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April 25, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-25

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tie

Mich igan

Daily

I

SUBSCRIBE
NOw
$1.00

.

LOCAL

V

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

ERYE IN
RE GAME
on's Three Bag-
y to Trounce
2 to 0

RNERS THREE OF
'S SEVEN BINGLES

dh When
Two

Le first vic-
team on its
deserve was
Don in a 2
t the Cleve-
other count
dell scored
in theisev-
d the visit-
led himself
e in which
nselves dur-

TODAY
Rev. Henry Tatlock speaks at S. An-
drew's church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. 0, Lloyd Morris speaks at First
Congregational church, 10:30
o'clock.
Rev. Frank B. Bachelor speaks on
"The Messenger and the Message,"
First Baptist church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. A. W. Stalker speaks on "Wings
or Hands," First M. E. church, 10:30
o'clock.
Rev. Loring speaks on "Our Duty to
Encourage the Public Practice of
Free Speech in Social and Religious
Reform," at Unitarian church, 10:30
o'clock:
Professor David R. Friday speaks on,
"Taxation" before the Social Ser-
vice class, Unitarian church, 10:30
o'clock..
Members of the Cabinet hold luncheon
at Union, 6:00 o'clock.
Hon. Raymond Robins speaks on,
"Christian Statesmanship" in Hill
auditorium, 7:30 o'clock.
Prof. H. R. Cross speaks on "The He-
roes and the Prophets: of the Old Tqs-
tament in Art" before the Menorah
society in room B Memorial hall,
8:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Soph architects elect officers in room,
311 engineering building, 4:00
o'clock,
Michigan Dames society meets at New-
berry hall, 8:00 o'clock.

Student Canvassers Report Sum
Over $2,000, at Last Dinner
Held by Members of
Committee

BLANSHARD AND SCHROEDER
TALK ON BUSRAH IMPORTANCE

PAUL BLANSHARI}, '14, TALKS ON
SUBJECT, "APPEAL OF BUSRAH"

Chairman to Canvas Fraternities
Means of Upperclassman in
Each House

BUSRAH CAMPAIGN S.CgA.CONVENES AT
WILL CLOSE TODAY HILL AUDITORIUM

by 3eldrum and C. McMalIhon Will Render
Special Program of
Music

of Raymond Robins, of Chicago, to Speak
at 7:00 O'clock This Evening
on Topic, "Christian
Statesmanship"

uffered a slight
g short of the
n the southern
were garnered
iem being cred-
pite of the fact
been complain-
luring' the past
find the Cleve-
singles and a

Over $2,000 was the total sum as re-
ported by the captains at the last of
the Busrah dinners held last night in
the Methodist church parlors. Less
than half of the students engaged in
the canvass were present at the din-
ner, and according to P. C. Lovejoy,
'16, statistician of the campaign ex-
ecutive committee, this report is far
from the total sum of money that has
been subscribed to date. A final meet-
ing of the entire committee will be
held at 4:00 o'clock this afternoon in
the Methodist church, and it is expect-
ed that at that meeting a full report of
all funds raised will be available.
Paul B. Blanshard, '14, of Boston,
and W. W. Schroeder, '14-'16L, spoke
at the dinner last night and their re-
marks were in the nature of impress-
ing the importance of the Busrah proj-
ect as an educational opportunity up-
on the student body. Laura Feige, '15,
whose committee has raised $496 to
date, also spoke briefly on the methods
which she has followed in making her
canvass a success.
The following statement was issued
last night by Paul V. Ramsdell, '16,
general chairman of the campaign:
"The objective of this year's Busrah
campaign is to educate every Michi-
gan student, but it has been found im-
possible to solicit many of the frater-
nity men. The management is un-
willing, however, to intrude upon
chapter privacy with the appeal of an
outside committee. An effort will be'
made today, therefore, to secure a
committee of one upperclassman in
each fraternity house who will form-
ally present the facts of the Busrah
project to his fraternity in its regular
weekly meeting, and ask for pledges.
(Continued on page 6.)

With Raymond Robins, of Chicago,
and Paul B. Blanshard, '14, of Boston,
as the principal speakers on the pro-
gram, the S. C. A. will convene at 7:00
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium for
its fifty-seventh annual meeting. The
meeting will be one of the regular se-
fries of Hill auditorium union services,
several of which have been held this
year, and a number of the local
churches will dismiss their evening
services for it.
John Meldrum, of the school of mu-
sic, and George P. McMahon, '16, have
been secured for a special musical
program and President-Emeritus Jam-
es B. Angell will deliver the invoca-
tion. Werner W. Schroeder, '14-'16L,
president of the S. C. A., will preside.
Mr. Robins was the progressive nom-
inee for United States senator from
Illinois in the election last fall. He
will take as the subject of his address
tonight, "Christian Statesmanship."
He comes directly to Ann Arbor from
the University of Missouri where he
has been conducting a social service
campaign. In a recent campaign held
at the University of Wisconsin, he was
heard by the largest student audience
ever assembled to hear a single speak-
er.
Paul Blanshard will speak on "The
Appeal of Busrah," and he will en-
deavor to raise the remaining part of
the 1916 budget of $3,700, which has
not already been subscribed at that
time by the student body.
Appoint Prof. Trueblood as Delegate
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, of the
oratory department, has been appoint-
ed a delegate to the World Court Con-
gress, which meets at Cleveland May
12 to 15.

DEAN KLRCHWEY WILL_ ADRESS
I NT E RNATION AL POLITY CLUB
To Talk onI Somec Phaise of Organized
Millitary Trai'ning it
Un1iN-ersities
Deai George W. Kirchwey, dean of
the Columbia law school, has been se-
cured to give an address before the
members of the International Polity-
club and friends, Saturday evening
May 8, in University Hall.
Dean Kirchwey is a graduate of
Yale university, and is an authority
on law. He is the author of several
law books, and is at present editor of
the department of law of the Interna-
tional Encyclopedia. The subject of
Dean Kirchwey's address has not yet
been announced, but it will probably
be on some phase of the question of
militarism. Dean Kirchwey is oppos-
ed to organized military train-
ing in universities, but is not
radical on the subject and his
talk will be non-partisan. He
will deal with the subject from a sci-
entific viewpoint.
CANDIDATES FOR COMEDY CLUB
MEMBERSHIP )IEET THURSDAY
All prospective actors anid actresses
will meet with members of the Come-
dy club next Thursday to receive in-
structions and suggestions pertaining
to the necessary things to be learned
and known for the first real tryout
which occurs 10 days later. The Com-
edy club does not requ ire any previous
experience in dramatics, and it desires
anyone who is interested to come out
for the first tryout. The meeting next
Thursday will be held in the Cercle
Francais rooms.
FRESH VICTOIlOU S.
INOPENI'NG. CAME.

MICHIGAN SECOND
IN PENN RELAY RACE
Cornell Easily Wis From Field by
Finishing 80 Yards Ahead
of Maize and Blue
1 Runners
DEE IV, COLORED SPRINTER, WINS
FROM CAPTIN SMITH IN DASH
Bo Wilson Ties with 13 Others for
Second in Pole Vault; Cross
Fourth in Discus
(Free Press News Service)
PHILADELPHIA, April 24-Cornell
won the four-mile relay at the Penn-
sylvania relay races here on Franklin
field today, with Michigan second and
Wisconsin third. The time was 18:07
3-5.
Howard Drew, of California, won the
100-yard dash with Smith, of Michi-
gan, second and Knight, of Chicago,
third. Wilson, of Michigan, tied for
second with 13 others in the pole
vault. Foss, of Cornell, and Sewell, of
Pennsylvania, tied for first at 12 feet
10 inches. In the discus, Cross, the
Wolverine representative; finished
fourth.
In the four-mile relay race, Cornell
literally ran away with the field, fin-
ishing 80 yards ahead of the Maize and
Blue. Michigan and Wisconsin hook-
ed up in a pretty dual for second hon-
ors, the Badgers losing out on the fin-
al lap, when "Eddie" Carroll, the sen-
sational western miler, nosed out Har-
vey, the Wisconsin star, after' a won-
derful race. Carroll started behind
larvey but passed him and put his
team in second place. The time was
much slower than had been expected,
as Cornell, Michigan and Wisconsin
have all run the distance in faster
timo than the mark hung up this af-
ternoon.
Princeton's two-mile relay team
broke the intercollegiate record, hang,-
ing up a new mark of 7:55 3-5. Chica-
go was second and Yale third. Prince-
ton's two mile team has cleaned up
everything they have been up against,
and were favorites today.
Pennsylvania won the one-mile re-
lay with Ilarvard second and Wiscon-
sin third.

score,
take

MEET TUESDAY ON
SENIOR MEMORIAL
'15 Lits Consider Important Question;
Propose.10 Year Pledges to
Aid Freshmen

died in an
e next men
ball. mak-

Win from State Normal College
Close Score in Five
.Inning Contest

by

DISCUSSION UAP TWICE BEFORE

ial-

aries fol-

6.)

er Must Be
at

it questions will
student council at
lay which will be
k in the north wing'
ection Day matter
ttled by the student
councilmen have
ttled on the meth-

One of the most important things
for the senior lits to decide at their.
class meeting which is scheduled for
4:00 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in
room 205 Tappan hall, is the memorial
question.
This has been the subject of discus-
sion at the last two class meetings
which were held before vacation.
At present, the general sentiment of
the senior lits seems. to favor a schol-
arship loan fund, for juniors and sen-
iors. Another plan suggested is to
have a committee take pledges to be
paid at some future time, as 10 years,
after the manner of the Harvard class
memorials, and use the income of the
fund for the benefit of icoming fresh-
men.
A permanent alumni committee will
be elected at the meeting. Class dues
and also money for invitations, which
have not been paid for, will be collect-
ed.
The tentative date of the "Swing-
Out" is set as May 11, and it is likely
that no change will be made in it.
ARE YOU GOING TO SOPH PROM?
Pasteboards Go on Sale to General
Public Tomorrow.
Tickets for the Soph Prom which
takes place on May 7 are going rapid-
ly, and all sophomores who are plan-
ning to go, and who have not yet ob-
tained their tickets, are urged to do
so at the first opportunity, as the tick-'
ets will go on sale tomorrow morning
to the general public.
The committee on decorations have
decided on red and white as the colors
for the decorations. Finzel's J-Hop
orchestra has been secured, and the
programs of embossed leather in the
mission color will be used. The dance
will be informal.

"Boys will be boys" and the orig-
inator of this bit of phraseology would
have ,been justified and well within
the bounds of propriety if he added,
"and a whole lot of other things."
At yesterday's ball game the reports
which were read from the Pennsylva-
nia relay races were most interesting
and would have been most pleasing-
if true. And this they weren't.
There chanced to be no wire to the
field yesterday, nor any pre-arranged
system of communication with Frank-
lin field, but minor obstacles such as
these can not check or even impede
real genius, or better, perhaps, 'prom-
ising candidates for the Ananias Clu-
- - - well, you know.
The reports about the weather were
accepted verbatim but the next couple
were out of question. "Cornell an 8 to
3 favorite" read the second report and
Michigan track followers believed Cor-
nellians were fired with more enthu-

Campus Wits Invade Ye Press Stand
And Fake Reports From Penn Relays

siasm and exuberance than discretion.
However, this passed.
Then came, "although starting in
ninth postion, Donnelly handed the
baton to Fox a scant yard behind Spei-
den of Cornell." Some running! Some
running. The truth of the matter was,
the race didn't start until about an
hour after the report was read. With
due "credit to "Red" Donnelly, about
the only way to catch Speiden, after
starting in ninth position in a mile
race, would be to charter an automo-
bile or to hop on a 42' centimeter shell
and trop off when Speiden was reach-
ed.
The report emancipated from the
press box, and to clear itself the Daily
herewith emphatically disclaims any
connection with the "joke." However,
there were "visitors" in the press box,
and well, one of the aforementioned
"visitors" is connected with another
Michigan publication.

1918 SQUAD SHOWS GOOit FORM
Michigan State Normal College was
no match for the All-Fresh nine yes-
terday afternoon and as a result lost
the encounter by a 3 to 3 score. The
freshmen throughout the battle show-
ed themselves the betteTr team and
should the game have lasted longer,'
the freshmen would have found little
difficulty in piling up a big score.
Walterhouse played a good game at
short, showing himself to be a sure
fielder. Lambert at catch showed
real form while Andrus pitched a
steady game, allowing only five hits
and keeping them pretty well scat-
tered.
Torrey hurled a good game f.r the
State College aggregation allowing but
five hits while Kishigo p rformed well
at the backstop position. ,coth teams
fielded well, each nine only rece:ving
one error.
The lineups and score follow:
(Continued on page 6.)
LEON FRASER WILL SPEAK TO
JOINT INTE.{NA TIONAL CIXLBS
Subject to Be '"Orga:iized Insanity or
Military Training for
college Men"
Leon Fraser, instructor of political
science at Columbia, will address the
Cosmopolitan and International Poli-
ty clubs on "Organized Insanity or Mil-
itary Training for College Men," at
4:00 o'clock this afternoon in Harris
hall.
Mr. Fraser is a. Carnegie endow-
mient lecturer, a former newspaper
man, and lawyer., He was in Berlin
when the war wvrs declared, and since.
that time has visited four of the bel-
ligerant nations. -His address tc'ay
will conclude a 10-days flying th to
the principal universities of the-m d e
west.

REPORT SAYS CHENOT RALLIES
ANI) IS NOW HOLDING HIS 0W
Nay have Second Operation on Hea
in Effort to Sew Up Leaking
Organ
Following a slight improvement i
condition yesterday morning, Jame
Chenot, '16, of Detroit, confined i
Grace hospital in that city, has rallies
At 2:15 o'clock this morning, hospit,
authorities said that he was holdin
his own, but that it was not know
whether a second operation would I
performed upon the patient's heart i
an effort to sew up the leaking orga
Reports received from Detroit ye
terday seemed to indicate that such a
operation would be possible with th
means of artificial assistance to circi
lation, provided that the weight of c(
agulated blood in the pericardium so
aild around the tissues surroundin
the heart did not impede its actio
Dr. R. K. Johnson, of Detroit, the p,
tient's physician, could not be reach<
last night to confirm the possibility
such an operation.

tall come under the plan
I each meeting the mat-
-eferred back to the com-
Late which has been plan-
e general election is May
rder that sufficient time
allowed to carry out the
icil will have to make a
lion on Tuesday night,
H. M. Lacy, '15, president
1.
fleld will not be available
t this year, owing to the
on it which are now
a new location for this
secui'ed at an early date.
)mmittees will report,
is that which has had
lecting the indemnity al-
sel G. Jacobs, ex-'18, the
: was injured by hazing
the year,

FIRST PR.ES BYTERIAN CHURCH
DIVISION AND HURON STS.
Don't forget
Dr. McCaudless' Address
at 10:30 A. M.

Public C41.Get Seats for Cercle P1
Student seat sale for the Cerc
Francais play, "La Poudre aux Yeu
closed yesterday. The pasteboar
will go on sale to the general pub
from 8:00 to 10:00 o'clock and frc
2:00 to 5:00.o'clock tomorrow
Wahr's bookstore. Students holdir
associate membership tickets in t
Cercle may exchange them at thI
time for 50 cent seats at the produ
tion.

Young Men's Class, 12 Noon

ALL INVITED

v
r

The

Raymond Robins and Paul Blanshard 14.

Religious
the year

A Rare Combination
Robins is one of the
greatest speakers to stu-
dents in the country.
Blanshard is one of
the best student speakers
in the country.

At Ait Auditorium 7:30 Tonight

- "

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