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April 06, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-06

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EDAILY
MORNING j
$1.00 LOCAL

he

Michigan

Daily

I

SUSCRIBE
NOWY
$1.00

#';

ANN ARBOR; MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 6, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

_ _

H5ITY WINS ON
EGUILR DIAMOND
h Lundgren's First Choice Trounce
Scrubs by a 7 to 0 Score;
Brandell Garners
Two Hits
[ON SLAMS BALL FOR FOUR
LCKS WITH ONE MAN ON BASE
D Lasted But Five Innings, First
Two Being Played on South
Ferry Field

TODAY
Dean C. H. Benjamin, of Purdue, lec-
tures on "Standards," in room 348
engineering building, 4:30 o'clock.
Prof. R. M. Wenley speaks to the fresh
lit assembly in University hall, 4:15
o'clock.
Totem club meets in room 105 north
wing, 7:00 o'clock.
Indiana club dinner, Michigan Union,
6:00 o'clock.
Comedy club members meet in Cercle
Francais rooms, 4:00 o'clock.
Dixie club meeting at Union, 7:30
o'clock.

Defeating the scrubs by a 7 to 0
core in the first game to be played on
he regular Varsity diamond this year,
oach Lundgren's first choice started
)ff on its last week of practice prior
o leaving for the south. Brandell,.
rith two hits and two runs, and Ben-
on with a homer which scored two
uns in the fifth starred for the reg-
lars.
The Varsity scored once in the first,
nd was held runless for the next two
nings, when it regained its effective
ttack and punched home four scores.
Vith one man on in the fifth, Benton
it Payette's delivery for a four base
lout over the head of Boyle in center
eld, and Brandell and Benton cross-
d the plate to make the score seven.
The game started on the south Fer-
y field diamond, but as soon #as the
egular ground was rolled, the nines
nigrated northward, only two in-
ings being played on the far lot.
'homas closed the second inning with
beautiful catch of a liner from
Valtz's bat. The ball looked like a
ood extra base hit, being on the rise
'hen the scrubs' second basemar rut.
short by jumping a .foot off the
round to gather it in. The other field-
ag feature of the day was Paterson's
atch of a foul fly near the third base
leachers, the left fielder just manag-
ig to reach around the then active
team roller to catch the man out.

Varsity
AB
ef ..........3
-n'rf''........3
n 2b ........3
11 ss ........3
c ...........2
n If .........3
lb .........2
. p .... ....2

R_
0
0
2
2
1
1
0
0

H
0
0
1
2
1
1
0

A
-0
1
2
2
1
0
0
0

O
0
1
1
0
1
2
4

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

TOTALS .........23 7' 6 7 15
Scrubs

1i

AB
rt lb .........3
as 2b ..... .3
son ss .......2

lilvel 3b .........2
oyle cf ........ ..2
:cGraw if .........2
aton rf ...........2
rause c.........2
cNamara p .... ..2
ayette p.........0.
TOTALS ........20

R
0
0
0
0,
0
0
0
0
0
0.
0
4
0
4

H
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
5

A
0
0
0
0'
0
0
0
0
3
1
4

0
4
2
2
0
0
0
0
2
4
1
15

E
2
1
0_
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

TOMORROW
Irving Macomber of Toledo lectures to
Commerce club at Union, 8:00
o'clock.
Prof. H. L. Wilgus, of the Law School,
lectures on "Libels," in room , 203
University hall, 2:00 o'clock.
Boat club dance at Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Prof. T. C. Trueblood's class in Shakes-
pearean reading gives recital of "As
You Like It," in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall, 8:00 o'clock.
BEGIN TO PREPARE
FOR DRAKE RELAYS
Coach Farrell Satisfied With Showing
of Track Squad at Chicago,
Everything Considered
fMY ENTER HALF MILE TEAM
Satisfied with the showing under
existing conditions, Coach Farrell and
his track squad returned from Chica-
go, and have begun active prepara-
tions for the Drake relays.
Corbin's showing in the high hur-
dles was more than satsfactory, the
Michigan man winning the event in
the fast time of seven seconds' fiat.
,Carroll's performance in the mile was
also pleasing, for although, he did not
win, he finished second, far in advance
of any of the- college competitors who
had entered. Ray, the I. A. C. man
who won, is a sensational runner, as
his time of 4:22 2-5 indicates.
Ufer's misfortune in the half mile
spoiled an excellent race, as "Joe"
and Osborne, the conference star,
were the pick of the field. Ufer was
right behind Osborne, when he fell
along in the middle of the race. The
Northwestern captain disposed of the
rest of the field with ease, finishing
yards andyards ahead in 2:00 3-5.
The pole vault saw Wilson elimin-
ated at 11 feet 6 inches, but the condi-
tions were the same as exist outdoors,
and Wilson has not even been on Fer-
ry field this season.
The coach will devote the most of
his time to the half-milers and milers,
as the Drake relays are scheduled for
April 17. Ufer, Carroll and Fox are
certain to run on the four mile team,
with either Donnelly or Grauman fig-
uring as the fourth man. The coach
will conduct half mile trials, to decide
whether Michigan will enter a half
mile team in addition to the four mile
squad.
TWO STUDENTS G0 UNDER KNIFE
Operate on G. D. Peters and H. F. Rob-
inson for Appendicitis
Guy D. Peters, '17D, and Harold F.
Robinson, '18E, were operated upon
yesterday afternoon by university hos-
pital physicians, when they were found
to be suffering from appendicitis. Both
men were reported to be resting com-
fortably last night. George .D. Sutton,
'15M, who was operated upon for ap-
pendicitis last Thursday, is reported
by university hospital authorities to
be showing marked improvement.
Mathematicians Return from Chicago
Professors Ziwet, Ford, Bradshaw,
and Love have returned from Chicago
where they were in attendance at a
meeting of the American Mathematical
society. Professor Ford read a paper
entitled "On the Representation of Ar-
bitrary Functions by Definite Inte-

grals" and Professor Love delivered
a paper "On Linear ifference and Dif-
ferential Equations."

MINSTREL PLAY TO
~ IlNNEREGATTA
Louis K. Friedman, '15, in Charge of
Preparations for Entertainment
Scheduled for
May 24
NAME CHAIRMEN TO CONDUCT
NEW CAMPAIGN FOR MEMBERS
Varied Program Decided Upon for
Water Carnival This Spring In-
cludes Racing Contests
Members of the Boat club will give
a minstrel show on Friday night, May
24, in order to raise funds for the re-
gatta to be held on Barton pond, May
29. and to arouse interest in the crew
racing projects of the club. Committee-
men have peen appointed from among
members to carry on a membership
campaign immediately after the spring
vacation, and to make plans for the
regatta, and for the dance to be given
at the Union at 8:30 o'clock tomorrow
night.
Louis K. Friedman, '15, is in charge
of the minstrel show preparations, and
he and his assistants are beginning
active work on the project. If per-
mission can be secured, the show will
be staged in Hill auditorium. The
affair will assume proportions similar
to the "Band Bounce," though the pro-
gram will be of considerably different
make-up.
Various actors in the Union opera,
and other popular entertainers will be
secured to give specialty features. Co-
operation of the Varsity musical clubs
and the band will be asked, and some
skit will probably be included on the
program. Proceeds are to be devoted
largely to defray the expenses of the
regatta, and to back the club's plans
for instituting crew racing at Mich-
igan.
Chairmen, who have been appointed
to help in the house-to-house member-
ship canvass, slated for the two weeks
following the holidays, are as follows:
G. I. Murphy, '16, E. P. Wright, '16E,
R. S. Collins, '16, H. M. Warner '16,
J. W. Thomas, '16, M. S. Reed, '16E,
H. C. Buell, '16E, R. Collins, '17E, Har-
ry }Qell, '16L, and Staatz Abrams, '17E.
These men will meet with the general
chairman at the Union at 7:30 o'clock'
tonight, in order to receive instruc-
tions and to pick committees of 10 to
15 men each.
All committeemen will gather for a
smoker at the Union on the night after
the return from the holidays, and will
start out on the house-to-house can-
vassing, from which they will report
at the Union each night until all stu-
dents and faculty men on the campus
are solicited. The card system a the
general scheme of the life memjiihip
canvass of the Union last year, will
be employed.
The program for the afternoon of
the spring regatta as decided upon,
will include, according to present
plans, the following events: A cham-
pionship race with eight-oared shells,
between the Grand Rapids and Detroit
boat clubs; the water marathon from
Lakeland to Barton pond; three canoe
events open both to students and out-
side organizations, several of which
have practically promised to compete;
two canoe events open only to stu-
dents; one 50-yard, and one 150-yard
swimming dash; three diving events;
a tub race and several other feature
events; exhibitions in resuscitation.
Numerous cups and trophies are being

arranged by Sidney T. Steen, '16E,
and correspondence is being carried
on with several outside water clubs.
DRAMA AND WOMEN'S LEAGUES
STAGE "TROJAN WOMEN" SOON
Hill auditorium has been secured for
the presentation of "The Trojan Wom-
en" on April 22. The play is to be
given by a company from the Little
Theater of Chicago, which has achiev-
ed an international reputation for its
productions and its experiments along
new lines of staging and lighting.
The play has been secured for Ann
Arbor theater-goers through the ef-
forts of the Drama League and the
Women's League. A liberal donation
from the Carnegie Peace fund has
made it possible for this production to;
be put on the road, since the players,
and staff of the Little Theater Com-
pany 'receive no salary, apart from.
their living expenses. Entire net prof-
its of the production will be devoted
to the Woman's Peace party.

misconduct.

Probation for miscon-I

FIX PUNISHMENTS
FOR MIlSCONDUCT
Engineering College Introduces Proba-
tion and Warning as Pen-
alties for Minor
Offenses
BECOMES PART OF RECORD BUT
MAY SAVE FROM SUSPENSION
University of Wisconsin Uses System
of Graded Penalties
with Success
The college of engineering has in-
troduced, as punishments for minor
offenses, probation and warning for

duct carries with it a warning that a
repetition of the offenise, or the com-
mission of a similar offense, will ren-
der the student liable to suspension.
This probation becomes a part of the
student's official record, and is report-
ed to his parent or guardian. In many
cases, this punishment will save the
student from suspension and enable
him to make good in college, if he is
madeof the right stuff, and if his sub-
sequent conduct shows that he is
worth saving.
In a similar manner, students on
probation for scholarship may escape
the "home list" by passing 12 hours of
assigned work. In both cases the stu-
dent has a chance to correct his mis-
take and adopt higher standards. In
a recent case brought before the com-
mittee on discipline, a student was
placed on probation for misconduct
and marked "E" in the course for copy-
ing from another student's bluebook in
a written exercise.
The University of Wisconsin has for
two years employed a system of grad-
ed punishments, including probation
and warning for misconduct. A com-
mittee of the whole university admin-
isters this system, recommending fac-
ulty action in all cases of suspension
and expulsion but acting in minor
cases, reporting their findings to the
faculty. Cheating in examination has
been largely eliminated by placing
students on probation, marking them
"E" in the course, and adding four
hours to the graduation requirements,
the probation remaining in force until
the current assignment of studies and
four extra hours in the subsequent
semester are passed. Prof. F. L. Pax-
son, formerly professor of history in
the University of Michigan, is chair-
man of the general committee on dis-
cipline.
TO APPEAR IN RECORD TIME'
Michiganensian 'Editorial Staff Ends
Work This Week
Final work of the editorial staff on
the 1915 Michiganensian will end this
week. All that remains to be accom-
plished is the indexing of the annual,
as the work of reading first proofs end-
ed last night.
All proof will be sent to the engrav-
'er in Grand Rapids on Friday, togeth-
er with the complete index, and Man-
aging Editor W. B. Thom, '15, will go
to that city to read final proof on the
book.
The annual will be placed on sale
May 1, this year, thus appearing in
record time, as the earliest that. a
Michiganensian has been published
heretofore is May 19.
STAR ATHLETE FROM HOPE MAY
ENTER UNIVERSITY NEXT FALL
According to reports from Hope col-
lege, Michigan may receive one of the
athletic lights of that place next fall.
Veenker, who is rated as one of the
most versatile performers in the Dutch
college, has left, and according to what
he said before leaving, next fall will
see him enrolled at the University of
Michigan. Veenker is rated as a star
halfback besides being a fast basket-
ball and baseball player.
Union To Hold Dances During Vacation
Membership dances will be held at
the Union during the spring vacation,
including Saturday night of this week.
Committeemen for this week's party
are Harold Schradzki, '15L, chairman,
Joseph Drake, '16, Christian Mack,
'16E and William W. Williams, '&.
Other .functions of the Union will be
continued during the holidays includ-

ing the cafe, lounging rooms and em-
ployment bureau.

FINISH FINAL ARRANGEMENTS
FOR ENGINEERS' SPRING TRIP
,,Party of 25 Will Leave April 9 on
Annual Easterni Tour
of Inspection
Mechanical and electrical engineers,
whb will make up the annual mechan-
ical engineers' spring tour of inspec-
tion, have completed final arrange-
ments for the trip. The party is now
composed of about 25 men, including
I the electrical engineers who had sign-
ed up for the electrical engineering
trip. It will be conducted by Prof.
John R. Allen and Commander J. H.
Rowan, of the mechanical engineering
department.
The inspection trip will leave Ann
Arbor April 9, and will make stops
of from one to three days. Among the
main places of interest to be visited
are the Youngstown Sheet and Tube
Co.; Crescent Steel Co., Pittsburg;
Congressional Library, Navy Yard,
Bureau of Printing and Engraving, and
Capitol building, Washington; Bald-
win Locomotive Works, Philadelphia;
New York Ship Building Co., Camden;
White Star Liner and Waterside sta-
tion, New York; General Electric Co.,
Schenectady; and the Niagara Hydrau-
lic Power Co., International Paper Co.,
and the Ontario Power Co., Niagara
Falls. The party will return to Ann
Arbor April 19.
OFFERS OPINION ON
SUMMERBAEBAL
Editorial in Marquette Alining Journal
Shows Question Rouses
Much Interest
CALLS IT "A BAD) SIUATION"
That the summer baseball agitation
now occupying the minds of the Mich-
igan students, is being closely watched
all over the state, is shown by the'
following editorial, reprinted from the
Marquette Mining Jornal. It shows
that editors are interested in the activ-
ities and problems which face the
students of the state university. the
editorial is entitled "A Bad Situation,"
and is as follows:
"The editor of The Michigan Daily
admits frankly what we all know, that
the varsity baseball team is made up
in large part of players who accept
money for summer baseball, and that
these same players, as an incident to
each varsity season, give solemn as-
surance, presumably on their words
as gentlemen, that they are not paid
for summer baseball. With the asser-
tion of the editor that this is v deplor-
able condition there must be'general
agreement.
"It is so highly deplorable, in fact,
that it would seem to demand the at-
tention of the faculty, or even of the
regents, who must be cognizant of it.
To the man who cannot grasp the
hairsplitting arguments by which this
sort of procedure is justified, it ap-
pears that a system that annually per-
mits a number of young men solemnly
to attest to a lie, and to be none the
worse off for this false conduct, is
mighty poor training for rectitude in
later relations of life.
"The question of summer baseball is
debatable. Some persons competent to
express opinion believe it should be
authorized, although the majority is
strongly against it. But there appears
to be little room for debate about a
system that permits the faculty and
board of control of a great institution
to sit bfy, knowingly, while a consider-

able number of young men under their
direction annually attest to a lie, that
they may be members of an athletic
team.
"The university should get straight
on this thing. It should eit -.ay:
"Yes, we have men who play r
baseball on our team, and we 6 xi to
book our games with that un c3-
ing," or it should open vigorous war-
fare on summer baseball players and
see that they are rigorously excluded
from varsity sport. The most import-
ant thing for the university to do is to
put an end to the flagrant hypocrisy
and false dealing that has character-
ized its handling of this question."
Ferry Field Loses Record in Hurdles
H. L. Lampert, a Los Angeles high
school boy, broke the world's inter-
scholastic record in the low hurdles
Saturday, covering the distance in 24
2-5. Cory held the previous mark
of 24 4-5, setting it on Ferry field at a
Michigan interscholastic meet.

MAY PUT GRIDIRON
STAR UNDER KNIFE
"Johinnie" Maulbetsch, Crack Halfback,
Reported in Serious Condition
Requiring Surgical
Treatment

Innings
Scrubs
Varsity

BASKETBALL GAMES BROUGHT
ON CRITICAL STAGE OF TROUBLE
Dr. C.G.)arling, His Physician, Would
Make No Statement about
Patient Last Night
"Johnnie" Maulbetsch, All-American
halfback last fall, and star offensive
player of the Michigan Varsity, ex-
pects to go under the surgeon's knife
during the Easter holidays. Whether
he will have his appendix removed or
be operated on for stomach trouble,
has not yet been determined by his
physicians.
Maulbetsch has been in St. Joseph's
sanitarium in this city for the past few
days, where his condition has been the
subject of careful study. The gridiron
star's digestion bothered him during
the football season last fall, and the
recurrence of the disorders this spring
at last compelled him to go to the hos-
pital.
Participation in the recent basket-
ball games of the football men brought
the trouble to a critical stage, and
Maulbetsch was no longer able to ig-
nore his condition, which the physi-
cians state is serious, and the opera-
tion will by no means be a minor one.
Dr. C. G. Darling, the physician in
attendance on the case of Maulbetsch,
when asked for information in regard
to the condition of the gridiron .hero,
refused last night to give any hint as
to the state of his patient's health, or
as to whether the operation would be
serious or not. Mrs. Maulbetsch, how-
ever, stated that her son would need to
undergo a difficult operation.
IMPROVEMENTS MAKE PALMER
FIELD ATTRACTIVE FOR WOMEN
Will Build Four Tennis Courts, Grade
Field and Better
Clubhouse
Work has already been begun on
extensive 'improvements on Palmer
field, which, when completed, will
make this athletic and recreation
ground for women one of the most
convenient and up-to-date in the coun-
try.

......1
.......0
......1

2
0
0

3
0'
0

5 R
0-0
2-7

H
5
6

E'
3'
1

Hits-off Caswell, 5

in 5 innings;I

off McNamara, 4 in 4 innings; off Pay-
ette, 2 in 1 inning. Struck out-by Mc-
Namara, 4; by Caswell, 3. Base on
balls-off McNamara, 2. Home run-
Benton. Two base hit-Brandell.
Time of game-1 hour, 25 minutes.
Willard Defeats Johnson in 26th Round
HAVANA, April 5.-Jess Willard
won the heavyweight championship of
the world here this afternoon, when he
knocked out Jack Johnson in the 26th
round of the battle for the title. Wil-
lard floored the former champion with
a terific right swing to the jaw, and
Johnson took the count. Up to the
22nd round, Johnson had the advan-
tage of the milling, but he tired in
this period and from then on through
to the end, the white man carried the
battling to the colored champion.
About 17,000 people saw the title
change hands. Willard weighed 238
pounds and Johnson 225.
Former Economies Instructor Marries
Frank B. Bernard, '12, formerly an
instructor in the economics depart-
ment, and Miss Gladys Jenny were
married Saturday at Muncie, Indiana.
Mr. Bernard is an official in a Muncie

One-fourth of the hill on which the
present two tennis courts are located
is being taken off, and the lower part
will be graded and drained. Four new
tennis courts will be made on top of
the new hill, the field south of which
will be levelled and prepared as a
place for group games. The north
field will be extensively repaired for
hockey and archery.
The clubhouse will receive many im-
provements, among which are showers,
electric lights, and telephones. In
time a fence will be built entirely sur-
rounding the field. The department of
landscape gardening is to assist the
designing of the decorative features.
The present Palmer field sinking
fund is to be utilized to put in two
fine courts just north of the new New-
berry hall of residence. Those will
be begun at once, and will also be'
used for this spring's outdoor work.
One court of the Newberry hall courts
will be open for general use by uni-
versity women at all hours of the day.
The other Newberry court and the two
now available on Palmer field will be
in use for required work at 11:00,
2:00, 3:00, and 4:00 o'clock Mondays,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thurs-
days, but will be open for general use
at all other times.
Distribute "The Senior Law Crease"
"The Senior Law Crease," the offi-
cial publication of the senior law class,
was distributed at Granger's last night,
when the grave and solemn members
of the legal department gathered for
their annual evening of dancing and
merry-making. The publication be-
sides containing the evening's program
is made up or snappy editorials, and
stories of the faculty and upperclass-
men. The dance was restricted to sen-
iors, and those who could not obtain
their issues of "The Crease" last night
may secure them at the law building,
from 9:00 o'clock to 12:00 o'clock to-
day.

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