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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 30, 1915 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEICMICHIGAN, 4 AIL!

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M EN who select their attire with punctilious care, with
an eye for exclusiveness and individuality as well
as quality, are invited to inspect our showing of all that
is new in Stein-Bloch Smart Clothes, Hats and Haber-
dashery for warm weather-a comprehensive assortment
to meet every need-for town or city wear, for sport,
vacation, travel or every day. The little subtleties of style
presented in our apparel will be valued by those wo avoid
the commonplace.
CAMPUS COATS, all colors - $8.50
STRAW HATS, - - - $1.00 to $4.00
PANAMAS, -- - - $5.00 to $10.00
LIGHT SERGE TROUSERS, -- - $4.00 to $6.00
Shirts, Neckwear, Hosiery and Underwear
in a very large variety of approved styles

Reule, Conlin, FIegel Co. I

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READY AT YOUR SERVICE

Correct Spring Attire for Men

Suits
Balmacaans
Topcoats
Raincoats

$15 to $30
$12 to $25
$8 to $20
$8 to $18

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Lindenschmitt, Apfel & Go.

Fine Spring Haberdashery
Headquarters bor Manhattan Shirts, $1.50 to $4.00
Perrin's Spring Gloves. Beautiful Spring Neckwear
The World's Best Underwear
Hosiery and other Quality Fixings

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DIET I2RLE AND RUNDELL
TAILORS
NINTY-FOUR WEST FORT STR-EET
DETROIT, MICII.
FORMERLY WM. E. DIETERL U
SPRING ORDERS TAKEN NO I

ON THE WAY TO THE BANK
DON'T FORGET

DEAN' S F R ERESH
ROASTED
A FULL
PEANUTS l0c. POUNS

The fact that the Uiversity of Mich-
igan is an international institution is
shown by the large percent of foreign
students yearly. Also, the faculty is
dependent upon international cooper-
ation for the achievement of the high-
est results in each particular field of
endeavor, since every science taught
has been built up by the cumulative
services of men-in every nation in the
successive ages.
The university throughout its differ-
ent departments, maintain courses of
instruction that stimulate interest in
international relations and tend to de-
velop a more intelligent public opin-
ion concerning human fraternity and
the solidarity and unity of all social
interest.
The rapid financial and educational
progress of -the different republics
south of the Rio Grande have forced
the whole United States to stop and
consider. American business men are
seeking the markets of these nations.
American youths forsee a business or
professional future in Spanish Amer-
ica. Years ago the commerce of these
nations was practically monopolized
by the European merchants. For rea-
sons easily understood by students of
commerce, or of national'politics, to-
day the U. S. merchant ships are the
only transports which can travel safely
through the tropical and southern
seas. The decrease in export products
has compelled the different industries
and manufacturers to lower expenses,
thus decreasing the opportunities in
the various fields of work, to profes-
sional American men.
Therefore, having such an opportu-
nity knocking at our doors, offering
us a new commerce, and a new field
where our ambitious men can spend
their energy in a way beneficially to
both themselves and their employers,
will it not be advantageous to us to
learn something about the history ac-
companying these countries-a knowl-
edge of Latin-American history that
would help us to understand them bet-
ter, and at the same time show them
that we have some interest in their
welfare?
The university has always stood for
educational progress. It was one of
the first universities to put the Span-
Ish language on the same basis with
other modern languages. We must al-
so give credit to Michigan for having
in its curriculum a special course in
English for its foreign students. The
need of knowledge of the history of
Latin-America is felt strongly through-
out the educated world. Let us play
fair; if in every college in -Latin-
America, they teach United States his-
tory, why should we not teach Latin-
American history in our colleges, es-
pecially in a college of high repute
both at home and abroad. Already
several American colleges have added
a course of this nature to their cur-
ricula. What is Michigan going to do?
There is no doubt that Latin-Amer-
ica will play a much more important
part in the future affairs of this coun-
try than it has in the past. It seems
less certain than the history course
under consideration would materially
advance our knowledge of the import-
ant facts concerning our sister re-
publics; but those who should know
best about it seem to think it would do
so.
I think the time has come for every
Michigan student to consider the ben-
efit of the addition of such a course to
the lists of history subjects, and for

Our patrons' interest carefully
considered.
Our best reference is those who
have dealt with us.
Our success indicates our ability
to please.
If you have failed to get satis-
faction elsewhere give us a trial.
We will please you
Temple Theatre
ADMISSION So.
(except Friday and Saturday)
Friday-"O'Garry of the Royal Mount-
ed.'-
Saturday-'The Ambitious Baron" with
Francis X. Bushman.

The Big Store

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Look at our Show Windows for

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CANDY SPECIALTIES
Every day in the week.
THE SUGAR BOWL
104 S. Main St.

200-202
SouthMain St.

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Orpheum Theatre
The House of Famous Playa by Famous
Players.
April 26 27, Mon.-Tucs.-W. H. Crane in
"David Harfum." 5 parts.
April 28, Wed.-Katherine Kaeired in
"Your Girl and Mine," in 5 parts.
Price 15 cents.
April 29-3o.,Thurs.-Fri:-Winifred Kingc-
ton in "The Love Route." 4 parts.
Arcade Theatre
SHOWS:AFTERNOONS 4;00: EVE. 6:15; 7:45; 9:15
Wednesday, April 28-Vivian Martin in
"The Arrival of Perpetua," 5-pt.World
Film. Special matinee at 2:30.
Thursday, April 29-"The Millionaire's
Hundred Dollar Bill," with Leah
Baird, 2-part drama. A Foothill
Problem," i-part drama. Also a 1-
part comedy and a i-part drama.
Friday, April 30-Robert ]Edeson in "The
Girl I Left behind Me," 5-part Fox fea-
ture. Igxtra matinee at 2:0

DIAMOND MOUNTINGS
STONE SETTING
FINE REPAIRING OF JEWELRY

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HALLER JEWELRY CO.
STATE STREET JEWELERS

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Attention Seniors
Now is the opportune time
to be measured for
and
NO CEPOSIT WITH MEASURE

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Men's Spring Hats
EVERYTHING
THE LATEST
In Hats for Spring
STYLE
Is Our Motto
Get Your Hat Today
FACTORy SAT STORE
118 E.Alo HwWSt.
nr, Allenel Hotel W.W. MANN.Prop

nry &
711 N. VNIVERSITY

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--Nonmnations for thOe officers of next
year's Michigan Union will appear in
tomorrow's issue of The Daily.
--Searcity of students wishing to work
at odd jobs has been hampering the
Michigan Union employment bureau
during the past few days. Students
wishing employment have been re-
quested to leave names and telephone
numbers at the counter in the Union
lobby.
-Websteir-Alplha Nu Cup Debate,
which was to have been held tonight,
has been postponed until Wednesday,
May 5.
-Miller i. Pontius, '14, is spending a
few days in Ann Arbor. He has been
employed by an automobile concern
in Detroit during the winter and is
paying his alma mater a short visit.
Last fall he acted as coach at the Uni-
versity of Tennessee where he was
successful in developing a champion-

Arrangements have been completed
to hold the Alpha Nu banquet at the
Michigan Union at 6:00 o'clock May
6. The members of the literary soci-
ety had first planned to hold the ban-
quit before spring vacation. The un-
suitableness of the date, made them
postpone it.
The committees in charge promise
that a good program will be in store.
The date comes the night after the Web-
ster-Alpha Nu debate, and the team
will. be enthusiastically received.
1915 Laws Place Class Dues at $1.50
Class dues for the entire year have
been announced as $1.50, by the fin-
ance committee of the senior law class.
The lump tax is levied as a result of
a budget recently compiled by the fin-
aice committee of the class, and in-
cludes the payment of all past debts of
the class. The individual assessment of
$1.50, is made in order that all past
and present debts of the class may be
settled, excepting the memorial fund.
The treasurer and his assistants are
planning to have a table in the corri-
dor of the law building all day Tues-
day in an effort to have the money
collected as soon as possible..

the faculty to study the possibilities of
introducing such a course in 1915-
1916, if the University of Michigan is
to lead all other colleges in the prog-
ress toward education.
JOAQUIN MASFERRER, '15E0.
Fresh Lit Tryouts to Practice Today
Charles Lambert, who was elected
captain of the fresh lit baseball team
yesterday, wishes all candidates to
turn out for practice at 3:00 o'clock
:today at south Ferry field. At the
first call for All-Fresh baseball try-
outs about 125 reported. Not all of,
these were successful on the yearling
team but there is an opportunity for
some to make the yearling lit squad.

FRANK BRIGHT TO SPEAK TO
CLASS IN JOURNALISM TODAY
Will Talk on Subject "What I Expect
of a Cub"; Secure Other
Newspaper Men
Frank Bright,city editor of the Detroit
Times, will speak on- "What I Expect
of a Cub," before the classes in jour-
nalism at 4:00 o'clock today, in room
203 University hall. The lecture' _is
open to the general public, and in view
of the practical nature of the discus-
sion by a man "fresh from the firing
lines" of every day newspaper work,
a large attendance is expected.
Several newspaper men have" been
secured to speak beforeMr. Bryson's,
classes in newspaper work this semes-
ter, among whom are B. C. Wilson,
Michigan manager of the Associated1
Press; S. D. R. Smith, Michigan man-'
ager of the United Press; Burt Thom-j
as, cartoonist on the Detroit News;
Mrs. E. H. McCormack, dramatic crit-
ic of the Detroit Times; and possibly
James Keeley, of the Chicago Herald.
GOING TO WHITMORET
LAKEVIEW HOTEL OPENS
Saturday May 1st. Phone 4 Whit-
more Lake Exchange. Special Chick-,
en Dinner Sunday, 50c.

ALL-FRESH BASEBALL TEAM
PREPARES FOR NORMAL Gt
Lineup Will Probably Be Same as '
of Last Week; Andrus or
Miller Are Possibilities
Michigan's 1915 All-Fresh base

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team had a good practice yesterday af-
ternoon and the game was also a good
means of preparing the freshmen for
their encounter of Saturday at Ypsi-
lanti. Andrus and "Rails" Miller per-
formed in good order and reports say
that one of these hurlers will start the
Normal game. The lineup to be used
has not been definitely decided but it
is expected that the same men will
oppose the Normalites that played'last
week.
Last week the men from the Normal
were stopped in the middle of their
rally and are hot after the yearlings
with revenge as their end.
Junior law baseball at South Ferry
field today at 3:00 o'clock.

Call 1812-M Cook Taxi Co.

tf

Shoes repaired while you rest. 0. G.
Andres, 222 8. State St. eod Tu

They are Betting Even at Lloyd's
that the war will end by Sept. ist. We'll bet
you even that if you take a little fifteen' dollar
Victrola with you the next time you go canoe-
ing, you'll show your girl the best time yet.
Come down and look them over;
it won't cost you a cent.

LOST-Black leather loose leaf note
book on M. C. train, April 19. Please
call Henderson, Phone 344.
University A'-,e. Pharmacy Drugsj
and toilet articles. Phone 416. tfi:

Buy shoes and satisfaction
same time from Gross & Dietze:
Washington St.

GRINNELL BROS.

120-122 E. Liberty

University Ave. P

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