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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1914 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y PRESIDENTI

dI Express
to

NCE

reduction in
rning body as
1 while. This
nion of those
it reached by
ly felt that
been given a
to prove its
as to future
rs the repre-
classes was
this arrange-
mbers of the
suit of an in-
rear, the size
down by giv-
nly two men,
ssors to some
ran out. As
only 16 mem-
resident, said
n't know how
We haven't
o try out the
it to be more
to be able to
Lout wasting

Although final arrangements for the
assembling of students on Convocation
Day, October 16, have not yet been
made, the details of the program were
given out by Pres. Harry B. Hutchins
yesterday. The program, which will
not exceed one hour in length, will be
as follows:
Organ Prelude-Prof. A. A. Stanley.
Invocation.
"Ann Arbor, 'Tis of Thee I Sing."
Convocation Address-Dean Victor
C. Vaughan.
"Yellow and Blue."
Benediction.
Organ Postlude-Prof. A. A. Stanley.
The words of all songs will be print-
ed on the programs.
All members of the faculty and of
the graduate department will appear
in academic costume.
In the evening following the exer-
cises, President Hutchins and the
Board of Regents will tender a recep-
tion in Barbour gymnasium at 8:00
o'clock to the university senate and
the new members of the faculty.
WILL RECOM1EEND STUDENTS
FOR SUIJIMER SCHOOL DEGREES
At the first meeting of the faculty
of the literary department tomorrow,
those degrees earned during summer
school will be recommended to the
Board of Regents. The library com-
mittee will be appointed, and the two
members of the senate council from
the literary department will be elected.

' , CP~01l'( .
wo ROS

Our custom tailored
clothes are made to your
individual order by
.d. V. Price & Co.
because there are no other
tailors who give so much for
the money in style, fit and
service-value.
Let us show you their woolens
and fashions.
T: E BETTER CLOT'"S STORE
123 E. LIBERTY ST.

9 ALUMNI SERVE
AS MI'SSIONARIES
China Has Largest Number With
25 Men Working There-.
India Second
With 21
MORE ARE PLEDGED TO SERVE
Michigan has 96 alumni serving as
missionaries in 25 foreign countries.
Of these, 25 are -in China, 12 are in
India, 21 in other parts of Asia, and
tile others are scattered over Africa,
South America, Southern Europe and
Mexico.
About 46 alumni who have served
as missionaries are now living in
various parts of this country. The
oldest active missionary who has been
in continuous service since the mis-
sion work began, is Dr. Henry Laning,
'63M, of Osaga, Japan.
Great interest is being shown by
university students in the- work of
these foreign missions. At the meet-
ing of the foreign missions delegates

at Kansas City this year, several of
the 60 Michigan delegates 'pledged
themselves to serve in foreign mis-
sions if called upon.
The Busrah campaign, carried on
last winter, was conducted by the uni-
versity Y. M. C. A., and netted about
$3,500. This amount will be used to-
gether with contributions from other
universities for the upkeep of the
mission at Busrah, Arabia, where
30,000 patients are given medical
treatmenttyearly, and where Amer-
icans disseminate education and re-
ligion among the natives.
President Emeritus James Burrill
Angell, commented upon the mission-
ary work of Michigan students and
alumni as follows:
"I am much gratified to see that the
Student Volunteer Band each year
publishes' the list of our missionary
representatives on the foreign fields.
It serves to perpetuate and strengthen
the ties by which they are bound to
each other and the university. It
will brighten their lives by a sense
of companionship and of devotion to
their common Master. We desire to
assure them that it helps to keep
fresh in our hearts our memory of
them, and our interest in their work."

! f1

s. Sinc
n, the st
y: "rt
shown
ers com

e the sponsibility and the office is more im-1
Land- portant. Besides, there is always more
efficiency in a smaller group."
think J. S. Books, '15L: "The new system
its is much to be praised"
e to A. W. Mothersill, '15: "The effi-
r to ciency of the student council has been
ulty, increased. There is greater discus-
o ar- sion, and more individual opinion ex-
n of pressed. The attendance is markedly
Since better than formerly, when members
> go seem to have left -it to the others to
large transact the council's business."
K. S. Baxter, '15E: "New system is

CHEMISTY ENROLLMENT BIG;
LABORATORIES INADEQUATE
Considerable difficulty is being ex-
perienced in accommodating students
in the chemistry laboratories, due to
the fact that the enrollment in the
general chemistry course is much
greater than that of last year. Al-
though it was expected that the elim-
ination of the qualitative chemistry
3A from the requirement for engi-
neers would lessen the congestion and
aid general laboratory conditions, the
increased enrollment in the general
chemistry courses has made this year's
registration figures about the same as
those of last year. It is- estimated
that, had the 3A course not been
dropped, it would have been neces-
sary to refuse at least one hundred of
the registrations because of lack of
accommodations.
WIRELESS STATION TO DELAY
OPENING SEVERAL WEEKS
Because of the necessity of making
several repairs and installations the
university wireless station will not be
opened until the end of this month.
A regular operator has been appointed
and he will in all probability have two
assistants.
DR. CUMMINGS TO SPEAK
AT MAJESTIC ON "BOOZE"
Today's "Y" Majestic meeting will
be addressed by Dr. H. H. Cummings,
of the university health service, who
will speak on "Booze." Moving pic-
tures will be shown at 6:10, address
at 6:30. The meeting will close at
7:30 so that all may attend other lec-
tures of the evening.

JEWISH STUDENT MAGAZINE
TO APPEAR SOON ON CAMPUS
"Menorah Journal," a quarterly
magazine, edited and published in
New York City, will make its initial
appearance on the campus in about
two weeks. Mr. Henry Hurwitz of
Haryard, chancellor of the Intercol-
legiate Menorah association, has been
appointed managing editor of the new.
publication. It is planned to make
Menorah Journal a representative
magazine for all Jewish matters in the
United States, for which there has
been a pressing need in the past. The
board of contributing editors will in-
clude such famous men as Louis
Brandeis, Dr. J. L. Magnus, Jacob
H. Schiff, Dr. Israel Friedlander, Rab-
bi Stephen S. Wise and Prof. Max L.
Margolis.
Besides being devoted to special ar-
ticles by its able staff of contributing
editors, Menorah Journal will have a
special college feature, a whole page
being reserved for news from all the
colleges where Menorah societies have
been established. This means that 30
of the largest eastern and western in-
stitutions will be heard from with the
additional prospect of five more col-
leges whose membership applications
are now before the directors of the
Intercollegiate Menorah association.
RHETORIC BUILDING HAS
NEW 1IPROVEMENTS ADDED
The rhetoric building, to which was
added a new roof during the summer,
is again having improvements made.
This time Professor Brumm's room on
the first floor is being redecorated. The
library on the second floor will also
be freshly cleaned, painted and re-
decorated.

G

WHITNEY THEATRE To it
ATRE October 13
The Sensational Success of the Season
Brining Up Father
GEORGE McMANUS' ORIGINAL CREATION

711;

The Newest of
the New

M: "Better, easier to
'16: "General run of

'15A: "

n view of the
on with the
wish to com-

The

World is Full

of Tailors
AND SO IS ANN ARBOR

+I~

I

am no Better than the Rest

YET
I am no Worse than the Rest

31,E:'

Any Person can be Satisfied with his Ability, but what
aim at is the
Satisfaction of My Customers

I

:TS

My endeavor to please is your Guarantee for a Perfect Fitting

SVIT

OR

OVERCOAT

I MU .T EAT, and in order to eat I must sell suits and over-
coats. I expect to make a small profit off the garment I make
for you, but I do not expect to get rich or to maintain auto-
mobiles from this effort.

RESULTS: 1 eat, you wea
feel satisfied, and so am 1.

kr p

good clothes. I please you, you
I save you money, you save my
deduction, and I want to work

stomach.
for you.

This is

my logical4

$16.00

Up is

My Clothes Conversation

117 mast

J

AC

K

GREY

Wh:n It Works
4'3,2 ow

ton

THE TAILOR.

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