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April 23, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-23

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ie

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE
$1.00

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 1915.

PRICE F.

'I

A

TODAY
Engineering society dance at Gran-
ger's, 9:00 o'clock.

REGENTS INGREASE
tO-ESIDENT FE
Raise Tax From $10 to $23; Begins in
Fall of 1916; to Start in Dental
College Next Semester

40 MEN REPORT TO
YOST ATPRACTICE
List Comprises members of Varsity
Squad Last Year; Bastian
Gets Out

7 to 4 with
Pitted

Law faculty luncheon at Union, 12:00
o'clock. IISCUSS PLANS FOR NEXT YEAR

I ND LGE

TN TACKLING , DRILL

stern Re-
oon start-

Hobart Guild party at Harris hall,
8:00 o'clock.
Honorable Stephen Panaretoff, Bulga-
rian ambassador to the United Stat-
es, speaks on, "The Development of
the Bulgarian Language" in the west
gallery of Alumni Memorial hall,
4:15 o'clock.
Junior Engineer Assembly in Room
348 at 9:00 o'clock.

Michigan's board of regents raised'
the non-resident fees for students in
all schools and colleges in the univer-
sity from $10 to $25, at their regular
April meeting, held yesterday. The
increase will go - into effect in the
dental college next fall, and will take
effect in the other schools and colleg-
es in the fall of 1916. When the new,
ruling becomes effective, all students

tne

y's Student ticket sale for Cercle Francais
th- Play, 8:00 to 10:00 o'clock and 2:00
ng to 5:00 o'clock, Wahr's bookstore.

I the pitch-
d were op-
Soddy who
r the first
team was
's delivery
while the

Joseph Lindon Smith lectures in Alum-
ni Memorial hall, 8:00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Membership dance at Union, 9:00
o'clock.
baseball-Michigan vs Western Re-
serve, Ferry field, 2:30 o'clock.
Baseball-All-Fresh vs. Ypsilanti, Fer-
ry field, 1:15 o'clock.

hree
x of Junior Engineers Hold Assembly Today
rge- Junior engineers will hold their as-
sembly at 9:00 o'clock this morning.
ade, Prof. T. C. Trueblood will speak to the
on members of the class and the new
lout ules governing the mentor system will
off probably be briefly explained. Inmie-
Tle diately after the assembly junior civil
Sis- engineers will meet to discuss plans
ng- for their camp.

registering from other states will be
forced to pay $25 more than is assess-
ed Michigan students.
The board spent the greater part of
their time at yesterday's meeting in
discussion of plans for next year, no
definite action being possible at this
time, since the amount of money which
will be available is not yet known. The
budget committee met immediately af-
ter the close of yesterday's session,
and definite plans for the coming year
will probably be taken up at the next
meeting, to be held May 21.
The buildings and grounds com-
mittee was authorized to take bids for
the proposed enlargement of Water-
man gymnasium, and expects to pre-
sent these at the May meeting of the
board.
But one degree was granted at yes-
terday's meeting, this being a B. I). S.,
and going to Miss Hertha C. Hartwig,
dent spec., of Detroit.
The regents also authorized . the
publication of the third edition of the
booklet entitled "Michigan Trees,"
which contains descriptions and illus-
trations of all trees found in the state.
The installation of a sewer system
at the summer engineering camp was
provided for. The board also author-
ized the building of a new kitchen at
the camp.
STUDENTS DISPLAY INTEREST
IN SU IIER AILITARY CAMPS

.j
About 40 candidates for the 1915
Varsity reported to Coach Yost for
spring practice yesterday. This al-
most doubles the number who were out
on Wednesday, the first day of organ-
ized training.
Several of last year's Varsity squad
men put in an appearance, among
them being Whalen, Calvin and Roehm.
Bastian, who won his 'M,' appeared for
the latter half of the drill. The major-
ity of the newcomers were members of
the All-Fresh squad, or were strangers
to the gridiron game at Michigan.
The coach started the practice with
punting and the receiving of kicks.
Inasmuch as it is yet early in the sea-
son, he did not pay much attention to
any individuals, but contented himself
with looking over the entire squad,
with the hope that several real punters
might be uncovered. He then divided
the men into squads for passing and
running with the ball from several-
formations.
Without giving the candidates much
of a rest, he instituted a session of
falling on the ball, blocking and for a
finale, taught the men-how to tackle.
The tackling drill was rather strenu-
ous for so early in the year, but the
players stood it well.
"Germany" Schulz' -arrival is still a
matter of doubt. The coach does not
know whether his assistant w ill show
up, but it would not surprise him to
.ee the big boy drop into towjn at al-
most any time.
Among the men to report yesterday
was Lambert, at present catcher on
the All- Fresh baseball team, who will
be a prominent candidate for the cen-
ter position vacated by "Jimmy"
Raynsford. He was all-state center
of West Virginia for two years. The

* *
West
April
show
May 1-
Case
May 1-
May 1-
State
May 1-
May 6-
Syra
May 7-
May 7-
May 8-
Syrac
May 11
May 12
M. A.
May 14
May 15
Corn
May 15-
Syrac
May 15
May 19
May 20
May 21
May 21-
May 22
-May 22-
May 22
May 22-
-Unive
May 28-
May 28
May 29-
May 29-
Polish
June 4-
Notre
June 4-
June 5-
Notre
June 7-
June 22
Penms
June 22
June 23
Penns
June 23
Note-
are sub
* *

ma* Norma *
A-Baseball, Michigan vs.*
ern Reserve. k
;8--Baseball, Michig'an vs.*
mazoo Norinal.*
30-Boat club minstrel *
r. 4*
-Baseball, Michigan vs. *
Scientific School. *
-Band concert. *
-Baseball, All-Fresh vs. *
Normal College. *
-Track, Varsity meet. *
-Baseball, Michigan vs. *
cuse. *
-Soph Prom. *
-Band concert. *
-Baseball, Michigan vs. *
cuse. *
-Swing Out (tentative'. *
--Baseball, Michigan vs. *
C. *
-Band concert. *
-Baseball, Michigan vs. *
ell. .
-Track, Michigan vs. *
use.*
-Straw Hat Day. *
-May Festivl.
--May Festival. *
-Spring games. *
-Interscholastic meet. *
-May Festival. *
-Interscholastic meet. *
-Spring games. *
-Baseball, All-Fresh vs. *
rsity of Detroit. *
-Regatta.
-Cap Night. *
-Regatta. ' *
-Baseball,. All-Fresh vs. *
h Seminary. *
-Baseball, Michigan vs. *
Dame. *
-Band concert. *
-Baseball, Michigan vs. *
tDame. *
-Examinations start. *
-Baseball, Michigan vs. *
ylvania. *
-Senior Prom. *
-Baseball, Michigan vs. *
sylvania. *
-Band concert. *
-Any of the above dates *
ject to revision. *
* * Is* * *

BUSRAH CAIPA
FUND TOTA.S!
Reports of Captains Show 22
Registered for Canvassi
Moerdyk Tells of
Conditions
UBSCRIPTIONS MOVE S
DOLLAR AS FAR AS NEN
Will Hold Another Dinner Toi
Which Special Speakers i
Be Secured
With reports of $566.55 as i
of the subscriptions for the f
meeting of the Busrah commi
second dinner of the campa
held last night at the Methodis
parlors. The reports made by
ious captains showed that 225:
women have been registered
take part in the actual cai
work.
J. E. Moerdyk, who has but
returned from Arabia and the
surrounding the Busrah mis,
hospital spoke briefly of exist
ditions at that place, and he a
some interesting personal obse
on the difficulties which are c
ing Dr. Van Vlack and Mis
hauser, two of the Michigan n<
tatives who are at present in
east.
Short talks were also made
dah Bancroft, '15, and W. C.
dore, '16L, retiring executives
Y. W. C. A. and the Y. M. C. A.
tively, and their remarks wer,
nature of generating "pep"
committee men just previous
going out on the canvass las
P. V. Ramsdell, '16, genera
man of the campaign, said in f
the sum Which has already bE
scribed will move the standai
ing the silver dollar on the i
some of the State street stores,
York city, but that care will
be takefi so that tonight when
ports are all in, the dollar wil
suspended somewhere out in I
die of the Atlantic.
At the dinner which will be
night, further reports of progr
be made, and the committee is
a special effort to secure specia
ers.

awed Student Councilmen Meet on Tuesday
bat- Student councilmen will hold their
the next meeting on Tuesday night. Ac-
he cording to H. M. Lacy, '15, president
tgle, of the council, the Campus Election
ton Day problem will be definitely settled
no at the next session. The site on which
and to stage the Cap Night exercises this
ird, year will also be chosen at that time.
fith
d to
Fan- OURmMILE
afe-
DRA 00WS 12. ENTRIES'
the . .
7 as
and Relay Race at Philadelphia in Which'
the Wolverines Have Entered,

*
*
*
*
* C
*
*

coach picked him out immediately and
put him to work passing the fall to
the backs. This does not indicate
anything at this stage o the game, but
Lambert may develop into a crack at
the center position.

LUIIU-
Arbor,
y, and
rge of

Attractive

ig in the open
ching arm, and
atting practice.
r is .rounding
the fact that
ual amount of
>e seen on the
erines open on
summaries of

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CORNELL TEAM TO BE FAVORITE
PHILADELPHIA, April 22-One of
the features of the Pennsylvania re-
lay races next Saturday, promises to
be the four-mile event which has at-
tracted 12 entries, the biggest number
of any of the relay contests.
Prominent among the contenders
are Cornell, Wisconsin, Michigan and,
Pennsylvania. Wisconsin's sensa-
tional victory over the Wolverines
last week at Des Moines, when the
Drake record was smashed by no less
than 32 seconds, indicates that the
time will be right around the world's
mark. Michigan finished a scant seven
feet behind the Badgers, and Cornell
and Pennsylvania, two of the fastest
eastern opponents, may have to step
under 18 minutes, according to all
indications, if they succeed in win-
ning.
A Cornell relay team is the only
college aggregation in America that
has ever run faster than the mark set
up by Wisconsin last Saturday, even
the famous Oxford quartet's time be-
ing lowered by a fraction of a second.
Cornell this year looks especially for-
midable on paper, as some of the
fastest collegiate milers in America
are running for the Ithacans. Spei-.
den, the intercollegiate champion will
be on hand and will probably run the
final lap for Cornell.
The four-mile relay race is the last
event on the program, and should

Prof. L. M. Gram, of the engineer-
ing college,- who has been placed in
charge of the local application office
for the student summer camps of the
War Department, has received a num-
ber of inquiries from students in re-
gard to the camp. He is now gather-
ing opinions from students who have
attended the camps in former years,
and will place the information on file,
where it may be seen by students in-
terested in the military camps.
Circulars concerning the work in
the encampments are expected from
the headquarters of the movement
within a few days, and will be distrib-
uted free.. Information and applica-
tion blanks may be secured from Pro-
fessor Gram, room 322, new engineer-
ing building.,
MAY STAGE GOLF TOURNAMENT
ON COURSE OF COUNTRY CLUB
Play in the annual university golf
tournament may be staged this spring1
on the course of the Washtenaw Coun-
try club, according to an announce-
ment made yesterday afternoon by
officers of the University of Michi-
gan Golf club. A favorable propo-
sition for the use of the Country
Club links by the student organiza-
tion has been made by the club, and
this proposal is to be acted on at a
meeting 'of golf enthusiasts, called
for Monday evening at the Michigan
Union.
prove one of the cards of the after-
noon. Cornell will perhaps start as
a slight favorite, but the showing of
the two western, institutions at Des-
Moines, has caused the easterners to
"stop, look and listen."

TO TRY-OUT "LAUGHING

Doctor Peterson Expresses Himself
in Faivor of Method
Dr. Reuben 'Peterson, of the univer-
sity hospital, who spent last summer
in the Freiburg maternity hospital
studying the "Twilight sleep," which
has aroused so much intere t during
the last few months, has Expressed
himself as being greatly intorested in
the use of nitrous acid gas to lessen
the pain of childbirth. It is now
planned to try out the latter method-
in the university hospital. Dr. J. Clar-
ence Webster, .of Chicago, is an advo-
cate of the nitrous acid, or :as it is
generally called, laughing gas .method,
and has had remarkable snccest; in his
use of it.
Doctor Peterson has used the "Twi-
light sleep" method in more than 60
cases here, and has never had any bad
results. However, he feels that the
Webster method is the better of the
two and it will be instituted in the
maternity ward of the university bios-
pital in the near future.
DEAN EFFINCER TO RE1RESENT'
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO, N. N.
Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary college, will represent-the univer-
sity at the annual meeting and banquet
of the University of Michigan. Alumni
association of Buffalo, N. Y., at that
place tonight. The dean will also pre-a
sent a silver cup this, after'noon to
students of the Nichols schoot in. Buf- I
falo. He spoke yesterday afternoon
to students of the high school at Dun-
kirk, N. Y. .

GAS"

MAY ALTER AWARD
OF ICLASSINSIGNIA
Athletic Board Thinks Numerals To Be
Too Common upon Campus
at Present
COMMITTEE TO MEET WITHII ROWE
Class numerals will be less common
on the campus hereafter, if the present
plans of the board of directors of the
athletic association are carried out.
At a meeting held yesterday, the
board discussed the present system of
awarding the insignia, and the pre-
vailing opinion seemed to be that the
class numerals were much too easy to
win. During the past season, many
of the class organizations have pe-
titioned for extra numerals for their
athletic teams. In addition, several
campus organizations which have been
given insignia in the past have asked
for the privilege of awarding them this
year.
The board of directors believed that
if the present system' was continued, or
enlarged, numerals would be so com-
mon that the winning of them would be
scarcely worth while.
To consider a complete revision of
the present system, a committee con-
sisting of. Track Manager Emmett F.
Connelly and Phillip Middleditch, set-
retary of the athletic association, was
appointed. These men will confer with
Intramural Director Rowe, and a new,
plan for awarding the numerals will
be drawn up and presented for the
ratification of the board. As the pres-
ent board is unanimous in believing
that the present system has been car-
xied too far, it is probable that a new
plan will be adopted within a short
time.

,
,l
t

The largest singl'e pledge
at the dinner last night was
$25. This sum was paid in ca
association office by a studer
campus.
JAMES CHE NOT, '16, LIES
DEATH IN DETROIT HI
Operation, Following Heart
Finds Leak in Side o
Organ

James Chenot, '16, is lying at the
point of death in Grace hospital, De-
troit, following an unsuccessful oper-
ation performed upon his heart yester-
day morning. Yesterday afternoon he
was reported to be sinking fast, but
he later rallied and his condition re-
mained nearly stationary during most
of the night. At 2:30 o'clock this
morning no change was reported, but
the end was said to be inevitable
though perhaps not immediate.
Chenot has been a chronic sufferer
from rheumatic fever for about t%" o
years, and entered the Detroit hospital
ten days ago after an acute attack of
the fever. His case developed into
heart trouble and an operation was
performed yesterday morning with the
expectation of finding a leaking heart
valve. The leakage, however, was
found to be in the side of the heart
where the organ had bursted and had
allwed blood to flow into the peri-
cardium sac.
Cienot is president of Cercle Fran-
cais and is a member of Delta Theta
Phi law fraternity.

...23 71
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