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April 02, 1915 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-02

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C

Michigan

Daily

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Aq

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 1915.

PAT M w I

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WEATHE PREVENTS
PRACTICE CONFLICT

I

CROWD ENTHUSES
ON SECOND NIGHT

Root

TODAY
Biological luncheon, south wing
University hall, 4th floor, 12
o'clock.
Prof. W. H. Hobbs addresses meet
of the Michigan Academy of Scien
botany museum lecture room, 9
o'clock to 12:00 o'clock.
"Opera" number of the Gargoyle go
on sale at 12:00 o'clock.

E TO RUN IN
EAT SATURDAY
at 10:28 O'clock
A. U. Indoor
ho live in Chicago,
'ort the Wolverine
r at the Central
et in the Windy
st official appear-
sity of Michigan
since 1906, and
higan alumni have
strongly. A ban-
the week, and the
n are planning to
ody. Since Mich-

of
C:00
ing
ce,
:00
oes.
lit-
:15

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'
P'
;',.

SUBlSTITUTES FIELDING

WO

Lundgren Calls Off Five Inning Ga
When Snowflakes Fall
on Field

Lme
RK
uth
n's
kes

Boreas broke out again on sou
Ferry field, keeping Coach Lundgre
protegees so busy dodging snow-fia]

Grinstead, McMahon, Dunne and Q
ver Repeat Successes; Wood
Comes to Fore
ARRANGE APRIL 9 PERFORMAN
Enthusiastic applause and a pac
house welcomed the second appe
ance of "All That Glitters" att
Whitney last night. More willingn
to applaud on the part of the audien
and smoother work by the cast a
chorus marked last night's perfor

;ro-
CIE
ked
ar-
the
ess
ne
ind
rm-

Michigan Union opera, "All That
ters," Whitney theater, at
o'clock.

G
8

TOMORROW
Women's luncheon at 12:30 o'clock.
Red Cross examinations in University
Health Service office, at 1:00 o'clock.
Matinee performance of the Michigan
Union Opera, "All That Glitters,"
Whitney theatre, 2:15 o'clock.
Junior Girls' play, Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall, at 3:00 o'clock.
Alumnae Reception and Banquet, Bar-
bour Gymnasium, 3:00 o'clock.
Rifle club dinner at the Union, at 6:00
o'clock.

r

erred to
ing the
nent in
n is ex-

Michigan Union Opera, "All That Gl
ters," Whitney theater, 8:15 o'cloc

it-
:k.

meet have offici-
total registration
are scheduled to

AEBACK"
R SMOOUTH,

i

and swinging their arms to keep warn
that the Michigan mentor had to cal
quits on the five inning game that h
had planned for yesterday afternoon'
practice session, and confined his me
to light practice.
When the coach was forced to cal
off the game which he had planned on
he started the men at work on infield
ers' practice and bunting, giving the
entire squad a thorough drill in the
elements of the elusive art of beating
out a slow one to first.
Davidson and Nichols alternated it
the box while one set of men was run-
ning bases and bunting. Dwyer held
down first, with Smith at second.
Thomas at short and Eaton at third.
Shepard did the receiving for the two
pitchers, and bunting was the sole or-
der of the day for the batters. Eaton
got in fast on some of the short ones,
but the best defensive factor against
the bunting of the remaining men was
Shepard's arm. He showed an ability
yesterday to cover his quarter of the
diamond in good shape, and his wing-
ing to first on bunts cut short many
a safe one.
The coach drove his other men out
on the field and shifted them around,
while the men who had been fielding'
got in a few chances at the bunting
game themselves. The day closed
with a short session of gathering in
flys by the outfielders, who were given
a last warming up exercise as a top-
ping off of the day's practice.
One week of practice is all that re-
mains to the Varsity tryouts, the team
leaving here a week from today for
Lexington, where the first game of the
1915 schedule will be played a week
from tomorrow. A few more chances
to hold practice games is all that the
coach wants between . w and that
time, and, weather favoring, he will
hold them next week. .

act that there
entered in the
ecided to runf

n,
e
sJ
,11

11
c ,
1-
.e
e
'
d
E,
t.
q
1
,,
.
i
7
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a'
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ance.
E The hits of the evening easily were
, "There Are No Tears Or Sorrows." by
- Grinstead and McMahon, and "The
Storm," the dance by Grinstead and
Dunne. Grover, in the role of Annette,
the captivating head manicurist, again
won his way to the hearts of those
who saw him. At the close of the
show, one of the gallery gods was
heard to remark, "He certainly can
use them eyes."t
Morrison Wood, in the part of Le-
fevre, one of the rivals for the hand of
Annette, deserves especial commen-'
dation for the manner in which he
handled his role. In the "Cheer Up"
number, with the assistance of the.
pony chorus, he drew rounds of ap-
plause.
The one criticism which may be of-
fered concerns the length of the sec-
ond act. Some of the specialty artists
were too ready to take encores, al-
though they made distinct hits. Owing
to the duration of the final scene, the
clog dance by T. J. Doyle, '15L, was
omitted from the program. Direc-
tor Sanger was satisfied with the act,
but thought that it did not fit in well
with the action.
The final Ann Arbor performance of
the opera will be staged at the Whit-
ney theater on Friday night, April 9.
The seat sale for this show will com-
mence at 10:00 o'clock tomorrow at the
box office of the Whitney theatre, and
will last through to the date of the
performance. The opera has played to
capacity houses the last two nights,
and but a few scattered seats and
boxes are left for this week's appear-
aic . About 200 orders for tickets
have been received by the management,
and the extra show is the result. 9

:d
s
i

Copies of the operatic number of the
Michigan Gargoyle will be available
at noon today in front of the State
street stores. This edition of the fun-
book bears the title "Operatic" by vir-
tue of the marked absence of any ref-
erence to the Mimes production.
It will however be featured with con-
tributions by M. C. Wier, H. P. Scott
and E. S. Everett, instructors of rhet-
oric in the university. F. C. Bade, ex-
managing editor of the Gargoyle, Har-
old Upjohn and Alan Honey, former
members of the staff, have also writ-
ten. Credit is also due Roy Parsons,
'14E, Harold Schradzki, '15L, H. B.
Carpenter, '14-'17L, and D. T. Hoffman,
'17, for making this number one of the
year's best.

i

Toa
"Possibly four-fifths or nin
of all destruction caused by

Academy of Science Schedul
General Meetings for
Today

I

I

quakes can be prevented by the

I

RHETORIC INSTRUCTORS TR'
WRITN OHUMORFOR GARGOY
M. C. Wier, H. P. Scott and E. S. Eve
Contribute to Operatic
Number

Ir

r'

I

I construction of our

I.

Prof. W. H. Hobbs, of the geo

I

i

Dinner Brings Rifle Season to Close
Michigan's indoor rifle season will
come to a formal close when the mem-
bers of the Rifle club meet at the
Union tomorrow evening for their
final get-together. The gathering will
take the form of a 6:00 o'clock dinner
for all men interested in shooting.
The members of the committee and the
officers of the club are now making
arrangements for speakers.

partment, in his lecture on '
Italian Earthquakes" before a
crowd of Michigan schoolmaster
others in Hill auditorium last n
He also pointed out in his li
that in general earthquakes ca
predicted with great precision
place and to some extent as to
"What causes the complete destri
of buildings and whole towns is
they are built on movable founda
such as sand." He also stated
reinforced cement was invaluab
the construction of buildings.
The lecture by Prof. W. H. H
proved to be the"feature of yester
program of the Schoolmasters'
All through the day large numbe
pedagogues arrived to take part i
fiftieth annual meeting of the M2
gan Schoolmasters' club. Registrt
headquarters reported a total of a
500.

ELF
rett

i

I

SR TALK Of ELECTIONS

Geologist Tells Schoolmasters S
Can Be Predicted and That
Moveable Foundations
Cause Losses
MANY SECTIONAL CONFEREN(
TAKE PLACE THIS AFTERT

i

HOBBS DISCUS
jACTION OF'QU

S:

Women Present Play by Elean
Stalker in Honor of
Seniors

or
lN

*sI
-IDEPICT

ALL - WOMAN MICHIGA

. running
should be

n the
.e
;men

Wilson and
Michigan team,
act as starter,
s work in all

LTES ORDER
OGS TIED UP

edict issued yester-
3ealth Officer J. A.
in Ann Arbor must
next 30 days, Fail-
. the edict will re-
execution by the
1 running loose.
local official this
because of the fact
>y George Stoll, of
t, which was shot
een found by uni-

"The Come Back," by Eleanor Stalk-
er, the eleventh of the annual junior
women's plays, was presented in honor
i of the senior women in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall last evening in a perform-
ance remarkable for its smoothness
1 and spirit.
Cap-and-gowned audience and vari-
costumed performers alike entered
heartily into the spirit of fun generat-
ed by the brilliant little play, which
depicts happenings in Ann Arbor in
2002, when Michigan is represented as
a wholly feminine university. Com-
plications begin when 'the daring Ger-
als, portrayed by Elsa Apfel, '16, ap-
pears to try to reinstate himself and
his brother exiles, Miss Apfel will be
remembered as the individual star of
the production.
Gertrude Roos, '16, as the captivating
Shirley, with whom he falls in love,
and Pauline Emerson, '16, Elizabeth
McRea, '16, Edna Toland, '16, Jemima
Wenley, '16, and Leola Royce, '16, also
deserve particular mention for their
portrayal of various character parts.
A hit was scored by Julia Barks-
dale, '16, Bernice Hannan, '16, and
Nena McIntyre, '16, in their burnt-cork
specialty between the acts.
Of the eleven songs, which, with one
exception, were developed with elab-
orate chorus work, "I Know a Secret,"
a two-step love song by Martha
Gray, '16, and Ellen Sargeant, '16,
"Vengeance," a humorous satire by
Miss Gray and Helen Brander, '16,
"My Wonderful Dream Girl," by Flor-
ence Snyder, '16, and Altha Heftel-
bower, '16, and "Our Seniors," a local
topical song by Miss Gray and Miss
Sargeant, were probably the beat re-
ceived, though all created much en-
thusiasm,'

ip
r
r
1
i f
t
c
I
3
-4
t

Favor General Ballot-Day
Athletic Association
Publications

h
t
t

for Unioi
and

AWARD "M's"'FOR SYRACUSE MEE'

l,
p
e-

fered certain opinions and -recommen-
dations. It was the sense of the board
that such a general election should be
confined this year to the Union officers,
board of directors of the athletic as-

Proposed plans for a general cai
us election day came before
ie board of directors of the
hletic association at its meet'
g yesterday, and the board of-

I

COMMITTEE FAILS TO GET USE
OF WATERMAN GYM FOR DANCE

I
E

sociation, and members of 'he board
in control of student publications.

I i-

BC

OAT CLUB ARRANGES SPECIAL
PRE-HOLIDAY DANCING PARTY

s

Although the use of Waterman gym
could not be obtained for the staging
of the "All-Lit" dance, scheduled for
the first week after vacation, the com-
mittee in charge expects to be able to
provide dancing room for the probable
large numbers. Besides Barbour gym,
the committee expects to make use of
the parlors downstairs, placing the
orchestra between the gym and the
smaller room. In this way it is plan-
ned to take care of the crowd, which
is expected to .$be the largest of the
year, with the exception of the J-hop
attendance.
The committee is making arrange-
ments for special music. The tickets
will be on sale by the chairmen of the
class social committees of the literary
college immediately after the spring
vacation.

Members of the Boat club have ar-
ranged for a special pre-holiday par-j
ty to be held at the Union on the Wed-
nesday night before the spring vaca-
tion. Leroy J. Scanlon, '16L, has pro-
mised to feature some of the inter-
missions, and "Ike" Fisher will be on
hand with his banjorine and five- piece
orchestra.
H. J. Newland, '16, will act as chair-
man of the affair and Prof. R. W..Aig-
ler and Mrs. Aigler act as chaperons.
Pasteboards go on sale at the Union
counter tomorrow at one dollar each.
Decorations will be held over from the
B. V. D. party, and the new opera
music will be one of the features of

Y
tl
e
i
t
3

It was the further opinion of the
board that in so far as possible, and
according to the rules of these organi-
zations, the election should be under
the control of the student council. The
board advocated the enlargement of
the plan to include class and other
organizations in future years, provided
the plan works out well this year.
A resolution to the effect that the,
Syracuse outdoor track meet be con-
sidered the "big" meet, upon the basis
of which track "M's" be awarded, was
also passed by the board. Michigan
men winning first place in any events
of this meet will be. entitled to their.
letters, if the resolution is adopted by
the athletic board of control, with
whom the final decision rests.
Insignia, the exact nature of which
is to be determined by a committee,
was voted to the members of the rifle
team. It is probable that the men on
the team will be given their numerals.
The award for the winners in the
interclass basketball series wa. chang-
ed from a track shirt, as in former
years; to a jersey numeral sweater.

I

_I

'x
r

'

j

Professor Jesse Siddal Reeves, of
political science department, and 1
fessor Willis Gordon Stoner, of
Law School, will be the speakers at
banquet of the Indiana club at
Union April 6. "Indiana Lawyers
the subject chosen by Professor SI
er and Professor Reeves will talk
the constitution of Indiana. Additi
al speeches 'will be made by H.
Mead, '15L, H. G. Neff, '15L, and H.
Mueller, '15L, Mr. O. J. Stahl, of
school of music, has promised to p
the piano.
Election of officers will take pl
following the program. A thoroi
canvass of Indiana men has been
tempted and all such are urged to
present. Tickets are selling for 75c

?E

EEVES AND ST.
BEFORE INDI

The classical conference dr
large number of prominent tea
and professors, and interesting
lems were discussed. At this me
papers were also read on Bez
method of teaching Latin and the
gan manuscripts. All the cla
conference meetings are held in
upper lecture room of the Men
building.
The general program for the Sc
masters' club as well as the clan
club, for today, is as follows:
9:00 o'clock-General session,
ness meeting, U. H.
9:30 o'clock-General session.
(Continued on page 6.)

had hydropho-j

any canine
ardless of
eld in leash

I

I

It

the

program.

I

I.

I

E GREENHOUSE
NTD THAWS OUT

I

BASEBALL MEN WILL SUPERVISE
UNION SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE

I

I

on as the frost is out of the
work will be commenced on
idation of the newrgreeTihouse
s to be erected at the south-
ner gf the new science build-
greenhouse will be connected
e main building and will ex-
. for thirty feet. It will taper
height of two stories where it
e science building to one story
her end. It will be composed
entirely of glass and will be
ith many new specialties in
;ural equipment.

Will Make Tunnel Excavations Soon
Excavations for the tunnel, which is
to carry the heating pipes and feed
wires from the university heating plant
to the new Martha Cook dormitory on
South University avenue, will probably
begin next week. The tunnel will
commence between the old engineering
building, the engineering shops and
the physics building, and will be about
600 feet in length.

Varsity baseball will feature the
membership dance at the Union tomor-
row night, as a sequel to the Varsity
football affair held last Saturday. Ed-
mon P. McQueen, '15E, chairman, cap-
tain of this year's nine, Frank W. Shee-
hy, '15E, Charles W. Ferguson, '15L,
and Williams K. Niemann, '17, will act
as committeemen at the party.
The chaperons will be Postmaster
Horatio J. Abbott and Mrs. Abbott, and
Dr. Mahlon Sutton and Mrs. Sutton,
Tickets for the occasion ave now on
sale at the Union counter and are
nearly half sold.

Demand for All-Law Smoker Increases
Plans being pushed for the "all law"
smoker will take place in the near fu-
ture. There was some doubt as. to the
certainty of this event, since it was
rumored that the several separate
class events made it seem advisable
not to crowd the social schedule. This
however has been discredited and the.
consensus of opinion in the whole law
school is strong for the big event.

I

I

Ray J. Mills Reported Much Improved
Ray 3. Mills, '16L, has practically
recovered from an attack of iuto-in-
toxication which has confined him in
Dr. J. F. Breakey's hospital since Sun-
day. He will probably be discharged;
within the next few days.

CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS HOLD
MEETING IN NEWBERRY Hl

1
l

Delay Naming Class Honor Committees.
Although the freshman class of the
engineering college voted Wednesday
to support the proposed plan for the
discussion of an honor system in the
college, no appointments have been
announced by either the president of
the first year class, or the other class
presidents, for places upon the com-
mittee. Names for the various com-
mittees are 'being considered by the
presidents however, and probably will
be ready for publication tomorrow.

I--, -

I

i,

Christian Science society of the Un
versity of Michigan held it's regul
open meeting in Newberry hall at 7:
o'clock last night. Talks were give
by various members concerning the
work on the Michigan campus with r
gard to Christian Science.
The society holds regular ope
meetings on the first Thursday of eac
month, to which members of the fa
ulty and students are invited. On th
third Thursday of the month the reg
ular business meeting of the society
held. This meeting is of a purely bus
mess character and is open to men
bees only.

t

a

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be ready for publication tomorrow. bers only.

AR

U

+- ----MORE WIT !-

15cl

-MORE JOY!i

THE OPERA NUMBER OF
THE GARGOYLE
WILL BE ON SALE ON THE CAMPVS AT NOON

SPECIAL CONTRIDUTIONS $Y
M. C. Wier
Roy M. Parsons

H. R. Schradzkil
E. S. Everett

H. B. Carpenter
Harold P. Scott

Harold Upjohn
D. T. Houffman

Allan Honey
C. M. Burns

Fritz Bade
F. B. Webster

-U"QEP t-

EST

-1

4 LA

1r7(: 1"li ,

a

15C

BREEZIEST!I

-APAJ&x A 6-

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