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March 21, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

'11C

igan

Daily

Li

. . i

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 21, 1915.

PRICE I

it
On,
'''

Diocesan Head to Administer Rite

BISHOP CHAS. D. WILLIAMS TO
PREACH AT MORNING SERVICE

TALCOTT WILLIAMS TALKS T
NEWSPAPER CLASS TOMOR
Director of Pulitzer School Lee
on "The Press and the
Nation"

of

Confirmation to Class of
Candidates
Bishop Charles D. Williams of the
Episcopal diocese of Michigan will be

i

Mr. Willard H. Beehan speaks{
"Watchman, Tell Us of the Nigh
at the Union, 3:00 o'clock.
Doctor Frank W. Gunsaulus speaks
Hill-auditorium, 7;00 o'clock.

LL,"
l I.

Rev. R. S. Loring speaks on "Optimism
as a Safe Philosophy" at the Unitari-
an church, 10:30 o'clock.

N.

Fetter speaks on "Gathering
gments" at the First Baptist
10:30 o'clock.

the speaker at the morning service at
St. Andrew's church at 10:30 o'clock
today. In addition to preaching the
sermon, he will administer the rite of
confirmation to a class of adults and
students.
During the past several weeks, Bish-
op Williams has served as university
preacher at Harvard, Williams and
Yale, and as Lenten noonday preacher
in St. Stephens church, Philadelphia.
He has recently delivered a series of
sermons at the University of Chicago,
and at several other points in the
west. His last visit to Ann Arbor was
in the capacity of an afternoon speak-s
er at one of the Michigan Union Sun-t
day afternoon meetings.f

Talcott Williams, director of the
itzer school of journalism at Colu
University, will lecture before
combined classes in journalism at
o'clock tomorrow afternoon, inr
203 Univeristy hall. Professor'
liams will talk on "The Press an
Nation."
Professor Williams is a' profo
scholar, and is especially learne
the Arabic language and dialects.
though the lecture is given chiefly
the students of journalism, it iso
to the general public.

114)
ROWt
tuires
Pul-
mbia
the
2:00
room
Wil-
d the
ound
d in
Al-
for
open

. I

BOARD IN CONTROL POSTPONES A PN 051NO UMR0

I

A. Barrett speaks on
an Conscience" at the
church, 10:30 o'clock.

George W. Knepper speaks on
.r Legacy of Peace" at the Church

o'clock.

I

Rev. E. C. Boynton speaks at the Con-
gregational church, 10:30 o'clock.

I

rles D. Williams speaks a
.ndrew's Episcopal churci

i

h

71 1

ev. A. W. Stalker speaks on "Infant
Damnation" at the First Methodist
church, 10:30 o'clock.

I

TOMORROW

Dazupta will speak on
n the economics lecture
o'clock.

i

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS TOUR
MERGED WITH MECHANCAL TRIP
Electrical engineers' spring tour of
inspection has been merged with the
mechanical engineering trip and those
'who have signed for the electrical trip
will join the other party. The com-
bined tour will be conducted by Prof.
John R. Allen and Commander E. C.
Rowan, of the mechanical engineering
department. The tourists will leave
Ann Arbor April 9, returning on April
19.

a
t

"TINY" KOHLER TAKES 11ORK-OUT
Last Year's Track Captain Source of
Wonder to Meet Spectators
Following the "Dub" meet yesterday
afternoon in the gym, spectators were
surprised to see a huge youth putting
the shot over in the region set aside
for that purpose, with a certain style
and form that attracted immediate at-
tention.
Freshmen were particularly im-
pressed. In fact when the new "phen-
om" took off his sweater and display-
ed a Varsity "M" they wondered even
nore and began to question each other.
They weren't long in doubt either. It
was "Tiny" Kohler, last year's track
captain who is spending a few days in
he city.

I
c
I
t
t

>tt Williams speaks to students of
rnalism at 2:00 o'clock, room 203,
iversity hall.
.en Wirts talks on "Period Furni-
e Design" at 2:00 o'clock, larger
and floor gallery, Memorial
lding.
dian club smoker in the Cosmo-
itan club rooms at ,8:00 o'clock.
AV ri RAW nr

DR. GUSULSTO,
PREACH AT SERVICE

WUHBEHNTALKS
AT UNION MEETING

Armour Institute of Technology He
Will Speak in Auditorium
ATEonight T
MAKES ANNUAL VISITTO10CH

ead
T

O
li

fficial of Lake Shore Will Address
Gathering at 3:00 O'clock
This Afternoon
USICAL PROGRAM WILL FOLLOW

.W 1 EEEWUU -'U.
Control Will Give Insignia.
o Winning Team at
Des Moines

FOR MENTOR

;I

Michigan men running on a winning
sity at relay team at the Drake carnival will
receive the track."M" for their efforts,
al Col- this decision being the result of the
agreement of the board in control of
al Col- athletics at its meeting yesterday af-
ternoon.
sity at "Tommy" Hughitt, of last year's
Varsity nine and quarterback of the
sity at football team for the past few years,
was appointed to the position of All-
ylvania Fresh baseball coach, the position last
year, held by "Johnny" Lavans.
ylvania The track team was one of the chief
topics of discussion. Beside coming
hedule in for the award of a letter on condi-
es and tion of winning at the Drake Reilays,
ngage- action was passed against sending it
utions. to the San Francisco meet. Coach
ege at Farrell's men will journey to Chicago,
however, on April 3 to take part in the
at Ann A. A. U. meet. .
Official approval was given to the
at De- 1915 Varsity football schedule so far
completed. The list of encounters is

;i
t

"Watchman, Tell Us of the Night," is
the subject on which Mr. Willard H.
Beehan, of Cleveland, assistant chief
engineer of the Lake Shore and Mich-,
igan Southern railway system, will
speak at the Union get-together, at
3:00 o'clock this afternoon.
Dean M. E. Cooley who is a cousin
of Mr. Beehan, will entertain him
during the latter's visit in this, city.
The visitor is renowned for his inter-
est in young men. He is a great lead-
er in Y. M. C. A. work, being the found-
er of several organizations and at
present the head of the railroad "Y"
organization. He was present at a-
conference of eigineers of the univer-
sity several months ago, when he
spoke four times in one day before
Michigan students. Kenneth Wester-
mann, grad., will sing, and Gerald
Strong, '15D, will give a violin solo,
as the musical part of the program.

As the speaker at the large unionj
service to be held 4onight in Hill au-
ditorium under the auspices of the
Presbyterian church, the officers oL
that body have secured Dr. Frank. W.
Gunsaulus, of Chicago, president of
the Armour Institute of Technology.
The service will begin promptly at.
7:00 o'clock, and it will be featured
by a special musical program. As has'
been customiary throughout this series,
of special Hill auditorium union ser-
vic'es, practically all of the local
churches will dispense with their ev-
ening program.
Dr. Gunsaulus is well known in Ann
Arbor, having made annual visits here
for a number of years. Many present
day critics rank him as one of the
greatest preachers in America, and his
address will probably be of consider-
able interest to a university audience
because of his long connection with
the Armour Institute. During the
time that he is in Chicago, Dr. Gun-
saulus speaks to large audiences in
the Auditorium theater, and these ser-
vices are much on the same order as
the famous weekly service conducted
at the Cooper Union in New York City.

t
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e
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p
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b
a
c
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as
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et
ha

Webber Censures Board i Vintrol.
Charles Webber, member of the 1914
Varsity baseball team, made the fol-
lowing statement last night. Be de-
nounces the board in control for dodg-
ing the summer baseball issue ,at yes-
terday's meeting. Webber further giv-
es as his opinion that baseball 'eligibil-
ity conditions are so notoriously bad
that it is useless to plead ignorance of
existing evils, in the case of board
members.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
In an editorial in Saturday's Daily,
entitled "Expediency vs. honesty,' 1.
Beach Carpenter, the editor of The
Daily, made statements in regard to
the baseball situation here at Michigan
that warrant the attention of every
student and alumnus of the University
of Michigan. I personally wish to take
a stand with Beach Carpenter and back
him up in an effort to remedy the sit-.
nation. Before doing so, however, I
want to state that I will not play base-;
ball for the university this spring even
though the board should abolish the t
summer baseball ruling and declare
me eligible. I tak'e this stand for the3
reason that some have said that y I
motive in agitating this issue was _
ause I knew I could not play myself
nd therefore I wanted to prevent Qth-
rs from playing. I wish to make cleatr
:hat my motive in this controversy is d
he desire to free Michigan men and 8
thers from a situation that practically n
ails upon every college baseball play-
r to commit perjury.
The students and the alumni of the n
niversity have known for years that g
he men representing the university a
ave played baseball for money and c
hey have countenanced the practice, a
n the belief that it was a universal h
ractice. In other words, they held B
hat the rule was a dead letter. That e
eing the case, men have gone on year a
fter year committing perjury practi-.
ally openly, as they had the public t
pinion of the student body behind p
hem.
The 'board in control has known of'
. u
his and has made some effort 1o cor-
ect the situation, but in gneral, it ei
as been quite lax, there bng only e
ne case of notoriety in the past few b
ears, and that was so open that it
ould not be avoided. It, of course,
T
as been laboring under difficulties, T
he main one being, in my opinion, a
ck of sympathy with the rule which B
as prevented strict enforcement. D
D
The day when the candidates for the a
arsity team sign the statements that t
ey have not participated in so-called s
ummer baseball is a day to remember. {
ractically all of the men have played e
r money and so the signing of the h
aper is looked upon as a huge joke.
hey do not feel conscience-stricken, to
they are acquainted with the inef- G
ctiveness of the rule. I am not mal- p
g this statement from observation s
ly, for I committed perjury when I w
gfned the paper in the spring of 1913, E
I had played two games for money di
e previous summer. My reasons for a
mmitting perjury were that I re-,
rded the rule as being one that was
A binding. This year I did not care
repeat the process, although I could ti
.ve done so and could have played
ithout much chance of being discov-
ed, because even though I felt the m
le to be a dead one, I now felt that to
the eyes of some of my friends I
as not doing the square thing. That
ea being repugnant, I decided to take
stand. I have confessed my perjury ag
cause I have no desire to be regard-e
as a saint or an angel. no
Our situation at present is a rotten
e. Either we should line up for the m
le prohibiting summer, baseball or u
e we should abolish it entirely. To th

force the rule means two things: sq
her the men who have played base-
1ll for money must admit it or else al
(Continued on Page 6)

4W FIC AL'S VEIL PROC
IN ECRECY; 1IVULG
Chairman Threatens Edit
Memirers Evade Li
Publicity
Michigan's board in co
letics failed to pass the e
iner baseball resolution at
yesterday afternoon,
As a result members of
squad will be compelled to
sign falsehoods, until so:
done. The question was tc
a special order of businei
day's meet'ing. It did, acct
chairman, but action w
The board did not meet t
more than it has in the :
months that the topio ha
tated.
Charles Webber, menbe
year's Varsity, was before
in its secret session for 20 :
s understood that he mad
accusations as to the ro
baseball eligibility conditio
gan, confirming the editori
day's Daily. Nothing was(
strength of his assertions.
matter, was laid over.
Aside from the fact that 1
baseball matter was evade
nation concerning the mee
ard to this important topic
Ole from officials. The
eedings are veiled in sec
s the campus can ascerta
man A. S. Whitney and Seci
3artelme both refused to s
d for or against the resolu
ssigned as a reason that
as still pending, and tt
hese circumstances, it w
recedent to give out the .d
Whitney Threatens j
CMairrnian A. . Whitney
uder attack in the Confer
ion several years ago, cal
ditor of The Michigan Dal
ning, following the meet
card. H informed him th
her "unwarranted charges
he Daily might likely h<
eing summoned 'before Pr
Hutchins to answer for h
r. Whitney was informed
'aily regarded its stand a
nd that it would do all in
> use fairness and accur
tatements. It regretted, M
as told, the necessity whic
d it to censure the memb
Sard of which he is chalrrr
The following questions v
Prof. A.S. Whitney, chair
.Bartelme, secretary, and)
atterson, member , in ord
me facts about the inee
hich predicitions could b
xcept for the point that I
d come up, these men refu
nything about the summe
uestion for publication.
The questions asked were:
1. Did the summer base
on come up in any form at
fg?
2. Were any proposals c
ade to allow ,Varsity has
participate in summer ba
3. Were they passed?
4. Who voted for and v
;ainst each of them?
5. If names cannot be g
t?
6. Did a former Varsity
an make a statement that
idertake to prove that a n
e men on the Michigan
uad were ineligible?
7. As a result of this a
Ong with any other that m
(Continued on Page

Body Refuses
off De)
. D

011 Ofte
Past

I

Prof. Humphreys Lectures, at Illinois
Prof. W. R. Humphreys of the engi-
neering college will deliver a lecture
this afternoon at a combined meeting'
of the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A.
of the University of Illinois. He prob-
ably will return in time to meet his

Workers Return from Religious Meet
W. H. Tinker, religious director of
the "Y," and H. Rotzel, student pastor
of the Methodist church, returned from
Cleveland, Ohio, yesterday, where they
attended a conference of religious.

a

at

as follows:
Oct. 9-Case at Ann Arbor.
Oct. 16-Mt. Union at Ann Arbor.
Oct. 23-M. A. C. at Ann Arbor.
Oct. 30-Syracuse at -Ann Arbor.
Nov. 6-Cornell at Ann Arbor.
Nov. 13-Pennsylvania at Philadel-
phia'.
Among the other business to come
up at the meeting was the question
of the awards to be made to the Rifle
club's team, it being decided to refer
that business to the board of direc-
tors with the power to act on the peti-
tion.

cao

sses tomorrow.

workers.

Hill Auditorium

_i
1
t
r
E
E
i.-E
.,
......

Union

service,

.'
.,

h

Dr.F

rank

unsaulus

Hill
Auditorium
7:00 o'clock
Tonight

U

President of Armour Institute of Technology

P

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