100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 24, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DAILY
MORNING A
$1.00 LOCAL

_i '

C

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIJ
N 00w

o. 144.

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 24. 1915.

PRICE FIVE CJ

r r

[ERN RESERVE
ERS IN SEASON
cal Baseball Year by Oppos-
ech Lundgren's Varsity
Aggregation on
Ferry Field
sit FURNISH CURTAIN.
ER WITH YPSI CON'TEST

TODAY
Membership dance at Union, 9:00
o'clock.
Baseball-Michigan vs. Western Re-
serve, Ferry field, 2:30 o'clock.
Baseball-All-Fresh vs. Ypsilanti, Fer-
ry field, 1:15 o'clock.
Ernest Moore speaks on "The Truth
about Socialism," Unitairan church,
7:45 o'clock.
Special meeting Cercle Francais, Cer-
cle room, 5:00 o'clock.

STAR PERFORMERS
ACT AS MINSTRELS
t'.>> pUS Comedians and Specialty Men
Will Contribute to Boat
Club Production
Friday
BLIC FAC ;E MEN, STUNTS AND
PLAYLET FEATURE PROGRAM

ROBINS WLL SPEAK
AT S.g.CA.MEETING
So'cial Worker Will Address Annual
Meeting of Students' Christian
A ssociation Tomorrow
Night
"ChRISTIAN STATESMANSHIP"
WILL BE SUBJECT OF TALHK

* * * * '* * * * * * * * *

:
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
:f
*:

S-cores of Former Yars

:

Yea
1910
1911
1911
1912
1913
1914

-0-
S0
6
0
2
11
9
1.

4 ..
1
2
0
3
0

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

FIELD OF STA RS
PENN RELAY RAG
Captain Smith to Run against Ho
Drew, Jones, Patterson,
Hardy and Other
Lightning Men
CORNELL'S FOUR-MILE QUART
LOOMS UP AS SLIGHT FAVOI
Reports Indicate Cross of 'ieli
Should Figure Heavily
in Discus *

Totals ...25
-0-

10

ty RomYps Over Reserves
' Practice Game
Yesterday

Inl

Allan Ricketts Planning Device to
Canoes Over Barton
Power Dam

Lift Present

Conclave to Be Fifty-Seventh
Yearly Gathering of
Organization

Games played ....
Michigan.. ............
Western Reserve
* * * * * * * * * *

7
5
2
*

*
*
*
*
*
*

Michigai
Sheehy,
Labadie,
McQueei
Sisler, I
Benton,
Brandel
Maltby,
Waltz,
Davidsoi
McNama
All-Fres
Norma

'I *1 * * * * * * *
n MWestern Reserve *
cf .......Langell, rf *
rf .... McNaughton, 2b *
n, 2b (C) .Oldenburg, ss *
If ...... Barrett, c (C) *
c......Schweigert, if *
, ss .......Carlson, 3b *
lb........ Schuele, lb *
3b ......... ....W olf, cf *
n, Nichols or *
ra, p . .Boone, Patton *
or Coen, p *
h vs. Michigan State *
1 College at 1:'15 *
a vs. Western Reserve *
O o'clock. *
varsity diamond at Fer- *
d.*
-Dr.J.A. Kimzey (Yale) *
roit. *
wil see both of her ball

Black face men, together with a skit
written by Harold Schradzki, '15L, and'

T-OMORROW
Hon. Raymonld Robins speaks on
"Christian Statesmanship" in Hill
auditorium, 7:30 o'clock.
To Examine Fresh Gym Classes Again
With the close of freshman gym
classes, the first year men are suppos-
ed to take a second examination which,
with the chart made at this time,
shows the amount of improvement
made by the man in his physical con-
dition during the time he has been
taking the work, and since these ex-
aminations have not been taken by
the majority of freshmen, Doctor May
has arranged to see freshmen in the
gym to schedule their time of exami-
nation.
INCREASETO $107
Missionary Calverley Tells of Needs
in Far East at Campaign
Dinner
BLANSHARD,'14, SPEAKS TONIGHT

st home games of the
Vestern Reserve will
season for 1915 on
eting the Wolverines
The curtain-raiser to
11 be the All-Fresh-
which was shifted
Ann Arbor. The
e Michigan fans their
ball on the local dia-
start at 1:15 o'clock,
Iraw they will retire
favor of Coach Lund-
eir initial home per-

Western Reserve comes here in -the
.sguise of an unknown quantity, but
dging from all previous showings
the Clevelanders, the Wolverines
Ill have no easy time in asserting
ieir supremacy over her opponents.
ast year's game was saved to Michi-
an only by the excellent pitching of
Doc" Baribeau who held the Reserve
am to a shut-out, while errors by the
sitors allowed Michigan three runs.
he team from Cleveland has the
ing of thiree consecutive defeats in
a many years to wipe out, and odds
'e in favor of their giving the home
am a good race for its money.
(Continued on page 4.)
EARLINGS PLAY FIRST ROUND
O)F ALL-FRESH TENNIS MATCHES
Contestants for the All-Fresh ten-
s team finished fourteen matches on
.e Ferry field courts yesterday after-
Don. However there are sixteen
atches to be played before tonight.
he time has been extended until this
rening because of the rainy weather
i Thursday which held up the play.
1 matches not played by the speci-
Gd time will be defaulted. Results
imild be posted on the schedule
>ard at the Ferry field club house.
The results of yesterday's matches
'e as follows: Kirkpatrick beat Al-
n, 8-6, 8-10, 6-3; Reindel beat
cDavid, 8--6, 6-;Coons beat Wood-
Ard, 6-2, 6--2; Britton beat Guettel,
-6, 6-3, 6-1; Burton beat Orr,-
--1, 6-2; Sherwood beat Everts,
-a, 7-5; Hogan beat Lilley, 6-3,
-6, 6-1; Stocking beat Wakefield,
-0, 6--1; Doty beat Henkel, 6-0,
-0; Underwood beat Coit, 6-3, 6-3;
pstean beat Palma, 6-4, 6-3; Brier
at Patterson, 6-1, 6-2; Wehmeyer
at Atlas, 6-2, 8-6; McDonald beat
alter, 6-0, 6-3 l
The second round will be started on

With 225 men and Nvomen working
in the Busrah campaign, the sum of
$1,075 was reported as being raised
at the third of the campaign dinners
held at the Methodist church parlors
last night. This sum is only a partial
report of the amount already sub-
scribed toward the goal of $3,700,
nearly a hundred of the committee-
men finding it impossible to be pres-
ent at last night's gathering,-,
E. E. Calverley, a missionary who
is stationed just 100 miles from Bus-
rah and who has but recently return-
ed from his Post, spoke of the great
need for hospitals and physicians'
throughout the entire Persian valley
section, and he drew some vivid word
pictures of the privations being suf-
fered by Dr. Van Vlack and the other
Arabian missionaries, these privations
generally being without reward and
accepted ,thanklessly by the people
whom they sought to help.
Grace Fletcher, '16, and E. C. Boyn-
ton, associate minister of the Congre-
gational church also delivered short
speeches and Frank Olmstead gave
some directions for the actual can-
vassing wark.
At the meeting tonight, Paul B.
Blanshard, '14, and Werner Sehroe-
der,. '16L, president of the S. C. A.
will speak, and according to General
Chairman Paul V. Ramsdell, '16, the
dollar ought to be somewhere in
Switzerland when all of tonight's re-
ports are in.
The campaign will end tomorrow.
afternoon, and all final reports of pro-
gress will be made at a meeting of
the entire committee to be held at 4:30'
o'clock tomorrow afternoon at New-
berry hall.
Rowe Issues Call for Class 't'rack Men
Intramural Director Rowe will is-
sue a call for class track aspirants
during the early part of next week.
A meet between the different classes
has been arranged for in the spring.

some new specialty stunts will be in-
cluded in the Boat club minstrel show
Friday night, April 30, in Hill audito-
rium. H. L. Nutting, '15L, Leroy Scan-
Ion, '16L, Thomas Doyle, '15L, George
P. MeMahon, '16, Otto Wismer, '15L,
and K enneth Westerman, g rad., are
among those who will appear on the
program. Rehearsing for the enter-,
tainment is now under way and will
be continued practically every day un-
til the staging of the performance.
Louis K. Friedman, '15, is chairman
in charge of the minstrel show proper,
and D. R. Baflentine, '16, is assisting
him. E. .Rodgers, Sylvester, '17, Wa!-
aemar A. John, '16, and Verne E. Bur-
nett, '17, will handle the publicity,,
.while Staats Abrams, '17, heads a
large number of ticket sellers. The
performance will open at 8:00 o'clock
and will close in time for the Cotton
Ball to be held at the Union. ,Paste-
boards will sell at 25 cents each and
proceeds will be used to a large extent
to. finance the annual Boat club re-
gatta, May 29.
Returns from the membership cam-
Laign which closed- last night are be-
ing compiled and will soon be pub-
lished. Funds from the canvass will
be use.d largely to pay for lumber for
the proposed boathouse to be erected
by students for the housing of racing
shells. Allan Ricketts, '15E, a former
officer of the club, after having made
a careful study of the dam, has begun,
plans for a lift, to carry canoes across
the Barton dam. His "work will be
submitted to engineering college au-
thorities, and the Edison company is
then expected to cooperate with the
aquatic club in having the improve-
ment put in before the regatta.
MICHIGANENSIAN ON SALE MAY 51
Issued 14 Days Earlier Than Last Year
at-Increased Expenditure
Printing of the Michiganensian was
completed in Grand Rapids last week
and it is now being bound in Chicago.
It will arrive here next week and be
put on sale May 5, which is 14 days
earlier than the publication of last
year's book.
The cost of this issue is $7,000, a
$2,000 increase over the amount ex-
Rended by last year's seniors. The
sale price of the annual will be $2.50,
notwithstanding the fact that the1
printing and engraving of each bookI
totals $4.30.,
More space has been allotted to cam-
pus activities in this edition than in,
any former one, pictures of every foot-
ball game played last year and snaps
of the underclassmen's contests be-_
ing the especial additions.

Raymond Robins of Chicago has
been secured as the speaker for the
fifty-seventh annual meeting of the
Students' Christian association to be
held tomorrow night at 7:30 o'clock
in Hill auditorium. A special musical
service is now in process of prepara-
tion, and in addition to the speaker,
of the evening, Paul B. Blanshard, '14,
who has been in Boston since his
graduation will deliver a short ad-
dress.
While the Busrah canvass techni-
cally comes to an end tonight when
the reports of the committees are in,
an effort will be made at the meeting
in Hill auditorium tomorrow night to
raise any portion of the $3,700 which
has not been subscribed or paid in by
the students on the campus.
Raymond Robins, who will take as
the subject of his address tomorrow
night, "Christian Statesmantship," was
the progressive party nominee for
United States senator from Illinois in
the election held last fall. He has be-
come famous throughout the country
as a settlement and social service
worker, and during the past several
months he has sperst considerable
time in heading up social service cam-
paigns in some of the largest universi-
ties and cities of the country.
In an editorial that appeared in a
Louisville paper a few weeks ago, the
following is said of a three days' cam-
paign which he held in that city. "We
have learned enough and absorbed
enough of Mr. Robins fire and enthu-
siasmn to carry us forward for several
months. If he could only, spend a few
months awakening the public con-
science of Louisville, and pointing out
the sure way to success in 'the fight
against gang oppression,. and political
graft, we too might see some of our
deserving offenders wearing the strip-
es, just as others are now doing as a
result of Mr. Robin's work in Illinois."
Hillsdale Students Organize Monday
J. W. Mauck, president of Hillsdale
college will speak to the organization
banquet of the new Hillsdale club at
5:30 o'clock Monday. Other members .
of the college faculty are also booked
to give short talks. The members will
elect their first officers and draw up
a constitution. ,All former Hillsdale
students are invited to join the club at
the initial meeting.
Dixie Club Holds Banquet Tonight
Dixie club members will meet for
their second annual banquet at 7:00
o'clock tonight, at the Hotel Statler,
in Detroit. W. G. Goodwin, '16L, will
act as toastmaster, and Dr. M. B. Gar-
rett, of the history department, will be
the faculty speaker. F. W. Wood, '16i
will represent the club members.

ENTlRi

MEMBERS OF AlIT ASSO( 'ATtON
AND STUI)ENTS G( TO l)ETROIT
Nearly 300 university students and
members of the Ann Arbor Art asso-
ciation will form an art pilgrimage to
the Detroit Museum of Art this morn-
ing to view two displays of paintings
and stagecraft now on view there. The
trip will be managed by Librarian
Theodore W. Koch, and will return to
Ann Arbor this evening.
The exhibition of paintings is said
to be o'ne of the best in America, while
the stagecraft display is novel, and
has been attracting considerable at-
tention. The latter ex'hibit is made in
miniature, and shows settings of some
of the most artistic plays and operas
which have been produced in recent
year~s.
HOUSE PASSES BILL
TO BETTER [IBRARYI
Appropriation of $30,000 to Ile Spread
, Over Two Years; Plans Not
Conpleted

-'With the appropriation bill of Rep-
.resentative Sutton, calling for $350,000
for the university library, pass-'
ed by the house of representatives
by a vote of 79 to 10, and with the
practical certainty that the bill will
also be passed by the state senate
next week, the much needed improve-
-ments to the university library are
thought tobe assured.
The amount named in the bill is
that which was requested in January
by the Michigan regents, who after in-
vestigating the whole library problem,
issued a bulletin of information to the
legislature setting forth the necessity
Sincreased library facilities.
While no plans have been drawn up.
as yet for the remodelling of the pres-
ent .building, it is said that this work
will receive the attention of the re-
gents at their next meeting, unless the
bill meets with some difficulties in the
upper house. The bill spreads'the ap-
propriation over two years, providing
for $175,000 each year.
Owing to the fact that the library
will be constantly in usep it is antici-
pated that the work of building the
additions will be done gradually. Ac-
cording to a tentative plan which has
been proposed, the whole front of the
building will be changed, by altering
the rotunda and building an additional
stack room parallel with the present
one.. The building will be made fire-
proof throughout, and . the general
reading room will probably be up-
stairs.
The present general library was
built at a cost of $100,000, and
owing to the limited amount available
it was impossible to make the entire
building fire-proof.
During the last 11 years, the numn-
ber of volumes in the general library
has doubled in number, and they could
not be .replaced for more than a mil-
lion dollars, while the inventoried val-
ue is placed about three-quarters of
a million.

BUILDING FIRE-PROOF

PIIILADELPHIA, Arril 23.-
athletes from all over America g
ered for the Pennsylvania relay ra
one of the fastest track meets of
season begins here today.
Nearly every event has brought fc
a field of stars, and the managem
looks for sensational, records. In
100-yard dash, the pick of the coup
will meet, and any sprinter who
class enough to fight his way down
the finals, will find himself up aai
the greatest dash men in the la
Prominent among these is Howl
Drew, the colored champion from C
ifornia who holds the record of 9
equalling the world's mark. Last y
Drew won, easily. Jones of Geor
town, who finished- second last yea
also on hand, and will run tonorr
Seward of Miehigan, who finished th
last season,. is missing, but Sewar
former teammate, Smith of the W
verine squad is entered, Smith pla
in both dashes in the intercollegi
last season ands should give a good
count of himself. ;Patterson of Pem
sylvania, intercollegiate champion t
years ago, and who ran 9 4-5 wb
he won the title is also entered; Bi
anick of Chicago, who won the 1
yard dash'in the Western Conferex
last season is also entered. Knig
another speed merchant from the W
dy City is also here.- Hardy, of.No
Dame, who -won the 50-yard dash
the indoor A. A. U. in Chicago is a.
heregas is Treadway of Yale who b
been running in sensational form.
Cornell's four mile team, which
be composed of Speiden,1 Hoffini
Potter and Windagle, is on hand a
is a slight favorite for theNur-
event, although Michigan and WisC
sin both loom' up as dark horses ju<
ing from the sensational grace at 1
Drake Relays.-
In the pole vault, Foss of Cr
has entered, and is figured to plaD
prominent part in the scoring. Wils
of Michigan, Curtis of Syracuse a
one of Missouri's vaulters, are also
pected to figure, while Camp of Ha
ard has been showing nice form
cently.
- Cross .of Michigan" stands fo
prominently in the discus, as t
youth is reported to have thrown f
ther than 128 feet which won the ev
last year. However several east
cracks have been hanging up lik
marks in this event, and last seasc
record seems sure to be shattered.
COLUMBIA INSTRUCTOR WILL
T ALK ON MILITART QU(ESTI
Leon Fraser Will Bring up Snj
of Training at Polity
club Meeting
Leon Fraser, a member of the pc
ical science staff of Columbia uni
sity, will' speak to the Cosmopoli
club and International Polity club
Harris hall at 4:00 o'clock tomorr
afternoon.
The subject of Mr. Fraser's addr
will be "Organized insanity or M
tary Training for College Men." I
meeting is open' to all students of .
university and in view of the fact t
military training is one of the nati
al subjects now being widely discu
ed there should be a large attendam
at the lecture.

Yost Makes Practice Go Smoothly;
Weather Makes It Go Perspiringly
___- ---

Coach Yost supervised the workout
of approximately 40 football candi-
dates yesterday afternoon, the practice
consisting prinipally of routine work.
Weather conditions suggested al-
most anything but football. However,
the presence.of the mentor supplied
the needed inspiration, and things
went off smoothly, although a purely
impartial observer might have more
accurately described it as "per-
spiringly." Captain Bill Cochran was

on hand, cavorting about the field with,
the others, and. he must have lost sev-
eral pounds during the course of the
afternoon's activities. However, Wil-
liam isn't of such delicate and modest
proportions that the loss of a dozen in-
significant pounds is perceptible toothe
casual observer.
The squad spent the bigger part of
the afternoon kicking and passing,
with some attention devoted to block-
ing and tackling.

e

hif

n

a

I

GET

A RECEIPT

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan