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April 22, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"1

ie

Michiga n

Dail

SUTBSCRIBE
$1.00

LOCAL

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

CES

!'

at

.PTURES
YARD DASH
r 12 Feet in
e att

TODAY
"Trojan Women" at the Whitney the-
ater, 8:15 o'clock.
Meeting of American Asociation of
Collegiate Registrars in Alumni Me-
morial hall.
TOMORROW
Engineering society dance at Gran-
ger's, 9:00 o'clock.
Law faculty luncheon at Union, 12:00
o'clock.
Hobart Guild party at Harris hall,
8:00 o'clock.
Honorable Stephen Panaretoff, Bulga-
rian ambassador to the United Stat-
es, speaks on, "The Development of
the Bulgarian Language" in the west
gallery of Alumni Memorial hall,
4:15 o'clock.
MAROUETTE PAPE
ATTACKS BASEBALL

OUTLINE PLANS FOR FREIIHMEN
TENNIS TOURNEY LAST NIGHT
About 75 Candidates Hear Short Talks
by Director Rowe and Manager
Steketee
About 75 candidates reported for the
first meeting of the 1915 All-Fresh ten-
nis team in room 348 of the Engineer-
ing building last night. Intramural
Director Rowe and Manager Steketee
gave short talks, and outlined the
work of the spring and the tournament
which is to begin today.
There are to be about five matches
in all, two with Scott high of Toledo
and possible matches with M. A. C.
and Albion. It has been found neces-
sary to finish the first round of the
matches by Saturday, in order to com-
plete the entire tournament before the
first Toledo match which will be play-
ed on May 1.
The names of the men entered in then
tournament, their phone numbers, and
the time at which they will be at home
to arrange for play will be posted on,
the bulletin board at Ferry field. The
matches and phone numbers of con-.
testants follow:
Kirkpatrick (1460) vs. Alden (1167-
W); Rogers (789-M) vs. Stebbins
(1226-M); Coons (144) vs. Woodard
(Continued on page 6)

T a
I MES TE

I* * * *
J.
-Carroll, *
ly.
Smith. *
*
*
e * * *

ALL-FRESH REGULARS READY
TO MEET YPSILANTI SATURDAY
Coach i1ughitt Pleased With Showing
Made by First Team in Fight
against Seconds
For the first time this season, the
All-Fresh regulars beat the seconds in
a three-inning practice game on south
Ferry field, by a score of 12 to 0.
Coach Hughitt was anxious to get
an idea of the worth of his first team
before taking them to Ypsilanti, and
they showed up to the best advantage
of the season. Golden pitched a good
game for the first choice men, allow-
ing but one hit in the three innings of
the game. Lambert and Lutz were.
responsible for long hits which netted
several bases.
The team will journey to Ypsilanti on
Saturday afternoon where they will
meet the Normal aggregation in the
first game of the schedule. The lineups
and summaries of yesterday's game
follow:
First team-Norton cf, Bialoskey 2b,
Drummond 1b, Lambert c, Lutz rf,
Ippel If, Walterhouse ss, Baribeau 3b,
Golden p.
Second team-Johnson lf, Johns cf,
Brown 2b, Hamilton lb, Knowleston rf,
Reem ss, Feld 3b, Alexander c, Good-
speed, Stewart p.
Second team . . .......0 0 0- 0
HELEN MALCOLMSON ANNOUJNCES
ENGAFE11ENT TO CHARLES GORE

Captain Ira Reindel superintended At
the workout of the tennis candidates
yesterday afternoon, about 12 men on

the squad appearing for practice in
spite of threatening skies overhead.
The two Varsity courts were kept busy
from 2:00 o'clock till the game had to
be called on account of darkness, the
members of the squad working out
with each other in successive sets.
All further men who wish to go out
for tennis trust report before the end
of the week, and those men on the
squad who do not report before that
time will be eliminated. The list of
the squad at present, is posted for
reference on the bulletin board at the
Ferry field courts.

TEAMS WILL REPORT PROGRES'
AT GATHERING THIS EVENI
J. E. Moerdyk, Who Recently Ca
from Arabia, to Be Speaker
at Meeting
With a committee of 200 men a
women at the first campaign din:
held at the Methodist church parlk
last night, the annual Busrah ca
paign of the S. C. A. was forma
launched. *There were 27 teams

REINDEL LEADS TENNIS MEN
IN AFTERNOON OF PRACTICE
Squad Will Continue Daily Tryouts
for Remainder of
Week

Dinner Held at Methodist C
Last Evening 200 Men and
Women Prepare for

FORMALLY LAUNCEB'HH gpl

in

*

,t the Pennsyl-
e definitely de-
oon, in the tri-
ach Farrell at

squad, has
ever since
ae wilds of
to make a
.ast night.
I with that
n squad to
by 32 sec-

WORK AFTER REST
Coach Lundgren Will Have Men Take,
Field Today to Prepare
for Came
FIELDING AVERAGES ANNOUNCED

Daily Mining Journal Regrets Summer
Professionalism; Asks Who
Is Responsible.
PROBES PROF. WENLEY'S REPLY
The Daily Mining Journal, of Mar-
quette, Mich., prints the following edi-

right to

, torially in its issue of April 8:
but FACULTY WITHOUT POWER.
and The following from Prof. R. M. Wen-
lash ley, of the TJniversity of Michigan, to
the The Mining Journal tells its own sto-

rst, but carelessly
didn't waste timE
ant heights, how
sed to 11 feet an
he first trial.
raise again an
the first attempt
I it placed at the
necessary to make
vaulted just once
ordered Steve ab-

noon at 11:28
or. The Wol-
ast the fastest
will.do their
t is consider-
sources have

- ry:
"'The Michigan Daily' of April 6,
k quotes in full your recent leader upon
, the question of summer baseball and
e eligibility rules. In this article you
use phrases such as might lead the
- public to infer that the faculty of the
y University of Michigan is responsible
r for the situation. This is a misconcep-
y tion, though a most natural one. In all
e the state universities, so far as I am
- aware, athletics are under the control
d of the faculty. At the University of
Michigan alone the faculty has neither
d say nor responsibility. As a result,
. then, the ugly question before us must
be solved by the responsible authori-
e ties."
The Mining Journal regrets that
- Professor Wenley did not go a little
further and say who these "responsi-
ble authorities" are. Presumably, if
- they are not members of the faculty,
t they are the regents. The student
r body is at the university on suffer-
ance, because it meets certain condi-
tions prescribed by the regents and
the faculty. It has a considerable con-
trol over athletics, but it must bea
delegated control. The authoritie^
that conferred it (the regents?) could
take it away.
That the faculty should have, as
Professor Wenley put it, "neither say
nor responsibility" about university
athletics is an unfortunate condition.
i It would seem that it might well be
entrusted with at least a good share
of the say. Here in Marquette county
we know that university athletics are
on an unsound basis. We have seen
far too many University of Michigan
"amatur" playing in the shirts of
prof io.al ball players to feel much
pride in the University of Michigan
athletic establishment. If we know the
baseball team is sailing under false
colors, suspicion of other teams is not
unnatural.
The leader to which Professor Wen-
ley refers, asserted the view that the
present situation Is hypocritical and
unworthy, and that either the univer-
sity should recognize summer baseball
frankly, or take decisive steps to weed
from its so-called amateur teams all
men who play it. This latter course is
practicable, if the will to enter on ex-
ists.

ALLAN RICKETTS CHOSEN AS
HONOR COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
To fill the place left vacant by Her-
schel Smith, '15E, Allan T. Ricketts,
'15E, was Tuesday chosen chairman
of the committee selected by the class
presidents of the engineering college
for the consideration of an honor sys-
tem. Ricketts was formerly a senior
member of the committee, and Ken-
neth Baxter, '15E, has been chosen
by the president of the senior class to
fill the vacant place. The meeting of
the cdmmittee was postponed until
4:30 o'clock this afternoon, when the
first open session will be held in the
Engineering society room.
REGSISTRARS CLOSE
Election of Officers This Afternoon
Marks End of Annual
Gathering

Helen J. Malcomson, '15, announced
her engagement to Charles W. Gore,
'15L, at a dinner last evening at the
Delta Gamma house, of which sorority
Miss Malcomson is a member. Mr.
Gore is the son of Regent Victor M.
Gore, of Benton Harbor, and is a mem-
ber of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity.
Regents to Hold April Meeting Today
Michigan board of regents will hold
their regular April meeting this morn-
ing in the regents' room in the law
building.
FOOTBALLTRYOUTS'
PRACTICE IN OPEN

Following two days of vacation af-
ter their strenuous trip through Dixie-
land, the Wolverine nine will take the
field this afternoon in the first of the
two practice sessions which precede
for Saturday. Coach Lundgren is ex-
pected back from the visit to his fam-
ily, and will lead his charges through'
a couple -of stiff drills.
Charlie Ferguson has been improv-
ing in physical condition right along,
and there is a good chance that the
veteran twirler may be in shape to
work for at least a part of the game
against the men from Cleveland,
The fielding averages of the men
who went south with the team follow:
Player 11os. Chances Errors Pet.
Davidson, p ........9 0 1.000
Harshman, c........9 0 1.000
Labadie, If.7 0 1.000
McNamara, p.......5 0 1.000
Caswell, p......... 4 0 1.000
Soddy, p .,.......... 1 0 1.000
Benton, c......68 1 .985
McQueen, 2b. ..32 1 .968
Maltby, lb........60 2 .967
Sisler, rf. .. .13 1 .923
Brandell, ss .....26 4 .846
Sheehy, of.........13 2 .846
Waltz, 3b..........18 5 .722
Nichols, p.:......6 2 .667

Yo4's Call Brings 22 Men for
Workout of Year at
Ferry Field

First

LEAVE ON NIAGARA FALLS TRIP COACH INSTRUCTS IN RUDIMENTS

7

Tickets

attendan e, and although each team
was represented by at least 5 mem-
bers, it is expected that the meeting
tonight will see more than 300 stu-
dents engaged in the mammoth can-
vass.
P. V. Ramsdell, '16, in formally
launching the campaign, made an ap-
peal for steady work on the part of all
the men and women actually engaged
in the quest for funds, and he made
the statement that if each member of
each team raised six dollars for each
of the three days of the canvass, the
total budget of $3700 would be more
than taken care of by Saturday night.
A brief explanation of the work be-
ing done along similar line at Yale
University was made by H. H. Vree-
land, Jr., registrar of the Shefield Sci-
entific School at Yale. Yale annually
raises a budget three times as large
as that being asked for by the local
association, for a misisonary project
which it supports in Asia.
L. C. Reimann, '17L, president-elect
of the Y. M. C. A., spoke briefly on be-
half of what the men were going to do
in the campaign, and Marion F. Stowe,
'16, who was recently elected president
of the Y. W. C. A., spoke of what the
women might be expected to do.
The campaign canvass will begin
today, and at the meeting which will
be held at 5:30 o'clock tonight in the
Methodist church, the first reports of
progr~ess will be made. An effort is
also being made to have W. C. Mullen-
dore, '16L, as a special speaker at the
dinner tonight. J. E. Moerdyk, who
has but recently returned from Arabia,
has consented to be at the dinner, and
will speak ofuthe prevailing conditions
in and about Bus rah station.
FOREIGN AMBASSADOR TO TALK
IN MEMORIAL HALL TOMORROW

soph prom, which
[ay 7, at the Armory,
yesterd>ay for soph-
ey may be obtained
'afternoon this week
o'clock, or from any
nembers of the gen-
E. W. Collins, '17E;
E. J. Huntington,
-awford, '17; H. S.
Taylor, '17E; W. K.
R. Akers, '17E; Gor-
J. H. Connelly, '17;

Today's meetings will mark the
close of the sixth annual convention
of the American Association of Collegi-
ate Registrars, the last official busi-
ness on the program being the election'
of officers, which will occur at 4:00
o'clock this afternoon.
Arthur W. Tarbelj, of the Carnegie
Institute of Technology, will deliver'
this morning's lecture on the depart-
ment of dramatic art at that institu-
tion. This lecture will be followed by
a general conference at 9:00 o'clock,
at which time general problems of ad-
ministration are to be considered.
Perhaps the most interesting sub-
ject treated during the session this
year will be that of the co-operative
plan of instruction at Cincinnati Uni-
versity. Lelia Garvin Hartman, of
Cincinnati University, will deliver an
address upon this subject at 1:30
o'clock this afternoon.
The general conference, on records
and statistics, scheduled for 2:00
o'clock, will be followed by the elec-
tion of officers, after which the conven-
tion will 'adjourn.
A side trip has been planned to Niag-
ara Falls, the train leaving this even-
ing, and a large number of the visit-
ing registrars have signified their in-
tention of making the trip.
The feature of yesterday's session
was the lecture given last night by
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of the philos-
ophy department. Professor Wenley
spoke on the subject, "American Uni-
versities as Seen Through the Eyes of
a Foreigner."

In answer to Coach Yost's call, 22
candidates for the 1915 football team
appeared at Ferry field yesterday for
the first formal practice of the spring
training period. Included in the squad
were several veterans, but. Captain
Cochran was the only man who won
an "M" last year to appear. Trap-
hagen, guard on the Varsity in 1913,
who has returned to college this sem-
ester, was out.
The men who appeared for yester-
day's workout were: Cophran, Fink-
beiner, Hildner, Millard, Skinner,,
Traphagen, Smith, Dunn, Raymond,
Johnson, Fullenweider, Schupp, War-
ner, Beibor, Brazell, Joseph Kohr,
Sharp, Cerney, Huss and Biner. Rehor
was on.,hand for part of the time, but
he did not put on his togs.
The coach started the drill by giving
the men a short practice in the throw-
ing and catching of forward passes.
He then devoted considerable time to
talking to the men on the rudiments
of the game, kicking, passing and car-
rying the ball all receiving some at-
tention.
The squad was divided up into five.
groups of four and five men. With one
man acting as center and the others
as backs,. the ball was carried up and
down the field until the coach finally
called a halt.
It is not definitely known when
Schultz will arrive in Ann Arbor, but
he may drop in at any time. All of the4
candidates are expected at today's
practice, veterans included. 1

SALE OF TICKET. FOR CERCLE
FRANCAIS' COMEDY COMMENCES
Student tickets sale for the annual
play of the Cercle Francais, "La Pou-
dre aux Yeux," will begin today at
Wahr's State street bookstore. The
pasteboards will be on sale from 8:00
o'clock to 10:00 o'clock and from 2:00
o'clock to 5:00 o'clock today and to-
morrow, and will be sold Monday at
the same hours to the general public.
Holders of associate membership tick-
ets in the Cercle may turn them in
today or tomorrow with instructors in
the French department for. coupons.
These may be exchanged for any 50
cent seat in the house, or will be ac-
cepted as 50 cents toward the purchase
of a 75 cent or $1.00 seat,
J. G. Jones, '15D, Undergoes Operation
.T. G. Jones, '15D, was operated on
yesterday for appendicitis by the uni-
versity health service physicians. He
was reported to be resting comfortably
last night.
Prof. Trtieblood to Address Assembly
Prof. T. C. Trueblood, of the oratory
department, has been secured to ad-
dress the assembly of the junior en-
gineers, to be held at 9:00 o'clock
tomorrow.

Speaks on "The Development of the
Bulgarian Language" at.
4:15 O'clock
Hon. Stephen Panaretoff, Bulgarian
ambassador to the United States will
d'eliver an address under the auspices
of the university at 4:15 o'clock Fri-
day in Memorial hall Panaretoff, who
will talk on, "The Development of the
Bulgarian Language," is at present en-
gaged in compiling the first complete
Bulgarian dictionary. He is a remark-
able linguist, speaking readily 10 dif-
ferent languages.
Panaretoff is the first Bulgarian am-
bassador to America, and has done
much to effect friendly diplomatic re-
lations between the two nations. He
was professor in.Roberts College, Con-
stantinople, for over 20 years.
Pick Membership Party Committeemen
Committeemen for the Union mem-
bership party to be held Saturday
night will be D. R. Ballentine, '16,
chairman, W. W. Seabury, '17E, Cyril
Talbot, '17, and Leroy D. Powell, '18.
Harold Schradzski, '15L, was chairman
at the affair on the first Saturday night
of vacation, and W. W. Watson, '16E,
officiated as chairman last Saturday.
Plans are maturing for a Varsity track
dance, similar to the baseball and foot-
ball parties held before the holidays.

kpril 26, the
to the general
be obtained at
>m the general
nt indications,
hich is limited
d by the early
a price of the
at $2.50.

een I

tomorrow.

ball parties held before the holidays.

SEATS

T AT

DESK,

d

Given by the
LITTLE THEATRE
COMPANY OF
CHICACO
PRICES
25c., 50c., .75c.,
and $1.00

y!

8.15 TONIGHT

at New Whitney Theatre

..... ....ems

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