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April 30, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-30

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e

Michigan

Daily

MAILED

SUBSCRIBE
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is ._ ago ._:,.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

r t
._____

6

e-- o.
E
,a!

M'MAHON APPEARS
IN MINSTREL SHOW,

HOLD TRADITIONAL
SWING-UT MAY 11
Seniors Will Don Their Caps and Gowns
for First Time and March
Around Campus
FINISH PROGRAMS WITH PLACE
OF MEETINGS TO BE NOTED

and
e;

TODAY
"Cotton Ball" dance at
o'clock.

Program Contains Raggy
Lots of Laughter
Musical Stars

Tunes and
by

Union, 9:30

VARSITY QUARTET TO APPEAR
AT TOMORROWS BAND CONCERT
Uniiion Opera Muslto Feature First
Outdoor .Appearance of
Musicians
By way of a feature at the first
open-air band concert at the can,1pus
grandstand at 6:45 o'clock tomorrow
night, the Varsity quartet will sing the
song from Michigenda, "When Night
Falls Dear," and also the "Toast to
Michigan."
The Varsity quartet is made up of
Kenneth N. Westerman, grad., C. T.
Bushnell, '15, W. S. Westerman, '18,
and U. S. Wilson, '16. If the idea
of introducing singing at the concerts
proves successful, it is likely that the

ELECT 38 SENIORS
TO PHl BETA WI~
Largest -Number Ever Elected Rece
Highest Scholastic Honors; 17
Men and 21 Womien
Chosen
YPSILANTI NoRMAL SECURES.
LARVEST BOI)Y OF INIAT

Be Made

of the state
was passed
n of $350,000
library and
s signature.
d the house
o 10, it was
t would go

Union minstrel show in Hill auditori-
um, 8:00 o'clock.
Frank Bright speaks on "What I Ex-
pect from a Cub,"' in room 203 Uni-
versity hall, 4:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Golf clubmeets at Union, 1:15 o'clock.
Varsity track meet, Ferry field, 2:00
o'clock.
Baseball-Michigan vs. Cases, Ferry
field, 3:00 o'clock.
Union membership dance at Union,
9:00 o'clock.
Need Candidates for Fresh Law Team
Captain Hewitt and Manager San-
ders of the fresh law baseball team
are in need of more candidates at
south Ferry field to take part in the
daily practice of that team. Practice
sessions are held at 3:00 o'clock on
South Ferry field.

Report Large Sale of Tickets
House-Campaigning:
Method

ThroughIwill

Give All-Senior Dance
Week in Place of Night
Celebration

During
of

Professor Beman Selected
and Prof. Bradshaw
Vice-President

DRESS REHEARSAL AT UNION
BIDS FAIR FOR MAMMOTH SHOW

n meas-
of $175,-

f the
n up
until
will

"T

Pres
as

PEN OUTDOOR
;K TOMORROW

George P. McMahon, '16, will appear
at the Boat club minstrel show in Hill
auditorium at 8:00 o'clock tonight in
spite of the recent rumor to the con-
trary. Surprising promise was shown
in the rehearsal yesterday afternoon
and heavy ticket sales have been re-
ported.
The program which will be present-
ed tonight will run as follows:
Opening: "Night Time Down in Dixie
Land."
"Chummy Chum Chum"-Otto Wismer,
'15L.
"All the World Loves a Lover"-Har-
ry E. Carlson, '17E.
"Ballin' the Jack"-G. McClure, '15,
and chorus.
"Don't You Cry My Honey"-Ritchie.
"Rufus Johnson's Harmony Band"-
Thomas Doyle, '15L.
"Loves Own Sweet Song" (whistler)
-Abraham Hart, '17.
"Fifty-fifty"---Harold Schradzki, '15L.'
"Somewhere a Voice is Calling"--U.
S. Wilson, '16.
"Alexander Jones"-Leroy Scanlon,
(Continued on page 6)
REIANSELECTS
Y. A. C. A. President Picks Chairmen
for 1916 at Meeting of New
and Old Bodies

Donning their caps and gowns for
the first time, the seniors from all the
departments in the university will cel-
ebrate "Swing-Out" on Tuesday after-
noon, May 11, and march around the
campus, according to the traditional
custom. The date of the event was
set at a recent meeting of the presi-
dents of the senior classes.
The exercises will be held at 4:30
o'clock in the afternoon in University
Hall, following which the promenade
around the campus will occur. With
the exception of the address which
will be given by President Harry B.
Hutchins, the program is yet unar-
ranged.
The times and places where the var-
ious classes will assemble have not
been announced as yet, but few chang-
es will be made in the plans of last
year. No all-senior dance will be held
on the night of "Swing-Out" this sea-
son, as was the case last year, al-
though an all-senior dance will prob-
ably be held during that week.
In the evening at 7:00 o'clock will
occur an all-senior sing on the steps
0f Memorial hall.

practice will be continued.
The Varsity band will give an all-
Michigan song program tomorrow
night, the music being taken from the
past Union operas. Among the music
which has been orchestrated are se-
lections from "The Crimson Chest,"
"The Awakened Rameses," "Michi-
genda," "Culture," and "Contrarie
Mary." The music from the last two
operas, "A Model Daughter" and "All
That Glitters" will be orchestrated in-
to band music in the near future.
TOLEDO WILL- SEE'
MIC~GANTEN'NIS'
Team of Six to Leave Tomorrow at
11:30 O'block for Maumee
City
ANNOUNCE COMPLETE SCHEDULE
Michigan's tennis team journeys to
Toledo tomorrow to meet the Toledo.
Tennis club team in the afternoon in
the opening match oil the Wolverines
schedule, the team leaving at 11:30

Contests;

Se

TI

cials SOPHS SEEM TO HAVE ADVANTA(E
ioof, .-
fut- Michigan's outdoor track season will

open tomorrow afternoon,

_~ I,

held
iel- with the Varsity meet figuring as the
ruc-
introductory struggle.
Last season this meet was the final
RS appearance of the Varsity squad in
actual competition, on Ferry field and
In- several of the best records of the year
were hung up. The times and marks
will undoubtedly prove much slower
- tomorrow, as it will be the first out-

CERCLE PRESENTS1
POLIS.HEDCOMEDY
Lloyd Curby, As Dr. Malingear Proves
To Be Star Because of His Super-
ior Acting Ability

ANNOUNCES POLICIES FOR YEAR MUCH CREDIT DUE TO MR. H. WANN

e_

;ry, a part of
r by the hon-
committee of
lated, and the
on the bulle-
floor hall of
A summary
-stem at Yale,
and Wesley-
d in the tabu-
use at other
from day to

nay be made by the com-
cure representative stu-
>me of the larger colleges,
stem is in use, to come to
nd speak to the students
eering college upon the
:he honor system. If these
.red, a mass meeting will
student leaders in the
college will be asked to
nions to the student body.
key, '16E, a junior mem-
mmittee, has been chosen
he next meeting probably
he first of next week.
|GA ALPHA ELECTS
IOR MEDICS MEMBERS
ga Alpha, national honor-
society, elected the fol-
ers of the junior medical
fold, at a meeting held
Harold Henderson, Lyle
Warren Vaughan, Carl
G. Galbraich.
ien to be elected into the
during the next college
chosen by the five elected

door actual competition for the ma-
jority of the athletes.
It was at the Varsity meet last year
that "Chink" Bond ran the 220-yard
dash in 21 seconds flat, a fifth of a sec-
and under the world's record, al-
though the claim was never allowed.
Seward did the 100 the same day in
9 4-5, and Jansen tied the Ferry field
record of 48 3-5 in the quarter. All
of these men were in top form, and go-
ing at their best.
The-seniors won the meet with 41
points, the sophomores standing sec-
and with 37, the freshmen third with
20, and the juniors last with 5. This
season the sophs, who finished third
as freshmen last season, seem to have
an edge, on paper at least.
Ufe: won the mile last year in 4:34,
but the chances are that he will start
the half this year. Ferris won the
broad jump with a leap of 21 feet 10
inches.
Max Robinson has been slightly un-
der the weather the past few days
with a bad leg, but he hopes to be in
shape Saturday to start the quarter.
PATIENT LOSING VITAL FORCE;
FEAR CHENOT MAY DIE TODAY
Physicians Shatter Hope That Second
Operation on Heart May Be
Performed
With inherent vitality gradually los-
ing hold of the force which it has con-
tributed during the past week to sus-
tain the life of James Chenot, '16, little
hope was offered this morning that he
would survive for the next 24 hours.
At ,3:25 o'clock A. M., authorities at
Grace hospital in Detroit, where the
patient is confined, said that his con-

At the meeting of the old and new
Y. M. C. A. cabinets held last night in
Newberry hall, Lewis C.Reimann, '17L,
newly elected president of the "Y"
made the following cabinet appoint-
ments for the following year: Social:
service chairman, Everett Judson,
'16E, chairman of tmn meetings com-
mittee, Paul Wagner, '16E; chairman
of the religious education committee,
Waldo R. Hunt, '16; publicity chair-
man, Whitley Moore, '18E; deputation
chairman, P. C. Lovejoy, '16.
In addition to these men, the presi-
dents of the departmental units and
a representative from each of the local
evangelical churches will have a seat
on the central cabinet.
At the meeting last night, the pres-
ident announced his policies for the
coming year, and the retiring presi-
dent, William C. Mullendore, '16L,
spoke briefly of what has been ac-
complished during the past year and
what the opportunities for the work
are during the next two semesters.
It was decided to read -a brief 5-
minute report of the work accomplish-
ed during the yea-r at the Majestic
meeting Sunday night, at which Dr.
Mabel Ullrichs of Milwaukee, Wis.,
will speak.
A committee was appointed to take'
up the matter of the $900 shortage on
t; e Busrah budget and to consider
ways and means of making up the de-
ficit.
dition was very low, and that the loss
of vitality was beginning to tell.
Chenot's physicians yesterday shat-
tered the hope that another operation
might be attempted in an effort to sew
up the leak in the side of his heart.
The patient's condition, they said,
would not warrant such an operation.

With a polish that was truly pro-
fessional, the ninth annual play of the
Cercle Francais, "La Poudre aux
Yeux," was presented to an apprecia-
tive audience last night at the Whitney
theater. Members of the faculty, who
viewed the performance, expressed
their satisfaction at the ease with
which every role was handled. In
fact, the cast was so well balanced
that it can be said that every member
starred in his or her individual part.
Lloyd Curby, '17L,portrayed the part'
of Doctor Malingear with such ability
that he easily stood apart from the
rest, not only because of his excellent
pronunciation, but because of his act-
ing which aptly portrayed the breezy,
irritable, but at the same time affec-
tionate father. Lucie Buechler, grad.,
as Madame Malingear, won applause
by her careful interpretation of the
scheming wife and mother, who was
persistent in ier endeavor to find a
suitable match for her daughter.
This part, Emmeline, was in the
hands of Adele Crandall, '17. Her
presentation of the quiet, unassuming,
little bourgeois maiden would have
been hard to better, and she fitted
aptly into her role. Oncle Robert, the
big-hearted, blunt old mediator, who
seemed to be the untangler of the
twisted web of the plot, was handled
by Walter Atlas, '18, and his stage
presence and earnest portrayal of his'
role caused an unusual amount of
praise from all sides.
In the curtain raiser, "Il Faut qu'une
Porte Soit Ouverte ou Fermee," a real
artist was discovered in the person of
Ruth Crandall, '15. No fault could be
found with her presentation of the
Marquise. Her pronunciation was
good and her acting was well done.
(Continued on page 6)

o'clock, and playing nine matches in
the Buckeye town. Six men will make
the trip, Captain Reindel, Crawford,
Mack, and Switzer being the men who
will surely go while the other two men
who will make the trip will be decided
upon by this afternoon's showing.
The-matches will be played on the
courts of the Toledo Tennis club, and
the opposition which the Wolverines
will meet at this time will prove most
valuable as training for the eastern
trip of the quartet of the men which
will make up the final team. The show-
ing of the men on the two trips, to To-
ledo and Detroit, will also figure in
determining the make-up of the east-
ern team.
The Toledo tennis men are all vet-
erans who have played in the oig mid-
dle western tournaments for the past
years. Shaw is a strong player who
has ben prominent in the Michigan
State tournament at Detroit, as have
his team-matcs the Cummings broth-
ers who make a strong doubles pair.
Cone plays a good singles game, and
coupled . with Shaw the two should
form a formidable double team.
Correy, who has come as near the
doubles title of Michigan as the the
finals, will also face Captain Reindel's
men. Correy was a student at Am-
herst College, and while there he was
the mainstay of the Varsity tennis
team, holding the position of captain
during his term of attendance.
The advantages of club play for the
college team are marked. In playing
against club teams the college play-
ers get experience in better tennis
than is usually to be secured in inter-
collegiate competition. The fact that
the Harvard schedule of 11 games
contains only five intercollegiate
matches is testimony to the validity
of this fact.
With the final ratification of the To-
ledo and Detroit dates the whole of
the tennis schedule is officially an-
nounced, every Saturday date for the
rest of the college year being account-
ed for. The complete schedule fol-
lows:
(Continued on page 6.)

Phi Beta Kappa elected 38 members
of the 1915 senior lit class into mem-
bership at its meeting yesterday af-
ternoon. Of these, 17 were men, and
21 women. This is the largest num-
ber. of initiates to be elected into Phi
Beta Kappa since its foundation here
in 1907. Last year, only 30 were
chosen, and of these, 19 were women.
The number constitutes about five per-
cent of the number of students in the
senior class. -
The average age of those chosen
for membership will be 24 and 1-2
years at the time of their graduation
in June. Of these, 15 entered on ad-
vanced standing, 21 entered on certif-
icate of diploma, while two entered
on examination. The elections were
made at the annual regula1' meeting of
the local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.
Those elected into membership with
their place of graduation are: Hul-
dah Bancroft, Ann Arbor; Albert A.
Bennett, Ann Arbor; Vera M., .ur-
ridge, M.S.N.C. (1); Helen L. Clark,
Ann Arbor; Marjorie Delavan, Alma
H. S.; Roy R. Fellers, Tri-State col-
lege (1 1-2); Ethel M. Fox, M.S.N.C.
(2); Judith Ginsburg, Detroit C.H.S.;
Clarence B. Goshorn, Grand Rapids,
C. H. S.; Harry M. Hawley, Ann Ar-
bor; Florence G. Haxton, Oakfield, N.
Y.; Garrett Hoyns, J. Calvin college
(2); Mabel D. Hinds, U. of Ind. and
Winona college (1 1-2); Russell D.
Kilborne, Dickinson Sem. Pa. (1 1-2);
Dakuin K. Lieu, China (1 yr. Eng.
col.); Walter G. Marburger, Slippery
Rock, Pa. S.N.C. 1 yr.); oward .
Marsh, Jackson; Florence K. Mid-
daugh, Jackson; Lena B. Mott, Dowa-
giac; Margaret C. Page, Flint; Wil-
liam A. Paton, M.S.N.C. (1); Mary T.
Perkins, M.S.N.C. Columbia Un.; Ben
E. Perry, Exam; Vine B. Peters, Char-
lotte; Mary M. P'urdy, Crafton, Pa;
Sadie F. Robinson, Detroit C. H. S.;
Clara G. Roe, Flint; Dorothy M.
Roehm, Detroit C. H. S.; Evelyn G.
Roehm, Detroit W. H. S.; Howard D.
Roelofs, Amherst college (2); Ernest
C. Roth, LaSalle, Ill.;Howard F. Seely,
Ann Arbor; Clara R. Stahl, Greens-
boro, N. C. college (2); Beatrice E.
Stanton, M.S.N.C. (2); Clarence Vliet,
M.S.N.C. (2; Lenda Lu'cile White,
Blissfield; Anna L. Gieske, M.S.N.C.
(2); and Joseph G. Wolber, Exam.
Michigan State Normal college
claims, the greatest number of affili--
ates, six having entered Michigan
from there. Ann Arbor high school is
close behind, with five to its record,
while Detroit Central high school has
three graduates among the initiates.
Flint high school and Jackson high
school each have two graduates, and
the remaining number are scattered
among schools and colleges all over
the country.
Prof. Bliss Perry, of Harvard Uni-
versity, has been secured to give the
public address on Saturday, May 8, in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, but the ex-
act hour has not yet been determined.
The initiation banquet will be held af-
ter the address in Barbour gymnasium.
Officers for the year of 1915-16 were
elected at the meeting, and Prof. W.
W. Beman was chosen president. Prof.
J. W. Bradshaw is secretary and treas-
urer. Dean John R. Effinger and Prof.
Campbell Bonner were held over on
the executive committee, while Prof.
J. S. P. Tatlock was elected to fill the
only vacancy.

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ALL STARS

* * * *

11

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