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March 17, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-03-17

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MtORNINGCA
11.00 LOCAL

The

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE
NIOW

119.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

PRIOFI FTVg~

r

"MEN STRIKE'
SISTENT PAGE
I of Final Target in Yale
itch Will Mark End
of Men's Indoor
Season
IDAHO COMPETITION
'RE VIOUS LEADER I)OWN
rames Shot, Total of Squrid
22,, Making ierage
of 903
Yale match, of which all
get has been completed, the
st still to be shot on the
ifle team's indoor schedule,
n the team seem to hav,
nsistent pace and are shoot-
evenly. Six members of the
an average of 180 or above,
one man is shooting below

1 (- _ _. _ ____ .
I "SN. .._ SA1._.. MKS: _ .

TODAY

Cosmopo-Night at Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Corin wrce club dinner at the Union,
6 :00 o'clock.
Faculty night at the Union, 7:30
o'clock.
Meeting of fresh lits, 4:00 o'clock, as-
sembly room, economics building.
TOMORROW
Complimentary faculty concert in Hill
auditorium, 4:15 o'clock.
Forum.meets at Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Senior engineer dinner at Union, 6:00
o'clock.
First meeting of Minnesota students.
at Union, 3:30 o'clock.

FOREIGN STUDENTS
TO MEETAT UNIO'N
Gatherings Are Inaugurated Tonight
Where Foreigner May
Meet American
Men
APPOINT HAROLD SCHRADZSKI
TO BE MASTER OF CEREMONIES
Entertainment Includes :Japanese
Fencing and Chinese
Shuttlecock

OFFERS PLANS FOR
CONFISCATIONDAY1
Chester 1-. Lang Recommends System
for Appropriating "Civilian"
headgear Worn by
Freshmen
CAP NIGHT COMES ON MAY 28;
TIME OF BOAT CLUB REGATTA
To Send Letter to Regents Advising
Improvement of Fire
Protection

TELL OF SUMMER BIOLOGY WORK

Publish Alnnoulncement Giving Loca-
tion of Camp and Courses Offered
Ann ouncement of the work for the
biological station of the 1915 summer
session has just been made, the pub-
lication containing a description of the
location of the station, near the Bo-
gardus Engineering camp in Cheboy-
gait county, the various courses of in-
struction, and the staff of instructors.
The station does not duplicate the
work of the regular university courses,
but provides facilities for field work
that cannot be carried on in Ann Ar-
bor. In addition to the corps of in-
structors in botany and zoology, a
physician connected with the univer-
sity health service is in constant at-
tendance at the camp.
Among the outside men who have
been secured for the station work are1
the following: Max M. Ellis, of the
University of Colorado; W. W. Cort, of
Macalester College; Frank T. McFar-
land, of the University of Kentucky;
F~r ,p nr0 fn "$+, T..- '"

SANGER PICKS OU
SPECIALTY STUN'
Grinstead and Dunne to Intro
Classical Dance, Garbed
in Old Greek
Costume
CHAIRMAN BAXTER HOLDS SI
MANUSCRIPTS FOR 1916 P7

Continue Distribution of
Union ''his Morning
Afternoon

Slips
and

Cosmopo-Night, the first affair of its
kind in the university, will be held to-
night when the Michigan Union will
throw open its doors to the foreign
students. In inaugurating the recep-
tion, the Union aims to establish a
closer friendship between cosmopoli-
tans and American students. The pro-
gram which has been arranged in-
cludes addresses by representatives of
the foreign students and the Union
members, and also characteristic
games and music of several nationali-

ecent match with Idaho proved
dling block for J. P. Thompson,
is hitherto led the squad in
Thompson has stood first
ii 182 for the last three match-
his slip to a 181 score in theI
ncounter pulled his average
vhile that of L. C. Wilcoxen
sted to 182 by his Idaho score.
during the past few weeks, has
i. strong inclination to "come
fter her recent slump and has
>oting scores of about 925 -and
order to shoot a total score
he Michigan team must turn
verage score of 185 per man
e Yale match is completed to-
'om the scores of the men in
events an average shows that
a is shooting a score of 903.'
res follow:
Washington ..............861
Arizona ............. ...899
Kansas Ags . ............903
Rhode Island ..........913
Nebraska ...............923
Lehigh ..................901
Miss. Ag. & Mech........906
Idaho ................... 919f

SISLR REAPPEARS
FOR GYMWORKOUT
Baseball Squad Goes Through Regular
Practice of Batting and .
Fielding
LUNI)REN EMPHASIZES BUNTING
Ex-Captain Sisler made his return to
the fold of Coach Lundgren's Varsity
baseball candidates yesterday after-
noon after an absence which was en-
forced by his recent threatened attack
of throat trouble. The veteran twirl-
er did not take part in the work in
the cage, but confin'ed the exercise of
his arm to a limbering up drill on the
side lines.
' Coach Lundgren sent his candidates
for the Varsity through their regular,
workout yesterday, the tryouts spend-
ing nearly two hours at batting prac-
tice in the cage- and the remaining
time in chasing grounders and wing-
ing the ball down to first.
The race for the position at short ,
promises to be a hot one, six candi-E

ties.
Harold Schradzski, '16L, has been ap-
pointed master of ceremonies, and will
hold sway in the big room at the Un-
ion where the cosmopolitan gathering;
will convene. Harry D. Parker, '15L,
will make the address for the Anieri-
can students, and William Robertson,
'16D, of South Africa, will reply for
the foreigners.
W. C. Achi, '14-'17L, and Q.W. Crock-
att, '17E, will provide Hawaiian music,
including both song and instrumental
selections. A. H. Koumjian, '16M, and
J. H. Koumjian, '17M, will give Ar-
menian folk music. Chung Hsieh, '18E,
will give an exhibition of the Chinese
shuttlecock, while M. N. Imake, grad,
and M, Kihohara, '17, will stage a Jap-
anese fencing bout. A Porto Rican
number is also being arranged. The
big room at the Union will bt decorat-
ed with flags representing more than.
20' different countries. Smokes and
refreshments will be provided.
All foreign students are urged to at-
tend the gathe ing.
CLOSE INDOOR SEASON APRIL 3
Members of Rifle Club hold Dinner at
Union Next Month

"Confiscation Day," a time shortly
before cap night, when all freshmen
appearing on the campus without their
traditional gray caps, should have
their "civilian" hats seized by sopho-
mores and others bound by duty and
solemn obligation, was advocated by
Chester H. Lang, '15, who appeared
before the student council last night,
and urged the body to support the
plan. Both Lang and "Tommy" Hugh-
itt, '15E, are urging the measure,which
met with'considerable approval by the
council, in its role as champion of
Michigan traditions. T. E. Agee, '15L,
H. M. Lacy, '15, and T. P. Soddy, '16E,
were appointed to work with Lang and
Hughitt. The purpose of the plan
is to secure better keeping of the cus-
tom of wearing fresh caps.
Cap night this year will come on Fri-
day, May 28, at the time of the Boat
club regatta, and the spring games"
will come on the Friday and Saturday
of the preceding week, at the time of
the interscholastic meet, according to
the decision of the council last night.
The tug-of-war will be held on Friday
afternoon about 4:00 o'clock, and the
push ball contest the next morning.
A letter will be' sent to the regents
recommending an investigation by
them with, a view to improving the
fire protection of the north wing of
University hall, at the time when. the
south wing is to be remodeled, which,
it is understood, will take place when
the botany and zoology departments,
now housed in it, are removed to the
new science building. The council hes-
itated to petition for fire escapes to be
put on the north wing at this time,
since it is doubtful if this would be a,
solution of the problem, as the chief
difficulty seems to be the narrow

and 'rank t. Gates, of the University
of the Philippines.-.
NORALIESWILL
Expect Big Delegation from Ypsilanti
to Support Orator in State
Peace Contest
PINNEY SPEAKS FOR MICHIGAN
Recent developments seem to indi-
cate that the Normalites from Ypsilan-
ti plan an extensive invasion of Ann
Arbor in order to lend support to their
representative in the state 'Peace con-

rage .................. .....)03
averages of the individuals who
hot in official matches, as com-
from the scores are as follows:j

At meetings yesterday and Mor
afternoons, Director Sanger selec
the men who will 'put on the speci
acts for the opera, "All That Glitte
Although it has not yet been defini
decided, the majority of these perfo

Matches
Wilcoxen ......7
Thompson .....4
Curtiss......
Moser ..,.... .7
Anderson .....7
Schoepfle .....7
Simons......6
Steere.......6
Marks .........5
. DeGowan ....1
Wood.......2
Cutting .......3
. Hussey......2

Total
1273
726
1267
1255
1236
1235
1053
1044
860
169
328
479
314

Av.
182
181:
181
180
180
180
175
174
172
169
164
160
157

dates trying out for this place. Bran-
dell at present shows the greatest
promise, his fielding being consistent
and his throwing accurate. He ,best
distinguishes himself in the cage, how-
ever, where he has developed the hab-
it of hitting everything that comes
within reach. Should the other side of
his game improve to the same quality
as his hitting, he must be counted on
for a place on the 1915 Varsity nine.
Bunting practice has been worked
into the regular cage routine by Coach
Lundgren, who is training his men in
the gentle art which accomplished
their downfall in some of last season's
conflicts. This side of the game will
be emphasized, according to thecoach,
until every man has ,earned the sci-
ence of bunting. With this knack cap-
tured by every player, he expects to
see Michigan break up more than one
game by its judicious use.
ALUMNUS E1)ITOR WILL REVIEW
DENNIS' AND JEYNNNGS' BOOKS

Michigan's indoor rifle season will
be brought to a formal close the even-
ing of April 3, when.the Rifle club will
give a dinner at the Union for all men
who are members of the club or who
are interested in shooting. The din-
net will be given in honor of the Mich-
igan Rifle club's team.
Before the close of the indoor sea-
son, medal shooting will be taken up
at the Ferry field range, the medals
which the government awards being
the object of the shooting. A charge
of 40 cents is made for targets which
may be ordered through Intramural
Director Rowe, secretary of the club.
The government awards a silver
watch-fob and the title of sharpshoot-.
er to the man who turns in a score
of above 90 for standing and above 95
for prone. The next honor is the
award of a bronze fob and the title of
marksman for the man who can reg-
ister above 80 standing and above 85
prone. The medals are given by the
United States through the National:
Rifle association.
All members of the club are eligible
to shoot for the medals.

stairs and hallways.
Detailed plans for the carrying out
of a campus election day will be drawn
up, and will be discussed in the coun-
cil within the next three weeks, and
then will be submitted to the Michi-
gan Union, Y. M. C. A. and athletic
association for official action. The
council wishes to extend this plan to
class elections, and to'other organiza-
tions wishing to come under it.
T. E. Agee, '15L, spoke in favor of
restoring open campaigning at elec- I
tions, which, he 'thought, would draw
out a larger and more representative
vote than the present system. The
councilmen decided to sound student
opinion on this question preparatory
to taking more definite action. Alian
T. Ricketts, '15E, former presigent of
the council, who' was present at the
meeting, said, "With some restrictions,
such as correcting the former abuse
of election cards, I believe the plan
would be advisable."
A petition from Griffins gave more
impetus to the movement among the
medics to secure the use of the gym-
(Continued on Page 6)

1
i
t
4
i
I
i
t
,
6
E
c
G

test which will be staged in University
Hall Friday night. Their enthusiasm,
unless offset by counter demonstra-
tions, may count for much in the final
results, as Michigan's representative,
N. E. Pinney, '16, will labor under the
disadvantage of being the first speak-
er of the evening. It may therefore be
vital 'to Michigan's chances that Pin-
ney receive the hearty encouragement'
of Michigan rooters, and the Oratorical
association urges all men who possibly,
can attend the clash, to enroll in the
cheering section which will be formed
for the occasion previous to opening
the doors in the evening.
The Michigan State Normal oratorl
has been under the instruction of Prof.
F. B. McKay, '09, a charter member of
the Lyceum club and former represen-
tative of Michigan in the Northern Or-
atorical Le'ague contest. The M. A. C.
entry, G. W. Cockran, has also been
under the tutelage of an able MFichigan
graduate, Prof. C. B. Mitchell, an ac-
tive participant in oratorical work
while in the university.
As the contest is under the auspices
of the state Peace- association, and
without the control of the local Ora-
torical association, season tickets will
not admit, and 25 cents will be charg-
ed for admission. A portion of . the
seats will be reserved for the cheering
section. Doors open at 7:15 o'clock,
and will be closed during each speech.

ances probably will come during th
second act of the production.
Durward Grinstead, '16L, and Mau
ice F. Dunne, '17L,'will present a cla
sical dance, appearing in Grecian co
tume. Mr. Sa'nger expressed himse
as highly pleased with the specialt
which is quite out 'of the ordinary :
productions of the nature of the Unic
opera. Another act will be given "I
S. W. Dubee, '16E, and R. D. McCre
'17E, who will offer a tumbling exh
bition entitled, "Rolling Stones."
E. G. Hildner, '17, and Earl F: Ban]
ey, '17, are to present a feature Ge:
man-Jewish dialect act, with a son
following the lines. A. S. Hart, '1
will give a special singing stunt, Chas
Ashbaugh, '16, and A. D. Honey, '17]
are billed to introduce an instrumenta
duet.
General 'Chairman K. S. Baxter ha
received synopses for next year's 01
era from six men. These give the na
ture of the plot and how the idea is I
be worked out. The manuscripts wi
be handed over to Director Sange'
who will inform the writers of the nec
essary changes.
The distribution of slips 'for seat
will be continued from 9:15 to 12:11
o'clock and fron 2:00 to 5:00 o'cloc
today. The line, will form at the sid
entrance of the Union, and Ll tho&
desiring slips must have their mem,
bership tickets.
Will Publish Codified Rules Soon
With the plan in view of codifyin
all of the rules and regulations whic
are now in force in the college of en
gineering, the faculty of that colleg
are now, gathering and classifyin
material which will appear in book-
let form for distribution. The depari
ment committee of the college ha
been at work on the classificetion o
the material for some- time, and .re
cently a first, draft of all the activ
rules in force was gathered and print
ed. -Now the rules are being gone ov
er and put into shape, and probabl
will be ready for publication in thei
final form in about two months.
P .
RHETORIC FACULTY
4 Many First Year Men Expected t
Attend Get-Together
Meeting

DISCUSSS
RNIT VALUE
!g is Whether Presence
nizations Betters
Campus

DEBATING SOCIETIES PREPARE
FOR PRELIMINARY CUP TRIAL

TO PRESIDE

Michigan Campus Better for
ice of Fraternities?" will be
for discussion at the next
f the Forum, to be held at
at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow
muel Witting, '15, will act'
ig officer.
he. fraternity question has
brought before the students
xn for a long time, it is felt
ibject will bring out a num-
akers. The backers of the
esire all those who have
he topic for discussion to
e gathering. The Forum
re not intended to furnish
es for debate, but are to
.e views of men who have
n the subjects considered.
Writes Article for Atlas
everett, lecturer on glacial
the author of an article in
rbor folio of. the U. S. Geo-
as, in which he gives an
description of the roads,'

"Gas Analysis," by L. M. Dennis, '85,
and "Behavior of the Lower Organ-
isms," by Herbert S. Jennings, Ph.D.
'93, are the titles of two new books
that are being sent to the editor of the
Alumnus for review.
In writing on the various methods
of gas analysis, Mr. Dennis, who is
professor of inorganic chemistry at
Cornell, has described the more re-
cently approved pieces of apparatus,
the mainer of using them and the re-I
sults of the more recent research ex-
periments.
Mr. Jennings is professor of experi-
mental zoology at Johns Hopkins Uni-
versity.
HON. LEE E. JOSLYN LECTURES
ON BANKRUPTCY LAW PRACTICE
lion. Lee E. Joslyn, of Detroit, ref-
eree in bankruptcy, will give a second
lecture on ' the subject, "Practice and
Procedure in Bankruptcy," in room G,
law building, at 4:00 o'clock this af-
ternoon.
In his lecture last Wednesday, Mr.
Joslyn outlined the preliminary steps
necessary for the filing of a petition'
in bankruptcy. This afternoon he will
deal with the question of composition
in closing up estates.'

Men From Many Nations Will,
Srace Pre _Cosmopo-Night

Jeffersonian and Webster Clubs
Pick Men for Coming Fight
on Merchant Marine

Will

.PREVIOUS

ATTENDANCE

I

The German and the Irishman,
The Frenchman and the Swede,
The Scotchman, Belgian, Russian,
Pole,
The Persian and the Mede,
The sentimental Spaniard,
And the Portugese, his mate,
Will grace the first Cosmopo-Night
This eve at half past eight.
A new word has been coined. It has,
been coined to fit a new activity of the
Michigan Union. It has been coined to
fit a gathering composed of represen-
tatives of every nation engaged in the
European war and the two others.
That word is Cosmopo-Night. No one
knows from what fertile brain this
polysyllable has sprung, but it has
sprung to stay.

Cosmopo-Night means many things.
t means 160 letters sent to as many
members of the Cosmopolitan club. It
means many members of the faculty in
gay regalia and clever repartee. It
means music by Moritz and Sikes,
those song birds of Michigan's musical
organizations. It means sword fights
and exhibitions of native skill by mem-
bers of the Cosmopolitan club, It
means a big, glad hand by Schradzski,
swell eats by "Denny," the king of the
Union kitbhein, and a free-for-all talk
fest by all those who cross the Union
portals tonight. Best of all, it is an
open house for all students of the uni-
versity, whether they are members of
the Cosmopolitan club or not.

Jeffersonian and Webster debating
societies are now lining up their men
for the preliminary contests of the
Cup debate, which will be held April
30. Jeffersonian will meet at 7:30
o'clock tomorrow night to choose its
team for the clash with Alpha Nu on
April 7.
Webster tryouts for the contest with
Adelphi on April 8, will take place at
7:00 o'clock Friday night. The first
speaker will have six minutes, with
three minutes for rebuttal, while oth-
ers will be given a total of seven min-
utes. The subject for debate will be,
"Resolved, That the United States
Should Own and Operate a Merchant
Marine." Fourteen men have places
in the debate, part of whom have not
as yet signified the side they are go-
ing, to take. They should decide and
notify T. H. Westlake, '16L, by tomor-,
row. Those who wish to attend the
Peace contest may do so by exchang-
ing places with speakers who are at
present listed for the earlier part of
the evening.

From the past two crowds in atte
ance at the faculty nights at the Uni
a large delegation is expected at 7
o'clock tonight to meet the fact
members of the rhetoric departme
both of the literary and engineer
colleges.
The following faculty men hz
been invited: Prof. F. N. Scott, Pr
T. E. Rankin,. Prof. J. R. Brumm, T
H. S. Mallory, Mr..R. W. Cowden, T
H. S. Sensemann, Mr. L. L. Brys
Mr. R. P. Lane, Mr. E. E. Everett, T
Martin Feinstein, Mr. M. C. Weir, T
H. P. Scott, Mr P. G. Grim, Mr. W.
Moriarty, Mr. 0. C. Marckwardt, P
S. W. Peterson, Mr. G. G. Wright, P
A. D. DeFoe, Mr. J. E. Thornton a
Mr. E. M. Grinnell.
As rhetoric. is a required subj
for freshmen, it is expected that
large number of the first year re
dents will attend the gatherings.
set program has been arranged for t
meeting, as these nights are to sei
as a get-together for the faculty a
students.

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