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March 23, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-03-23

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EDAILY
MORNING
$1.00 LOCAL

fhe

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE
NO0W
$1.00

124. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 23, 1915. PRICE FIVE CENTS,

i

PARTIN UNION
RI UNDE.CIDED
hairman Baxter Wishes Men i TODAY
Tenor Voices to Come 1 Adelphi House of Representatives
Out for Opera meets in Adelphi rooms, 7:30 o'clock.
PAaMinnesota club meets at Union 7:36

_ _ __ i

ISSUE INVITATIONS
TO STATE TEAC HERS

ENTER RESIDENCE
Home of C. F. Meyers Robbed at Same
Time as that of University
Professor's

Superintendents and Principals
Gather Here for Short
Term Institute

Will

!ole
CHANGE MATIEE PERFORMANCE
FROM FRIDAY UNTIL SATURDAY
Have Heavy Seat Sale, but Many Good
Tickets Remain for Most
Appearances
Kenneth S. Baxter, '15E, has issued
a call for tryouts to compete for the
part of Dick, in the opera, "All That
Glitters." This cast position was left
open by the resignation of George P.
McMahon, '16, and has not been defi-
nitely filled since that time. The part
is a so-called straight role, and candi-
dates should have tenor voices, as sev-
eral of the chief songs are tenor solos
to be sung by Dick. Baxter wishes all
aspirants for the place to confer with
him as soon as possible, as but little
time remains to acquaint another man
with the 'role.
By an announcement made yester-
day, the date of the matinee has been
changed from Friday to Saturday af-
ternoon, as the committee thought that
the latter day would be a better time
for the performance. At the seat sale
on Saturday to the members of the
cast, chorus, orchestra and committee,
$1,008.00 worth of tickets were dispos-
ed of. There are still a number of
good seats left, especially for the Wed-
nesday night and Saturday afternoon
shows, with a smaller number for
Thursday and Saturday nights. The
majority of the Friday night tickets
have been sold.
The cast, chorus and orchestra held
a joint rehearsal last-night and Direc-
tor Sanger devoted much of his atten-
tion to whipping the musicians into
shape, particularly in the finales.
Work on the properties is progress-
ing rapidly. The auto which is to be
used in the first act arrived from New
York yesterday, and the rest of the
furnishings for the beauty parlor are
being put in readiness.
PLAN TO STAGE CREW RACES
AT UNION BOAT CLUB REGATTA
W. B. Palmer,'15, and D. R. Ballentine,
'16, Resign as Officers of Union
Organization
Championship crew racing between
the Detroit and Grand Rapids boat
clubs has been promised as one of the
events for the annual regatta of the
Union Boat club, on Barton pond, May
29. W. B. Palmer, '15, has resigned
as second ensign of the club, because
of pressure of studies, and his place
will bg filled at a meeting of Boat club
officers to be held at the Union at 7:00
o'clock tonight.
Letters from Secretary Conlin of the
Grand Rapids aquatic organization
have definitely prmised participation
in the eight-oared shell race, and Sec-
retary Duffield of the Detroit club has
written letters almost as favorable, to
Harold J. Smith, '16E, general chair-
man of the regatta.
At a meeting of the regatta chair-
men at the Union Sunday, it was de-
cided that at least three races should
be open to students only, that long dis-
tance swims should be omitted, and
that cups and medals be given for tro-
phies in most of the events. A definite
list of events will be announced after
a similar nm eeting next Sunday.
D. R. Ballentine, '16, has resigned
his office as assistant to the general
chairman of the regatta, and his place
will be occupied by William Lamor-
eaux, '16L. t The program committee
will be as follows: E. W. Bisbee, '16,
chairman, McDonald Reed, '16E, R. M.
McKean, '16, and Hugo A. Braun, '16.
The judges and prizes committee which

is now complete is made up of S. T.
Steen, '16E, chairman, G. A. Howland,
'17, and J. W. Thomas, '16.
POLE VAULT WINS TRACK MEET
FOR FRESH LIT CLASS TEAM
When Scott finished second in the
pole vault Saturday afternoon at the
"Dub" meet, the fresh lits won the in-
terclass meet, these three points rais-4
ing their total to 20. ,The soph medics
with whom they were tied,.remained at

o'clock.
Professor A. E. White speaks on "The
Influence of Heat Treatment and
Composition on Copper and Brass"
in. the chemistry amphitheater, 4:15
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Classical club meets in room A of
Memorial hall, 4:00 o'clock.
Intercollegiate Socialist society meets
in Adelphi rooms, 7:30 o'clock.
Tau Beta Pi dinner at Union, 6:00
o'clock.
HUGHITT MAKES INITIAL CALL
FOR ALL-FRESH NINE TRYOUTS
Coach "Tommy" Hughitt, of the All-
Fresh baseball team has issued his
first call for candidates for the year-
ling nine all, tryouts being summoned
to appear at Waterman gym at 7:0 a
o'clock tomorrow night.
DEBATESPREPAE
FOR, FRIDAY BATTLE
Professor Trueblood Declares Varsity
Men Are Improving
Rapidly
NEGATIVE TEAM TO GET TRIP
In speaking of the preparations un-
der way for the Mid-west league de-
bate with Illinois next Friday night,
Prof. T. C. Trueblood, of the oratory
department, yesterday stated, "The
teams are making good progress and
we think highly of their ability. They
are developing rapidly, and, by the
time of the debate, we expect to have
two very strong teams."
Final practices have begun,'and the
instructor who supervised the work
last night' expressed himself as well
pleased with the showing. The ques-
tion for debate, as to whether labor
unions should be exempt from con-
struction as combinations in restraint
of trade, is a timely one, and of such
a character as to appeal not only to
the student body, but also to a popular
audience.
Michigan will meet worthy foes in
their opponents this year, both Mr.
C. W. Woolbert, professor of oratory
at Illinois, and H. M. Houghton, who
is drilling the Wisconsin debaters, be-
ing graduates of the university and
versed in Michigan oratory. Both ob-
tained M.A. degrees under Professor
Trueblood.
This debate marks the opening of
the new Mid-west debating league
which was formed last May between
Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan. In'
the coming debate, it has been arrang-
ed that the negative teams of the three
universities shall meet their adversa-
ries on foreign ground while the af-.
firmative teams are to remain at home.
Hence Michigan's negative will go to
Wisconsin, and the affirmative will
be pitted against Illinois' negative
here. Wisconsin's negative will travel
to Illinois.
CHICAGO ASSOCIATION ISSUES
STEVENSON MEMORIAL NUMBER
Chicago alumni have issued a special
memorial number of the Michigan bul-
letin in honor of David F. Stevenson,
'08. Mr. Stevenson died on March 1.
In the special bulletin is printed an
account of the meeting held in mem-
ory of Stevenson at which messages
were read from President-Eneritus
James B. Angell, President Harry B.
Hutchins and others. Several speeches

were given by members of the Chicago
association. Mr. Stevenson was killed
while riding a spirited horse.
Council Works on Election Day Plan
Student councilmen will meet at
7:00 o'clock tonight in their room in
the north wing of University hall, this
being one of the regular sessions. The
more important matters before the
council now, are the working out of the
plan for a Campus Election day, and
the collection of the indemnity for
Russel C. Jacobs, ex-'18.

TESTS TO ACCOMPANY LECTURES SET VALUE OF LOSS AT $1,000

Invitations to the Short Term State
Institute, to be held under the auspices
of the educational department, March
29 to April 1, have been sent to su-
perintendents and principals in every
village and city in Michigan. While no
authoritative statement as to the at-
tendance can be given at this time, the
responses which have come from all
sections of the state indicate that this
newest venture of the regents to bring
the university nearer the people will
be a decided success.
The work of the institute will con-
sist, besides lectures and conferences,
in making tests and in analyzing edu-
cational methods, and will be under
the direct supervision of Prof. E. L.
Thorndyke, of Columbia University,
Prof. L. D. Coffman, of the Universityr
of Illinois, and Mr. S. A. Courtis, of
Detroit. All the principal meetings of
the institute will be held in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall and will be open to
the general student body.
In addition to tie principals and su-
perintendents many teachers through-
out the state have signified their in-
tention of coming, as the spring vaca-
tion of the majority of schoolsoccurs
the same week as the institute. The
program for Monday, March 29, fol-
lows:
9:00 o'clock, lecture-"Supervision,
Its Nature and Scope," Professor Coff-
man.
10:00 o'clock, lecture-"The Pre-
scriptive Function of the School Su-
pervisor," Professor Coffman.
11:00 o'clock-lecture and demon-
stration of scales for measuring pr'og-
ress in reading, Professor Thorndyke.
2:00 o'clock-Experiments with scal-
es and tests for reading, Professor
Thorndyke..
3:00 o'clock-Round table for dis-
cussion and criticism of reading tests,
Professor Thorndyke.
4:00 o'clock-Conference, Professor
Coffman.
ARCHITECTS AND SECOND YEAR
LITS WIN SEMI-FINAL TILTS
Five Teams Enter Final Competition
in Class Basketball
Tourney,
One closely contested, and one lop-
sided game, brought the interclass bas-
ketball series nearer to completion
last evening. The arhitects succeed-
ed in nosing out the senior laws, 30-
24, while the other legal team, the jun-
iors, lost to the soph lits, 43-16.
With the exception of the dent team,
the fives which are eligible for the fin-
al series are determined. They are
the soph lits, fresh lits, junior engi-
neers, architects and senior laws. A
game tonight between the fresh and
junior dents will decide which of these
teams will compete in the final series.
In last night's game, the senior laws
threatened the architects throughout
the contest, being but one point be-
hind at the end of the first half. A ten-
dency to shoot from the mddle of the
floor nearly defeated the men from the
engineering building. The score:
Architects (30) Senior laws (24)
Jameson........F.... .... Reid
Hickey.........F......McClelland
Meibeyer......... C...... ..Carlson
Holt ..............G......... Kerwin
Cobagen..........G........ Goldstick
Baskets , from field-Jameson 5,
Hickey 3, Meibeyer 5, McClelland 5,
Kerwin 2, Goldstick 3; baskets from
foul-Jameson 4, McClelland 4.
Completely romping away from the
junior laws, and nearly tripling their
score, the soph lits were never in dan-
ger of losing. Bradbeer scored 10 field

baskets for the second year men. The
score:
Soph lits (43) Junior laws (16)
Perry........... F...... Melanephy
Stevens.. ..... F.......... Milroy
Bradbeer......... C........... Morse
Brownell.. ...... G. .....Van Aken
Scott..........G.. Cohen, Russell
Baskets from field-Perry 5, Milroy
2, Bradbeer 10, Van Aken 1, Melanephy
3, Morse 1, Scott 2; baskets from foul
-Morse 5; Perry 5.

Prof. John G. Winter, of the Greek
and Latin departments was robbed
Sunday afternoon when burglars en-
ered his residence on Forest avenue
and made away with a large amount of
jewelry and silverware.
The house was entered by the front
door which was "jimmied" open ap-
parently with much difficulty. The
robbery occurred while Professor Win-
ter and Mrs. Winter were out to tea,
and was not discovered until they re-
turned home late in the evening. The
residence of C. F. Meyers was entered
and robbed about the same time as the
Winter house. Jewelry and silverware
were stolen at the Meyers residence
also, and it is thought by the police
authorities that the same burglars en-
tered both houses.
While the amount of the stolen pro-
perty has not been definitely estimated,
the police authorities think that it will
amount to about $1,000. Every effort is
being made by Chief of Police J. T.
Kenny to locate the robbers, but no
clue was left by the criminals by which
they might be apprehended.
DISCUSSION OF STRAIGHT BILL
SCA DULED FOR NEXT FORUM
Y. M. C. A. and Honor Societies Will le
Minor Topics for Leaders
to Wrestle With
Because of the intense interest
shown by the student body, the ques-
tion, "Is the Adoption of the Straight
Bill Desirable?" is scheduled for the
topic at the meeting of the Forum at
the Union Thursday night. The sub-
ject, "Has the Michigan Unions a Func-
tion on the Campus, and Is It Fulfill-
ing It Satisfactorially?" which was set
for this week's discussion, was post-
poned unil later.
By the visit to Lansing last week
of the delegation of students,-business
and faculty men, the agitation around
the campus for the banishment of the
saloons in Ann Arbor came to a head.
With the possible exception of the
summer baseball question, it is felt
that this topic will be of more general
interest than any previous Forum
subject
Although the main topic of the eve-
ning has not yet been exhausted at
any meeting, two more minor subjects
have been announced. They are the
following: "Is the Y. M. C. A. Per-
forming Its Function on the Campus
Satisfactorily?" and "Is the Present
System of Elections to Honor So-
cieties (i. e., Where Selection Is Based
on Scholarship) Satisfactory?"
DETROIT Y. M. C. A. TO WELCOME
UPPERCLASS SOCIAL WORKERS
From 25 to 50 students, who are
either juniors ' or seniors and who
have intentions of doing some kind of
religious or social work, will be en-
tertained by the Detroit Y. M. C. A. at
a conference to be held Saturday'and
Sunday, March 27 and 28. Saturday
will be spent in pointing out to the
visitors the interesting parts of the
city. On Sunday, the Y. M. C. A. of De-
troit will furnish an entertainment.
Those who desire to attend the con-
ference should give their names to
the university Y.M. C. A. authorities
some time before Thursday. Outside
of the fare to Detroit and back the trip
will be free, as the Detroit Y. M. C. A.
will furnish ample accommodations.
REV. TATLOCK GIVES LENTEN
VESPER TALK THIS AFTERNOON
As the fifth of a series of six Lenten
vesper talks being given on Tuesday
fternoons during Lent, the Rev. Henry

Tatlock will speak at 4:30 o'clock this
afternoon in St. Andrew's church on
the general subject, "Characteristics of
the Four Gospels."
Tomorrow night at 7:30 o'clock in
St. Andrew's church, the Rev. William
0. Raymond of the English department
will deliver an address on the general
subject, "Types of Religious Experi-
ence," devoting his discourse to a
development of a specal type of in-
dividual. The general public is in-
vited to hear both speakers.

FARREL D I LAY SUA
OU12,) OR ODAY'IRAVTI'CE
Coach Farrell, of the Varsity track
squad, announced definitely yesterday,
that all candidates for the Drake re-
lay teams, will work out on Ferry
field this afternoon.
rhe other men will, remain jnside.
and there is a strong possibility that
those interested in the leaps will not
make their appearance outside for
some time, as the ground is in no con-
dition as yet. However, the coach
stated that it was becoming imnperative
that the milers and hialf-rnilers should
become familiar with the outside con-
ditions because of the Drake relays.
Summer Session Announcements Out
Summer session announcements are
off the press and are being sent out in
large numbers this week. The an-
nouncement features the fact that stu-
dents can complete a regular four-year
course in three years by taking three
summer sessions, while law students
are able to complete their course in
two regular years and three
summer sessions. T!e Helen 17. New-
berry residence hall, which will be
open for summer session women, is de-
scribed in the announcement.
TALCOTT WLLIMS
LAUD0S NEWSPAPER

lPulitzer School of Jouriatlisil
Credits Press for Size of
British Army

Head

RESPO N SiBLE FOR NEITTRAILITY
"England has been able to raise
3,000,000 volunteers for the present
war, and to place one-third of these
in the battle field already, solely
through the efforts of the newspaper,"
said Talcott Williams in his lecture be-
fore the journalistic classes yesterday
a fternoon. "The combined efforts of
the government and of individuals
could not have accomplished this enor-
mous feat, which the press was able to
accomplish in a comparatively short
time."
Professor Williams is head of the
l'ulitzer school of journalism at Co-
lumbia University, and in this capaci-
ty is well able to judge the merits of
the journalistic courses as taught in
the universities. He brought out the
fact that. the present day newspaper
man should have a thorough training
in the matter of style, should have a
wide knowledge of world affairs and
should especially have the ability to
read French and German.
In connection with the treatment of
the present war news by the daily
press, he stated that the manner in
which the papers had universally pre-
sented the case of each country involv-
ed in the great conflict had done much
towards keeping the judgment of the
American people in neutral thoughts
and actions on the streets.
Dr. Williams was also the guest at
an informal gathering of Sigma Delta
Chi, national journalistic fraternity,
last night. The general theme of hid
talk, which was of an informal nature,
was the profession of journalism and
what a journalist can make of his life.
"The journalist," said Dr. Williams,
"is perhaps the lowest paid profess-
ional man."
NELSON C. FIELD WITHDRAWS
POETRY PRIZE FOR THIS YEAR
No' Field poetry prize will be award-
ed this year, as the donor, Mr. Nelson
C. Field, has withdrawn his offer. The
prize is one which has been offered
and awarded annually since 1909. Mr.
Field has expressed his regret in not
being able to give the offer this year,
but he hopes to be in a position to re-
new the prize next year.
Candidates for the advertising prize
of $100 should not confuse this with
the Field offer. The money for the ad-
vertising contest is already in the
university treasury.
C.E. SmitlF Addresses Forestry Smoker
University Forestry club w ill 'hold
its smoker at 7::30 o'clock tomorrow
night in room 407 engineering building.
C. E. Smith, city forester of Detroit,
will speak to the club on "City For-
estry." The admission to the smoker
will be 25 cents.

FAULTY EPELLS
TOB.COUNI17;
Conviction of Sophomore in Justice
Dotys Court Followed by
Dhsisissal from
University
NO DEFENSE OFFERED WHILE
HE ARING OF ACTION . PASSES
Organized Attempt to Be Made to Rid
Town of Worthless
Check Game
Thomas B. McCoun, '17, was expelled
from the university last night at a
meeting of the faculty of the literary
college, following his conviction last
Wednesday in Justice Doty's court
of having obtained money under false
pretenses. The specific charges against
McCoun were the passing of worthless
checks at Wagner and Company's and
the Majestic billiard hall.
Other charges of a minor nature
were made against McCoun, and it was
brought out that he has been taken
into court for passing bad checks be-
fore this year. He was given a hoar-
ing before the faculty, but offere no
defense for his actions.
When interviewed last 'night, Mc-
Coun refused to make any statement,
merely saying that he will return to
his home, Frankfort, Kentucky, tomor-
row. He also remained silent con-
cerning the fine of $23.70 that was im-
posed upon him Wednesday by Justice
Doty.
McCoun cashed a check for $2.50 on
the First National bank at the ,a ieltc
billiard hall the middle of last month.
He was notified by the management
ihat he had no funds at th bank,
where he has never carried an ac-
count, and was repeatedly urged to
settle the matter peaceably. Although
he steadily neglected to do so, the man-
agement refused to prosecute him, and
it was not until he was called 'into
court to answer for the passing of a
$4.00 check at Wagner's that he was
convicted.
McCoun's expulsion will mean the
beginning of an organized attempt to
get rid fof the worthless check game,
according to those active in his prose-
cution. Complaints have been heard
from 21 local merchants in regard to
the practice, and it is reported t: t
these men have 19 forged checks in
their possossion as well as numerous
no funds" slips.
SHIVEL PLAYS AT THIRD BASE
ON FIRST SET OF INFIELDERS
Shivel held down third base on the
first set of infielders to take the gym
floor after the close of the regular
practice in the cage yesterday after-
noon, the other positions being taken
by the men who seem to be the coach's
favorites for his first lineup. Maltby
was at first, McQueen at second, and
Brandell at short, while Benton did
the catching..
The race between Shivel and Waltz,
who covered the third sack for the sec-
ond set of infielders, is a hot one, the
men alternating in working with the
five men who take the bases first.
Each man seems to show a' distinct
class above the other candidates for
that place, and between the twothere
is almost no choice, judging from what a
each one has shown so far indoors.
FRESH PHARICS AND JUNIOR
ENGINEERS WIN RELAY RACES

' In the closest and fastest relay race
that has been staged in the class se-
ries this season, the fresh pharmics
defeated the fresh lits yesterday af-
ternoon in the unusual time of 1:56
2-5. The junior engineers defeated the
fresh engineers and the two victors of
yesterday's struggles are booked to
run Wednesday afternoon for the cam-
pus championship.
The race between the pharmics and
fresh lits was a see-saw affair through-
out, "Al" Robinson, the freshman
sprinter bringing victory to the phar-
mics when he made up an eight yard
handicap and flashed across the line
a scant three yards in advance of the
lit representative, on the last lap 'of
the race.
Marksmen Pick Wilcoxen for Captain
L. C. Wilcoxen, '16E, who ranks first
among the men who have taken part.
in more than five of the Rifle club's
matches, has been elected captain of
the team.

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