a consultation of two weeks,
the nominating committee for the offi-
cers of next year's Michigan Union
last night announced the men who are
to run for the various positions. Fol-
lowing is the list of candidates:
President: Kenneth S. Baxter, '15;
Harry G. Gault, '15-'17L; and William
C. Mullendore, '16L.1
Recording secretary: Louis M. Bruch,
'16L; John W. Finkensteadt, '16L; and
Earl B. McKinley, '16.
Vice-president for the literary col-
legg: James B. Angell, 2nd, '16; Rus-
sell S. Collins, '16; and David R. Bal-
lentine, '16. . i
Vice-president for the engineering
college: Francis T. Mack, '16E; How-
ard H. Phillips, '16E; Donald A. Smith,
'16E.
Vice-president for the Law School:
Adna R. Johnson, '16L; Eugene R.
McCall, '16L; and Werner W. Schroed-
er, '16L.
Vice-president for the Medical
School: Joseph R. Darnell, '18M; Wil-
liam J. Egan, '16M; and Carl W. Eber-
bach, '16M.
Vice-president for the combined col-
leges: H. C. Allen, '16H; Edwin W.
Crysler, '16P; and Frank J. Kane, '16D.
The election for these candidates
will be held on the Campus Electioni
Day, Saturday, May 29. It is planned
to keep the polls open from 8:00 to
4:30 o'clock. All members of the
Union are eligible to ballot for pres-+
ident and recording secretary, whilel
they cast their votes only for the vice-3
president of the college or school ini
which they are enrolled. Owing to theI
fact that .the details of the .Campus
Election Day have not yet been work-1
ed out by the student council, under
whose direction the election will be
held, the place for holding the polls:
has not yet been picked.1
VARSITY BAND GIVES OPENING
CONCERT ON CAMPUS XTONIGRT+
Opera Music to Feature First Outdoor
Program of 1915 Season;
Quartet to Singl
Michigan's Varsity band will give1
the opening campus concert at the3
band stand near the new science
building at 6:45 o'clock tonight. The
concert will last about an hour.
The bandmen have held two rehears-3
als in preparation for the concert sea-i
son, and will play the melodies from
the past Michigan Union operas to-
night, while a few popular song hits
will be rendered for the encores.
In addition to the band music, Ken-1
neth Westerman, grad., C. T. Bushnell,+
'15, W. S. Westerman, '18, and U. S.+
Wilson, '16, who composed the Varsity'
quartet, will sing the "Toast to Mich-
igan," and "When Night Falls Dear"
from Michigenda, the last song to the
accompaniment of the band.
The. Varsity musicians will appear
at the ball game this afternoon, as-
sembling in front of University hall
at 1:30 o'clock.
Return Architectural Drawings Sooni
With the close of the exhibit last!
Wednesday, the set of drawings, which
the architectural college sent to the
annual Chicag& Architectural exhibi-
tion, are expected to return to Ann
Arbor within a few days. The dem-
onstration began April 8, and was held
in the Chicago Art museum. The same
collection of drawings, which was!
shown by the college at the annual
convention of the American Institute
of Architects at Washington last De-
cember, was sent to the exhibit. t
Detroiter Talks To Chemical Students

K. A. Plumb, manager of the Trus-
Con laboratories in Detroit, will give
a lecture at 9:00 o'clock Monday morn-
ing in the amphitheater of the chem-
ical building. The talk will be on,
"The Waterproofing of Concrete Strue-
tures."

Sophomore Elopes With Alma Student
Miss Helen Doane, a sophomore in
Alma college, and Reginald McClinton,
'17, eloped last Friday from Alma,
where both reside, and were married
in Toledo, 0. Following the marriage,
they left for Denver, Colo., where they
will spend a part of their honeymoon.
MINSTRELS PLESE
U11iENCEOF 3000
Otto Wismer, Harold Schradzki; George
McMahon and Abraham Hart
Score Big Hits
QUARTET RECEIVES APPLAUSE
Unearthing numerous original stunts
and jokes mixed with commendable'
singing and whistling, the Boat club
minstrel show held in Hill
auditorium last night proved 'ac
decided success. More than 3,000 peo-
ple attended the.show, and at all times
the minstrels held the audience in ap-
preciative mood.
Otto Wismer, '15L, proved to be a
sensational minstrel, and led the group
of "colored comedians" by means oft
his unending capers, poses, and argu-1
ments. Beside him, and almost as
lauhable, were George McClure, '15;
Harold Schradzki, '15L;Leroy Scanlon,l
'16L; Thomas Doyle, '15L; and Harry
Mead, '15L. The whole group of col-
ored faces was an entertainment in'
itself, and when they appeared on the
stage a chuckle started and seemed to
keep going through the whole per-
formance.t
H. L. Nutting, '15L, seated in thet
center of the group, managed to keept
his minstrels together and filled his
place in a suitable manner.
One of the best numbers on the pro-1
gram was "Fifty-fifty," presented by
Schradzki,'in which he tried to show
that it was either "Fifty-fifty" all the1
time or nothing. Its originality and.
catchiness made it especially interest-
ing. Wismer in his "Chummy Chum
Chum" and Richie in his "Don't You
Cry My Honey," both succeeded in get-
ting a good applause.
George McMahon, '16, again cap-
ured the audience when he sang "Ten-1
nessee, I Hear You Calling Me," while
Abraham Hart, '17, took the audience!
by more than a surprise when he intro-
duced his whistling number, "Loves
Old Sweet Song."
U. S. Wilson, '16, drew a big ap-
plause when he sang his soo,"Some-
where a Voice Is Calling." Harry E.
Carlson, '17E, one of the cast in "All
That Glitters," also received a big ap-
plause when he sang "All the World
Loves a Lover."
Just before the closing selection, the
Wolverine quartette rendered four or
five song-hits, scoring as heavily as
any of the other numbers on the pro-
gram. The program closed with "Good
Bye, Boys."
D. R. OGILBIE, '16L, RE-ELECTED
PRESIDENT OF HOBART GUILD{
At a meeting of the Hobart Guild of
the Episcopal church held Thursday
night, D. R. Ogilbie, '16L, was elected
president of the organization for a
second term. The other officers elect-
ed were vice-president, Madge Mead,
'16; recording secretary, Howard Wil-
lard-Jones, '18E; corresponding sec-
retary, Lavinia MacBride, '17; treas-
urer, Wilfred Emmons, spec.
The annual banquet for all Episco-

pal students and faculty in the univer-
sity will be held at 6:00 o'clock next
Friday evening in Harris hall, and a
number of prominent speakers have
been secured for the program.

and despondency, Eulalie Stone,
attempted to take her life by sa
lowing potassium cyanide in Quar
State street drug store, & few mini
before 8:00 o'clock yesterday morn
A drug clerk at once hailed a pas
delivery car, and she was taken to
homeopathic hospital. Prompt r
ical attention was given, and ph
cians soon pronounced her out of d
ger.
It was just as the State street s
walks were crowded with students
ing to their 8:00 o'clock classes,- t
Miss Stone walked into the drug st
and asked for some cyanide crysi
for use in the biological laborat
In spite of the strict ruling of
Quarry that no cyanide be sold
cept for medicinal purposes, the el
on duty complied with her request.
Swallows Poison,
Upon being handed the crystals,
walked to the front of the store, br<
open the package, and swallowed p
of the contents. Another clerk,
serving her actions, questioned h
She admitted taking the poison a
asked how long it would be before
would take effect. His answer v
to run out in the street and sto;
passing delivery car in which the 1
tim was taken to the hospital.
At the homeopathic hospital apom
phine and stimulants were administ
ed. These, with the aid of a stoma
pump, proved effective in countera
ing the cyanide.
Mental Condition Blamed
Physicians and others connec
with the case declared yesterday,
ter investigations, that they are c
fident that there was no definite r
tive. They believe that the attemp
suicide was .brought about by a n
vous mental despondency, from wh
Miss Stone had been suffering for so
time. Since her entrance in coll
last fall, Miss Stone has been un
the constant care of Dr. Elsie S. Pr.
university women's physician, in
effort to improve her mental streng
"Directly against Orders,"-Quar
"I have repeatedly given my cle
instructions not to sell cyanide to
one except the proper medical
thorities," said Mr. Quarry, when
terviewed. "Not two weeks ago
refused to sell the poison to an
gineering student, who wanted it
use in the shops. Though I d(
doubt for a minute but that that
the purpose for which he wanted i
refused to sell it to him. I cannot
derstand how my clerk came to I
the poison, unless he was moved
Miss Stone's argument. Cyanide is
frequent demand by biological
dents for use in the laboratry, he
her request was not out of the 0]
nary."
Hospital authorities reported h
night that Miss Stone was improv
rapidly and -that she would proba
be out of the hospital within a few d
Her expected rapid recovery is d
to the fact that the poison was in
crystal form, and that she swalloy
only a small portion.
President Hutchins said yester
afternoon, that the girl's father is
his way to Ann Arbor from his h
in Charleston, W. Va.
CRENOT SLIGHTLY WORSE SA
NURSES AT DETROIT HOSPI
But slight change was reported
night in the condition of James Che
'16, of Detroit, who hasbeen in a

rious condition in Grace hospital
that city for 10 days following an
successful heart operation. Nurse;
attendance upon Chenot said at 1

unouncesI

Hughitt today an-
men who will ac-
psilanti today for
e Michigan State
e list being much
Bich was given out
lineup will be as
3b; Bialosky, 2b;
ambert, c; Andrus,
ton, cf; Field, 1b;
will start the game
.re to report also:
Drummond, Miller,,
Golden.
>e staged at 2:30
m is scheduled to
o'clock car on the

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