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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 29, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE' MICHIGAN DAILY

--_ -
"

nL
]RIES
in Science
very
"H WORK

zoological
in the Un

lab-

author-
designing
ries and
.e of the
is to be
.er of the

his de-
in its

e and his associates
rk in charge have
h every zoological
in this country and
r countries so that
design and accom-
be planned for the
ent. Not only are
Lmulated experience
it they themselves
m their own exper-
any new and here-
lities in the way of
oratories and room
n will be used for
the storing of am-
nple of some of the
ligan will have un-
'his cave will be 10
nd will be provided
r, aquaria, and con-
facilities. This is
one place in the
nous laboratory at
arest approach to it
semi-cave used for
ly at the University
e Professor La Rue
>f the idea for this
will be the large
>n the first floor of
h will be fitted up
m of skeletons in
ipment will be fur-
idlng of large ani-
ly adjoining, there
room which will be
e preparation and
s. This room is to
ventillation system
e the difficulties en-
such work in the
At present bones
either be purchas-
mrces or the work

F
r r
ti
I'
7A
M

L7

Y "
i/ a "
t
MIGHEST
VAU't

FOR YOUNG MEN

CLOTHES OF CHARACTER

A superior garment makes its presence felt
without Challenging undue attention-enhancing
the wearer's personality without vying with it.
Our complete assortment of models and
fib ics make it comparatively easy for a man to
obtain individuality in hiQ .personal attire-an
individuality that will makz him feel better
dressed without thinking it.
Our Furnishing and 'Hat Departments will
afford you an excellent selection in all the attrib-
utes to young mens attire.
We invite -your inspection while in Detroit.
B AUiMGARTNER'

Young Men's Shop

GRAND RIVER AVENUE

AT
WASHINGTON BLVD.
- DETROIT

SEUM T OOBTAIM
LouE cuLlECTON
.Case Discovers Large Bone-Bed
exas; Senres Over 1,500
single Speceiinen
OUNT ONLY 1NE OF SPECIES
In the last few years, the Univer ty
of Michigan has been especially for-
tunate in acquiring specimens of ex-
tinct life. Notable among these is a
collection nnade by an expedition to
the Permuian beds of Texas, in 191
Pr;.'. ,C. Case has been especially
>ierested in this particular field, in
connection with his work for the Car-
7.gie Institution of Wshington Ile
has published for them four moo-
graphs on the Permian Vertebr-.os
and has a fifth now in press.
On one f htrips he discovered a
barge bone-bed in Texas, and in the
next year, the university sent an expe-
dition to recover the material. As a
: esult over 1,500 single specimens
were brought hak, the largest single
collection ever made From the bone
collected it has been possible to r-
store the cotplete skeletons of sev-
eral of the rarest specimens.
One of thes, a large lizard-like
creature, Dnetrodon Incisivus Cope,
is remarkable for an enormous thin
crest along tize back, which has led
io its being called the "fin-backed lz-
ard" This specimen is now in process
of preparation by Dr. Troxel, of Yale
and will be sent here on its completion.
It is over 20,000,000 years old, and will
be the only one of its kind on exhi-
bition.
The labor required in the collection
and preparation of the skeletons of ex-
tinct form is not generally appreciat-
ed. After the specimen has been gath-
ered with the utmost care in the field,
it is brought to the laboratory where
each bone is carefully freed from stony
matrix. The bones are then placed in
proper positions with studied care and
finally mounted, either as a complete
skeleton, or in a plastered slab which
serves to preserve the fragile members
and natural position of the animal.
The preparation of this specimen by
Dr. Troxel will require three months,
and it is hoped that it will be on ex-
.iition before Commencement.
B ASKETRALLER S TA E ChARGE
At as Officials at Union Membership
Dance on Saturday
Basket Ball is the official title of the
Michigan Union membership dance
which will be presented at the club-
house Saturday night, when committee-
men and chaperons interested In bas-
ketball will have charge.
Howard Warner, '16, will act as
<1'airman, and committeemen assist-
"ig him will be Charles E. Stone, '16,
R. L. Drummond, '18k, and C. Fischer,
'1. Chaperons who have been secured
to supervise the party are: Prof. R. W.
Aigler and Mrs. Aigler, and Mr.
W. F. Marsteller, and Mrs. Marsteller.
Numerous features applicable to the
indoor sport so popular during the.
winter will be introduced. Pasteboards
go on sale after 5:00 o'clock today at
the Union counter at 50 cents each for
Union members.
DR. MABEL ULRICIIS TO SPEAK
AT Y. M. C. A. SUNIAAY MEETINQ
Dr. Mabel Ulrichs, of Minneapolis,
Minn., has been secured by the univer-
sity Y. M. C. A., for next Sunday even-

ing. According to the "Y" officials,
the place of holding the meeting has
not been definitely decided upon, but
it will be announced tomorrow,
Dr. Ulrichs addressed one of the
Majestic Sunday evening meetings last
year and she is spending part of this
week in a series of meetings among the
women at the Ypsilanti Normal co,
lege. She will spend Monday and Tues-
dey of next week in. Ann Arbor in hold-
ing a series of meetings for univer-
sity women,
Engineers Give "shirt Waist" Iance
Banjaurine music will feature the
spring "Shirt Waist" party' of the sen
ior engineering claNs, which is to be
held from 9:00 to 1:00 o'clock tonight
at the Union. A sfecial orchestra has
been secured to play the dance num-
bers. The chaperones will be Mr. and
Mrs. E. F. Hughitt and Mr. and Mrs.
Allan Ricketts.

i

Z3

C

e 30,000 gallon cistern will
:clusively for providing soft
the various aquaria which
t plans call for. There will
uarium rooms, one of which
ed for research work, two
oom work and one large
-h will be used for combined
research work. Specifica-
call for a miniature fish
which. will furnish special
the study of embryonic
efeature, found in but few
oratories in this country,
demonstration room. This
be furnished with working
and will be used as a study
onsultation room where the
ho are having difficulty may
problems cleared up by
ual demonstrations on the
aestion.
BALL TO TAKE PLACE
how Quartet, Programs and
t Togs Add to Dance
y members of the quartet
t club mipstrel show, elab-
programs'trimmed in red,
ummer togs will character-
t Cotton Ball billed for the
n 9:30 to 2:00 o'clock to-
ight. The only damper
rations was the with-
Walter Niemann, '17, from
tee, due to an operation on
ed committee now stands:
n, '15, general chairman in.
all Union dances for the
. Ainsworth, '15, chairman
on Ball, Karl F. Walker,
Nance, '17, W. F. Holmes,
R. Schradzki, '15L, and.

STUDENT TELLS OF:
4MILITARY CAMPING
In Letter, Outlines Methods Employed
by Government in Conducting
Semi-Cadet School

I'

Squad

RESULS OF SPRENG PRACTICE
APPEAR IN WORK OF PILAYEWS

Spends Part of TimeIe Watching
Varsity Baseball Game
Yesterday
9 *

David Starr Jordan, Pean Chas.
Brown, Dr. eorge A. Gordon
Will Be Among Spealkers

WESLEYAN GUILTI MAKES KNOWN
NNEXT YEAR'S LECTURE PROGRAM

I. LORD KI TCHELL LECTURE S
ON GLACIER' NATIONAL PARK
Says "Scenery in United States Equals
Any in Europe;" Many Beauti'ni
Slides Are Shown

R.

Coach Yost's athletes, after one day
without the guiding eye of their men-(
tor, spent part of their time yesterday
in working out, and part in taking
occasional glances at the Varsity base-

Advance engagements for next year's
Wesleyan Giiid lecturers,, show that
chc quality of the previous speakers
I will be maintained, if not bettered. Six
of the speakers have made arrange-
ments to appear in Ann Arbor, while.

VARIED

1"NSTRIJCTION

GIVEN

J. R. Darnall, '16-'18M, local secre-
tary for the National Reserve corps,
who was in attendance last year at the
military~ camp held by the Department
of War, at Ludington, Mich., has just
sent a letter to Prof. L. M. Gram, of
the engineering college, in which he
outlines the work of the summer camp.'
The letter says that last year's camp
was the first to be held in the middle
west, and that students were present
from Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri and
Michigan. Although Michigan had only
seven students at the camp, she won
the rifle contest, defeating Minnesota
and Illinois, colleges which have com-
pulsory military training. The stu-
dents at the camp were placed on a
semi-strict cadet basis, and were treat-
ed as officers, and not as privates. The
food,, according to the letter, was.better
than that given to regular soldiers,
and far surpassed that offered by any
Ann Arbor boarding house. Optional
instruction was offered in advanced
military tactics, rifle practice, baseball,
tennis, swimming, canoeing and riding.
Cavalry horses were provided free of
charge to students who cared to ride.
The camp is located on high ground
overlooking Lake Michigan, and is sit-
uated between two large summer re-
sorts. A number of dances and moon-
light parties were given for the stu-
dent soldiers by the young ladies of
the resorts, according to the letter. The"
average cost to students for the five
weeks at camp amounted to about $30.

ball game. The men are beginning to
show the effects of the st!renuous
spring practice. To an observor who
watched some of the preliminary work-
outs and again on yesterday, the
change was especially noticeable. The
men are putting vim and pepper in to
the training in spite of the heat. Their
methods of tackling and blocking, for
example, have improved to a rather
marked degree under the tutelage of
the coach.
The work of the squad has been
comprised, for the most part, of those
rudiments of the game which are usu-
ally neglected by the majority of prep
school coaches. The duty of instruct-I
ing the players in this part of the
game devolves each year upon the
coach and his assistants. Some of the
men are versed in these lines, but the
majority have had only a year on the
freshman squad or upon the inter-
class teams.
So far, the veterans to appear have
been very few. Captain Cochran has
appeared regularly, and Bastian has
appeared -late at several of the drills,
but the remainder of the men have
been conspicuous by their absence for
the most part. Many of the 'R' men
have shown up with considerable reg-
ularity, this list including Hildner,
Finkbeiner, Cohn, Roehm, Calvin and
Millard. The 1918 freshman team has
been well represented. Dunn, Ray-
mond, the Schultz brothers, along with
others have been regular attendants at
the daily workouts.
It looks now as though 'Germany'
Schultz will not come to Ann Arbor to
aid Coach Yost. In letters written
some time before the opening of the
training period, the assistant coach
said that he would attempt to get here
for at least a portion of the time. Noth-I
ing has been heard lately, and it is
mnore than likely that he will not show
up.

the remainder of the lecturers will
not be announced until some time next
fall as has always been the custom.
David Starr Jordan, chancellor of
Leland Stanford Junior university, will
speak here on October 31. This is one
of the special features of the coming
lectures. He will discuss peace from
a biological standpoint.
For November 14, Dr. Thos. Nichol-
son, of New York City, a secretary of
the board of education of the M. E.
Church, has been secured.
On November 28, Prof. Edward
Steiner, of Grinnell college, Iowa will
speak. Professor Steiner is well known
as a lecturer on various phases of
immigration, having written several
notable books on that subject,
For January 9, 1916, Dean Chas. R,
Brown, of- the Divinity School of Yale
university, whom the authorities of the
Wesleyan Guild tried to engage last
year, has been scheduled. !
April 130, Dr. George A. 'Gordon, of
the old South Church of Boston, one of
New England's greatest preachers, will
make his third visitto AnnArbor,
It is expected that the course will
be opened on October 17, shortly after
college opens, by Bishop, Homer C,
Stuntz, of Buenos Aires, Bishop Stuntz
has been in Buenos Aires for the last
year.
ANVNOUN(2E MARRIAGE OF RUTH
GRE ATUOUSE TO DIR. LEIGHTON
Announcement has just been made
of the marriage of Ruth Curtis Great-
house, '09, and Frederick Leighton,
'09M, on Monday April 26, at the home
of the bride, Washington, D. C. Mrs.
Leighton also received an M.S. degree
from the University of Michigan in '10,
while Dr. Leighton secured an A.B. at
Aniherst in '06. They will make their
home at Niagara Falls, N. Y.

Mr. Lord D. Kitchell gave a lect arc
in Hill auditorium last night on "A
T-eavelogue on Glacier National Park
and the Black Feet Indians." The
lecture was illustrated with beauti-
fully hand colored slides showing var-
ious' scenes in the park.. Motion pic-
tures depicting the native dances of
the Black Feet Indians 'were also
shown.
Mr. Kitchell said that Glacier Nat-
ional Park contains about 1,500 square
miles, and is one of the most beautiful
bits of scenery which we have in the
United States. He said that every
summer the park is visited by hun-
dreds of tourists some of whom go
through in automobiles, some on horse-
back while others go on foot. The
government is continually expending
money for the preservation of the park,
and has already built miles of ex-
cellent roads all through the' park.
Mr.' Kitchell began the illustrated
part of his lecture by showing the pic-
ture of an American flag above which
were the words "See America First,"
Mr. Kitchell then went on to say that,
we have scenery in this country which
is equal in every way to that in Europe.]
The lecture was very well attended.
CANOE MARATHON TO BE RUN
AT TIME OF UNION REGATTA,

rnett, '17. Several
still left at the

paste-
Union

gineers Hold Spring Party
engineers will hold their
ty from 8:30 to 12:00 o'clock
ght at Barbour gym. "Ike"
rchestra will play, and the
will be a feature of the
'ogram. Mr. and Mrs. F. H.

lnformation about the summer camps
and application blanks may be secured
from Prof. L. M. Gram, 322 engineer-
ing building, who has charge of the
local application office.
Bonisteel Passes Pharmic Examination
William J. Bonisteel, phar. spec., re-
ceived word today that he had passed
the state board examination for reg-
istered pharmacist's paper;,

, Entries for the water marathon to be
staged on the Huron from Lakeland to
Barton pond on the day of the Boat
club regatta, May 29, are now being
received at the Michigan Union club-
house. A map showing the course is
tacked to the score bulletin in the
lobbies, and information can be ob-
tained at the office.
The water marathon is one of the
biggest annual aquatic events, and
coupled with the championship race
to be held between Grand Rapids and
Detroit, will iake the regatta an affair:
of unusual interest. Kenneth W. Vance,
who is in charge of the endurance
water contest, is making arrangements
and is desirous of giving information
to those who will call number 357.

Hobart Guild to Elect Officers Today
Officers of the Hobart Guild of the
Episcopal church will be elected at the
annual meeting of the organization to
be held at 7:30 o'clock tonight in Har-
ris hall.
After the meeting, an informal danc-
ing party will occupy the remainder
of the evening. . All members are re-
quested to be present.

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