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March 24, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Why do you suppose
we talk Style?
Why do you suppose
we hammer on pat-
terns?
Why do you suppose we
constantly claim there
areno other clothes
which equal ours?
Why is it to the young
man's advantage to trade
with us?>
A visit to our shop and a
glance at our Hart, Schaff-
ner & Marx Style ideas
will answer every inquiry.
Come in.
In our exhibits of Quality
Haberdashery you will find
- what's proper and best.

iiht Hart Scaiffner & Marx

In

I"Y"WILL SEND OUT
DEPUTATION TEAS
Three Boys' Conferences Will Be on
Week's Schedule Followed
by Students
'ITO BE WIND-UP OF YEAR'S WORK
With three deputation teams going
out into the field Friday afternoon, the
University Y. M. C. A. will wind-up
this year's conference-work. The teams
wil go to Pontiac, Reading and Tecum-
I seh, where boys' conferences will be
held. The Oakland County or Pontiac
conference will be the largest of the
three, about 300 boys taking part. A
team of five men will go to Pontiac,
for this conference, the members being,
Lewis Reinmann, '17L, R. E. Flynn, '17,
W. 0. R. Johnson, '17, C. C. Bailey, '17,
and W. H. Tinker.
Phil. C. Lovejoy, '16, W. R. Hunt,.'16,
J. W. Poe, '16, A. H. Chute, '16, and
C. H. Gernert, '17, will make up the
team that will go to the conference at
Reading, Hillsdale County. The meet-
ings at Reading will be held in three
different churches and the men will
give religious talks to the boys with
a view of showing them what college
men think of religion. In addition to
his they will take hikes, and give them
athletic talks. The prime motive of
the deputation teams is to give the
younger boys an idea of the worth of a
clean moral character.
Earl Pinney, '16, winner of the State
Peace contest, will represent the Y. M.
C. A. at the Tecumseh conference, and
will be the chief speaker at that
meeting..
KENTUCKY CLUB TO VIEW GAME
Plan to Support Team in Connection
with Dixie Club
Coach Lundgren's baseball squad
will meet Kentucky State on the lat-
ter's field on the southern trip April
10, but the Wolverines will have a big
section of rooters ,numbered among
those attending the game, as the Ken-
tucky club will be present en.masse.
Arrangements have been made by
the southern organization to make the
homeward trip by the way of Lexing-
ton at the time of spring vacation, thus
enabling the members to witness the
Michigan baseball aggregation in ac-
tion, and to lend encouragement to the
proteges of Coach Lundgren. They
have also completed arrangements
whereby the baseball squad will ride
from Cincinnati to Lexington on the
private car chartered by the Dixie
club:
The special car is not limited nec-
essarily to the members of the organ-
ization, as others who wish to make te
trip south spring vacation, and whc
are desirous of seeing the baseball
game at Lexington, can make arrange-
ments by calling F. B. Thompson a
phone 18.

HEALTH SERVICE ISSUES LIST
161 Students Treated in Hospital;
One Fatality
Figures given out by the university
health service staff yesterday show that
a total of 161 students have been con-
fined in the various wards of the uni-
versity hospitals up to the present
time this year. Of the entire number,
but one case was fatal. The statistics
of the more common ailments follow:
Disease No. of Cases
appendicitis.....................19
Chicken Pox.....................4
Diphtheria ....................... 7
Fractures ........................7
Arm . ................... 3
Leg ...................2
Skull .................... 1
Nose.....................1
Heart Condition .................. 4
Infection Extremities.............5
Jaundice......................... 4

Mull
Mas
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Peni
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Sint
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Scai
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Sto

Lips .........................
toid operation...............
sies......................
[ritis....................
is M edia ......................
urisy ........................
nmonia.....................
tonitis (death) .... ...........
chopathic.
isy........................
usitis .......................
eptococcus throats...........
rlet fever......................
all Pox................. ......
ne in Ureter................

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10
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1
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6
6
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A REALLY GRE AT MEN'S HAT STORE

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Tuberculosis.....................12
Tonsilitis . ..................... 11
Hal H. Smith, '95, to Speak at Banquet
Detroit alumni will hold a luncheon
at the Statler hotel, Detroit, at noon
today. Hal H. Smith, '95, will speak
on "The Man Out of a Job." Next
week's speech will be by O. C. Marck-
wardt, of the rhetoric department.
Ivey-Walker Engagement Announced
Mr. and Mrs. Frank S. Walker an-
nounce the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Stella Orser Walker to Mr. Paul
W. Ivey, assistant in the economics de-
partment. The couple will be mkrried
on the 19th of next June.

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Millions of expren"ced smokers find the cigarettes they
roll for themselves from pure, ripe "Bull" Durham tobacco
better suited to their taste and ore Ask for FREE
satisfactory than any they buy ach eAoFPapers.
ready-made. The rich, fresh ra-fr ith each Sc sack.
grance and smooth, mello flavor
of "Bull Durham hand-.made
cigarettes afford healthful enjoy-
ment and lasting satisfaction. fr n
Get "the Makings "todayv .
roll your own."
showin a i
way toP Y 'joUr >
0-nd 3 FLett. 1m ep /
of C4, ~'i" .'1 h
m a ldUn ite d ia e 1 " ' ! r ( C t
ham, N. C. xoo
THE AMERICAN TCO ACCO CO.

Lutz Clothing Store,
The Home of Hart, Schaffner & Marx

.1

RE~~TP SCOLME
Ry P. Blake, Former Varsity Athlete
Presents New Trophy for
Half-Milers
CPECT LARGEST ENTRY LIST
Another cup has been added to the
ig list of prizes for the annual in-
scholastic meet, scheduled for, the
ter part of May on Ferry field. Ray
Blake, who competed for the Var-
y on the track two and three years
;o, has put up a cup to be given' to
e man whoubreaks the Ferry field
erscholastic half mile record.
Blake offered a cup last year to the
hlete who broke the quarter mile
cord, and the cup was carried away.
appears likely, however, that the'
esent cup will remain in Ann Arbor
r some time. The interscholastic
lf mile record is a trifle faster than'
e Varsity record of 1:57 3-5, set by
il Jansen last year. Any prep
hiool athlete who can break the pres-
t record should be entitled to the
p.
Although entries to the interscho-
tic meet have not been mailed in yet,
:ications are that the contests will
tract more prep school athletes than
.y meet in the history of the univer-
y. Inquiries for entry blanks have
ne from schools all over the country,
d it is probable that schools hun-
eds of miles away will send athletes
the competition.
That the new plan for a second
ass of events for the smaller schools
ill prove popular, is evidenced by the
amber of minor state high schools
hiich have signified their intention to
on hand when the first race is
lled. Every one of the twelve cups
mounced as prizes in this class have
en presented by local merchants and
mpus honorary societies.
ERIOUS DIFFICULTY INVOLVED
IN PURCHASING OF CHEMICALS

THE SHORT STORY
By E. A. Cross
(8Q8.3 C95)
Magazine readers who skim through
a dozen or more short stories a week,
with little or no knowledge of their
technique will welcome this attempt
on the part of Professor Cross to ac-
quaintsthenaverage readeriwith, the
methods and' the materials ofj the
writer of short fiction. Sometimes,
not often, a, collegian succeeds in writ-.
ing a book which 'undertakes to' give
technical knowledge to the lay-man
in such a manner that the reading is
not dull and tiresome. This book
written by a professor of English and
literature in the state teachers college
of Colorado, aims to help the reader,
who enjoys the short story, get at the
meaning of the story through an under-
standing of its construction.
According to the auth'or, a short
story is in most cases a development
of some theme. Chapters on plot,
management 'of materials, and devel-
opment of theme take up a good part
of the work. Maupassant's "The Piece
of String" is analyzed for the purpose
of showing how the French short
story master developed his plot, while
in the last chapter the author presents
a questionaire on 0. Henry's "The
Whirligig of Life," cites the story, an-
swers the questons and then'proceeds
to show how 0. Henry might have
written his stories. The latter part
of the volume is made up of a collec-
tion of typical short stories, including
several by such modern authors as
Jack London and Conan Doyle.

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DANCE WILL FOLLOW GIVING
OF DEUTSCHER VEREIN PLAY
"Einer Muss Heiraten" is the title
of a play which will be presented by
the Deutscher Verein at 8:00 o'clock
Friday evening in Sarah Caswell & n-
gell hall. After the play, a dance will
be held in Barbour gym. All faculty
members are expected to attend, and
all students of German are invited to
the affair, which will be free.
The cast for the play has been se-
lected as follows: Wilhelm, 1 tarold
Sherman, '17; Jakob, Bernhard Daw-
son, '16; Gertrud, Ruth Weltmann, '15;

Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
I wish to make a few prognostica-
tions providing the "Straight" five-mile
bill is eventually inscribed in the stat-
ute books of the State of Michigan. The
saloons must go; at least five miles
from Ann Arbor. The most suitable
place would be either up or down the
Huron. Eliminating the possibility of
a route provided by either the D. U. R.
or the Taxi-Cab Co., we have recourse
to the following:-Steam or gasoline
yachts could leave - Tessemer's boat
house regularly. One objection is that
if the fire-water dispensaries are up
the river, a series of locks would have
to be constructed at Barton Dam. This
expense alone would be prohibitive.
Besides, the marine engineering de-
partment is not in the ship-building
business as yet. The Aero club could
furnish a flying machine; but this
would only be suitable for daylight
excursions, while the biggest demand
would be during the nocturnal por-
tion of the 24 hours. The club could
furnish a dirigible of the Zeppelin
type, providing the oratory depart-
ment could supply the hot air.
The above solutions seem entirely
inadequate to meet the situation, so
finally I offer the only alternative,
namely; move the university five
miles from the saloons, a preferable.
location being on the road to Ypsi.
These are mere suggestions and are
offered as a panacea for a possible
dilemma. I do not know what course
will ultimately be pursued; but as for
me I'll take grape juice.
'. F. EARL LOUDY, '15E.

'U

TA~sk9E

S--
ai
give away F RE E -, r

SITCUT TO YOUR OWN MEASURE
EVERY SUITN MADE TO YOUR ORDER

A WORD OF INTRODUCTION
Our Spring line of woolens is now ready for your inspection. You are invited to call and look them
over whether you purchase or not. We believe we have the largest assortment of late patterns to
be found anywhere. Th.writer has taken measures for Made-to-Measure Clothes for over twenty
years, and can assure anyone who wishes to take advantage of low prices on fine tailoring that they
will be perfectly satisfied. I fit coats before they are finished, and give the same high-class service
you would expect to pay more money for.

Th
wil

m

OUR SPECIAL OFFER
Enables you to share in the profits of our Tailoring line without being
under any obligation whatever. The Raincoats, Panama Hats and Palm
Beach Suits which we give with our Made-to-Measure suits are all. the
best of merchandise, and would cost you the money anywhere. Of course
we get them wholesale, and that is how we are able to give them with our
Made-to-Measure suits. REMEMBER-A $6.oo Raincoat or Palm Beach
Suit FREE with every $18.oo, $20.oo or $22.50 suit; or an $8.oo Panama
Hat or Palm Beach Suit FREE with every $25.00, $27.50 or $30.00 suit.

A60 Raincoat or Palm Beach Suit
with every $18.00, $20.01 or $22.50 Suit
$8.00 Panama flat or Palm Beach Suit
With every $25.00. $27.50 or $30.00 Suit

Our Goat Fronts
are unbreakable, and
retain their shape. -
Our garments are
made inesuch a way
that when you wear
them you will be con-
vinced that no one
can make them better
either inside or out-
side.

AN ART IN CLOTHES MAKING

We make clothes to FIT. The shoulders are per-
feet, the collar sets to the neck, the lapels hang
smooth and graceful, the whole contour of the
garment gives you a feeling of ease and satisfac-
tion. There's an artistic tone in clothes made by
us that few tailors equal, and that you cannot find
in ready-made clothes at all.

fficulties, incurred by the present
have been experienced by the pur-
ing department of the university
he securing of chemicals, drugs,
laboratory materials. The price
[emicals has increased to such an
nt that they are almost unobtain-
. Carbolic acid alone has -ad-
ed in price almost 1,000 per cent in
last few months. Cover glasses
microscopes are especially hard to
and the present supply is almost
austed. This scarcity, as well .as
high price of materials, may in
effect the scientific departments

ORDER YOUR SPRING SUIT NOW

Palm Beach Suits

Will e all the Rage
this Summer. Get one

FREE

Luise, Mildred Nuechterlein,
B. Wahr, '11, will direct the
of the play.

'15. F.
staging

522

Holmes Taxi Co.
"We'll be there"

522

ServiceI

ACTOR YAl
W. W. MANN, Proprietor

HAT
NN ARBOR, MICWH
11.8 E. HURON ST.

Near Allenel Hotel

Fair Treatment and Good

are what makes a satisfied customer.
Both are yours by calling 15. tt

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