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March 12, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-03-12

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ING

Th .-Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE

I

V, No. 115.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

_._._...

(K MEN LEAVE
EAST TONIGHT
's Victory Over J.L. (Grahinan
yides Make-up of Squad
Which Goes to
Syracuse
L LAUGHS AT REPORTS
~RNING INJURED BOWZER I

_ MICHIGAN TO MEET
~ LLINOIS DEBATERS

J 0 I)IY"
Finals in Union bridge
Unii, 7:30 ,o'clock.
Camp Davis dance at
o'clock.
Dixie club dance at the
emy, 9:00 o'clock.

tournament at
Union, 8:00
Packard acad-

Will Argue That Labor Unions Should
Not Be Held as Combinations
in Restraint of Trade
FIRST CLASH IN NEW LEAGUE
When Illinois meets Michigan here
in a debate two weeks from tonight,
not only will the event be the first of

19 MEN SIGN UP
FOR COMING MEET
Time of (lass Track Affair Cli&anged
to 3:00 O'clock Tomorrow
Afternoon
48 ENTRANTS FOR 35-YARD DASH
Entries for the class track meet
closed yesterday afternoon with a total
of 219 names, which is about 40 more

on Expects Keen Competitiol
Pole Vault; ]Four May Stmt
in 40-yard Dash

ilk

Donnelly's victory over Grauman in
the mile yesterday afternoon, coupled
with the fact that none of the quarter-
milers equalled the time made by Bur-
by and Max Robinson the previous
day, definitely decided the make-up of
the Varsity squad which will be tak-
en to Syracuse.
The following men will leave: Cap-
tain Smith, O'Brien, Lapsley, Catlett,.
Corbin, Burby, M. G. Robinson, Fox,
Ufer, Carroll, Donnelly, Waterbury,
Berray, C. L. Cross, C. B. Cross and
Leach. In addition to these men,
Coach Farrell and Track Manager
Connely will make the trip. The men
will leave tonight over the Michigan
Central,
In the 40-yard dash Captain Smith,
O'Brien and Lapsley will start for the
Wolverines, with a possibility that
Max Robinson may also figure in the
event. Robinson and Burby will run
in the quarter, with Fox and Ufer start-
ing in the half. Incidentally, 'this pair
is banked upon to considerably more
than start, Carroll and Donnelly
will take care of the mile, and the
distance event is well cared for with
this duo scheduled to represent the
Wolverines.
Waterbury and Berray will do the
high jumping while Corbin may also
perform in this event, in addition to.
the hurdles. "Bo" Wilson and Cross.
are entered in the pole vault, which
event should prove one of the features.
of the evening, for Syracuse boasts of
a vaulter of exceptional ability.
C. L. Cross and Leach will wrestle
with the shot, and are slated to go up
against a midget 265-pounder whose
greatest qualification, however, seems.
to be his bulk. Captain Smith, O'Brien
and perhaps Lapsley will run the 300-
yard race, an.event that is not held in
Waterman gym meets. However, this
distance finds Captain Smith almost at
his best, and the field 'should trail
yards behind the dark-haired Michigan
leader.
Coach Farrell has been moved to'
mirth at the recent reports which.
have been sent out from Syracuse con-
cerning the injury of Bowzer, the col-
ored Syracuse sprinter. Coach Keane,
of Syracuse, is alleged to have said
that without Bowzer in the meet the
Orange expected to lose, but that with
him present, they would undoubtedly
win. Bowzer has been striving against
Michigan now for several years and
during that time has amassed the
grand total of two places. He finished
second in the quarter behind Phil
Jansen once, and in the outdoor meet
held here last year, finished third in
the 220. However, in justice to the
Maize and Blue athletes, it is only fair,
to explain that but three men were]
entered in this last mentioned event.i
Bowzer was certain of a point unless
he had suddenly expired on the wayf
down the course.
A report from Boston states that,
Bowzer is improving. Reports from,
Syracuse say he's not. If he doesn't
and Syracuse loses, Bowzer should,
prbve a great little alibi.
Society to Support Michigan Technic
At the meeting of the Architectural
society yesterday afternoon, it was
decided to affiliate with 'the Engineer-
ing society in the support of the Mich-
igan Technic. The society also decid-
ed to undertake the preparation of re-
productions of old masterpieces thatI
have taken the Grand Prix. The or-
ganization will give a dance on March
25 at Packard's dancing academy.,
Secures Place on Municipal Bureau
Dorothy M. Brown, '11, who was a
student in the Graduate School last

year, has been appointed to a position.]
on the bureau of municipal research at
Philadelphia. Miss Brown, who re-
ceived the position through the offices '
of the appointment committee, will as-
sist in investigating the sociological

Fresh lit business meeting, 4:00
o'clock, economics building.
TOMORROW
Union membership dance at Union,
9:00 o'clock.'
Chess and Checker club meets at Un-
ion, 7:30 o'clock.
Interclass track meet in Waterman
gymnasium, 3:00 o'clock.
Women's League fancy dress party,
Barbour gymnasium, 8:00 o'clock.
D. IT. It. KILLS MAN ON MAIN ST.
Milan Citizen, Thrown from Turning
Car, Fractures Skull

S. A. Garrison of Milan, Michigan,
was killed at 7:00 o'clock last evening,
when he attempted to alight from a D.
U. R. express car bound' from De-
troit, as it was rounding the corner
from William onto Main street. He
had evidently wished to leave the car
at that corner in order to reach the
station of the Ann Arbor railroad, and
did not realize beforehand that the car
did not stop there.
In alighting, Garrison's skull was
fractured, and he was rushed to the
university hospital where he died with-
in half an hour of the injury. He ap-
peared to be about 65 years old. In his
pockets were found a draft for $600,
and a deed to a farm. No blame for
the accident was placed upon the mo-
torman or conductor of the car.
MEN WORK IN TIME SECTIONS
Cornell's Baseball Squad Has Periods
Assigned for Drill
ITHACA, N. Y., March 11.-Cornell's
baseball squad is working out in time
sections in the batting cage, battery
men being assigned periods of 15 min-
utes each in which to take the indoor
-practice. Three or four batters are
assigned to each pair of battery try-
outs and the squad works alone dur-
ing the time allotted to it.
Seven pairs of batteries are now at
work in the early tryouts, and occupy
the time' from 1:45 o'clock to 3:30
o'clock with tossing to the batters in
the cage. The half hour between 3:30
o'clock and 4:00 o'clock is devoted to
infield practice.
About 40 men remain on the early
squad in active work at present, but
a cut is looked for the early part of
next week.
SEND OUT MARCH LAW REVIEW
Dean E. I. Thayer, Head of Harvard
School, Writes Article
Michigan Law Review for March was
published Wednesday. This month's
edition contains several articles by
prominent authorities throughout the
country. Dean Ezra Ripley Thayer,
head of the Harvard Law School, con-
tributed a comprehensive article on,
"Observations on the Law of Evi-
dence." Theodore P. Ion, of New York
City, auttority on international law,
wrote on "Treaties of Neutrality,"
while the subject, "Some Needed Re-
forms in the Method of Selecting Ju-
ries," was discussed by Judge Willis
B. Perkins of Grand Rapids.
ALPHA NU lEN TO DEBATE ON
MERCHANT MARINE QUESTION
Tryouts for the Alpha Nu cup de-
bating team will be held at 7:00
o'clock tonight. The question for de-
bate is, "Resolved, That the Federal
Government Should Own and Operate
a Merchant Marine," and tryouts wil
take the form of a 12-minute speech
on this question. All members are
eligible except freshmen, and those
who have been on a winning cup team
in the past.
Dixie Club Will Give l)Dnce Tomorrow
Members of the Dixie club will give
a dance from 9:00 o'clock to 1:00
o'clock tonight at Packard academy.I
Mr. M. C. Wier, of the rhetoric depart-
ment, and Mrs. Wier will act as chap-
erons.

universities, but the new Mid-west
league, formed last May between Wis-
consin, Illinois and Michigan, will
thereby begin its activities. Wiscon-
sin is an old and unsuccessful oppon-
ent, having lost four of the five de-
bates held with Michigan since 1893.
Illinois will. take the negative here
as the affirmative teams of the three
universities will remain at home this
year. Michigan's negative will go to
Wisconsin, and Wisconsin's, to Illi-
nois. Prof. R. D. T. Hollister will ac-
company Michigan's team to Madison
where the Wisconsin clash will take
place.
The judges for the home debate have
not yet been chosen, but the Oratorical
association has succeeded in securing
Senator William Alden Smith, of Mich-
igan, to act as presiding officer. The
subject for debate will be: "Resolved,
That in Anti Trust Legislation, Labor
Unions Should Be Exempt from Con-
struction as Combinations in Restraint
of Trade."
The Michigan teams will be as fol-
lows: Negative-George C. Classen,
'15L, Benn 1F. Gates, '15, Samuel J.
Rosensteen, '15L; affirmative-Harri-
son M. Karr, grad, Victor H. Sugar,
'16, Jacob Levin, '17L.
POSTS FIOURTH LIST
OF 44 CANDIDATES'
Lundgren Announces That He Will
Not Make Any More Public
Cuts from Squad
RELAY RACE FOR BASEBALL MEN
Coach Lundgren has posted his
fourth list of baseball candidates in
Waterman gym, and from this list no
public cuts will be made, it being the
policy of the mentor from now on to
make all his dismissals from the squad
by personal talks with the men.
The new list contains some names
in addition to those which were on
the card at the last cut, a total of 44
candidates still being eligible to work
under Coach Lundgren in the gym.
From this list the coach will pick his
southern squad, and every member of
the squad as now posted, whether he
be cut for indoor practice or not, will
be expected to report at the first out-
door sally of the ball tossers.
It was announced that a relay race
would be arranged for members of the
baseball squad, to be run at the time
of the class track meet. Each team is
to be composed of four men who will
each run one lap of the Waterman gym
track.
The list of candidates and the posi-
tion for which they are trying out fol-
lows:
Catcher-Gardner, Benton, Krauss,
McGraw, Harshman, Gee, Dunne,
Shepard.
Pitcher--Sisler, Davidson, Ferguson,
Soddy, Payette, Cutting,Nichols, Flynn,
McNamara, Toles.
First-Newell, Maltby, Dwyer, Stew-
art.
Second-McQueen, Caswell.
Third-Thomas, Waltz, Calvin, Mar-
tin, Robinson, Shivel, Wurster, Rowan.
Short-Eaton, Warner, Smith, Bran-
dell, Arentz, Anderson.
Outfield-Labadie, Sheehy, Paterson,
Leiserwitz, Taylor, Niemann.

its kind ever held between the two 1 entries than have ever been enrolled

in any former meet held in Water-
man gym. It was decided, after the
entries had closed, to hold the meet at
3:00 o'clock tomorrow afternoon in-
stead of tomorrow night as was origi-
nally planned.
Preliminaries in the quarter, half
and mile distances will be run this af-
ternoon, the half mile preliminaries
being scheduled for 3:30 o'clock to
4:15 o'clock, and the mile and quarter
mile'preliminaries for 4:30 o'clock to
5:15 o'clock. Men who are enrolled in
these events and who do not take part
in the preliminaries at the scheduled
time will not be allowed to take part
in the finals when they are run off to-
morrow afternoon.
The 35-yard dash is the most popu-
lar event, 48 men having entered. It
has a close second in both the quarter
and half mile distances which each
have about 35 entries. The entries in
the pole vault bid fair to have the
feast competition only nine men hav-
ing signed up for that event.
The entries follow:
35-yard dash-Foley, Fischer, Miller,
Stephens, Jones, J. Ziegler, Walsh, E.
Ziegler, Raymond, Brazell, Randall,
Loud, Page, Strauss, Robertson, Kuce-
(Continued on Page 6)
STGE TWO GAMES
WITH LAK 0OFPEP
Fresh Engineers Beat Homeops 30 to
9 in Loosely Staged
Contest
J-DIENTS DEFEAT LAWS 26 To 16
Fresh engineers beat the homeops
in a loosely played basketball game by
a score of 30 to 9. In the only other
game of the evening, the junior dents
beat the J-laws 26 to 16.
Neither the engineers nor the hom-
eops showed good basketball, the hom-
eops being the principal offenders.
They did not score during the first
half and did not seem to realize that
they were playing a game until the
last five minutes of play, when all but
two of their points were made. Maggio
played the best game for the homeops
and Doty led his engineer teammates.
The lineup and summary:
Fresh Eng. (30) , Homeops (9)
Doty.............F . ..Mandeville
Ginn, Haskins.... F........ Schulkin
Corbin...........C....... McKenny
Hough..... ...G..... ........Cady
Beyster.......... G.......... Maggio
Field goals-Doty 5, Ginn 4, Corbin
2, Hough 2, Mandeville, Schulkin, Mc-
(Continued on Page 6)
University Extension Work Slackens
University extension work is slack-
ening up with the coming of warm
weather, but three lectures being
scheduled for next week. Prof. Bever-
ley Robinson, of the architectural col-
lege, will speak in Lansing, March 16,
on, "Cathedrals of England." Prof. F.'
N. Scott, of the rhetoric department,
is to deliver a lecture in Jackson,'
March 18, on the subject, "Books That
Wear, and Books That Wear Out."
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, of thehistory
department, goes to Three Rivers on
March 19, where he will speak on "A
Canoe Voyage From the Black Forest
to the Black Sea."

DEUTSCHER VEREIN OTES IN
LARGE LIST OF NEW MEMBERS
Will Hold Initiation Friday, March 26;
to Stage "Eer Mss Heiraten"
Play Afterwards
At a meeting of the Deutscher Ver-
ein last Wednesday night, the follow-
ing were elected for membership: Rut-
ger H. Cooley, '16; Charles L. Haas,
'17; Edwin F. Sunderman, '15; Albert
Hyma, '15; William Hilzinger; A. T.
Lehman, '17; John F. Pobanz, '18;
Harold J. Sherman, '17; Andrew Ties-
enga, '17; J. E. Simmons, '17; Edwin
A. Hyman, '17; Elizabeth S. Arthur,
'17; Margaret A. Bassett, '17; Lillian
Carnegie, '17; Helen L. Champion, '17;
Albertine G. Loomis, '17; Alice Y. Wil-
ber, '17; Josephine Sherzer, '15; Eliz-
abeth M. McRae, '16; Margaret R. Rey-
nolds, '17; Dorothy Bastian, '17; Hel-
en R. George, '17; Josephine H. Ran-
dall, '17; Beatrice E. Stanton, '15; Le-
na B. Mott, '15; Ethel Vail, '17; Er-
mina G. Fillingham, '16; Harriet K.
Walker, '17.
The initiation will be held in the
Verein rooms at 7:15 o'clock Friday,
March 26. Immediately after the ini-
tiation, the Verein play, "Einer Muss
Heiraten" by Wilhelmi, will be given
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, and will
be followed by a dance in the gym
parlors in honor of the initiates.
The characters for the play have
not been definitely decided upon as yet,
but will be announced later.
McKENZIE WILL SPEAK AT UNION
Proinellt Alumnus' Subject Not Yet
Announced
William Dexter McKenzie, '96, who
is one of Chicago's most prominent
lawyers, has promised definitely to
speak at the Sunday afternoon pro-
gram at the Michigan Union.
The subject for his talk has not yet
been announced, but it will be one of
deep interest to the campus. Infor-
mality is to be especially emphasized
at the rest of the get-togethers of this
semester. Special musical numbers
are. being arranged by Rudolf Hofmann,
'15, and his committee, and these will
be announced soon with the subject
of the address.
CIVIL ENGINEERS DANCE IN
CAMP TOGS AT UNION TONIGHT
Civil engineers, who attended the
annual summer engineering camp at
Camp Davis last summer, and the civ-
il engineering faculty, will dance at
8:0 o'clock tonight at the Union. A
special program of singing and danc-
ing specialties will be given during
the evening, and at midnight a brass
band will give a few selections. The
guests will be dressed in regular camp
style, and although senior civil engi-
neers who were not at the camp last
year have been invited to attend, the
sale of tickets has been limited to
those who were members of that camp.
WENLEY GIVES FOURTH LENTEN
VESPER TALK THIS AFTERNOON
"Man in the Realm of Society,-Vice
and Sin," is the subject of a lecture to
be given this afternoon at 4:30 o'clock
in St. Andrew's Episcopal church by
Prof. R. M. Wenley, of the philosophy
department. This lecture which is in
the development of the subject, "Re-
ligion, a Need in Common Life," is the
fourth of a series of Lenten vesper
talks being given on Friday afternoons
by Professor Wenley.
Pharmies Will Hold Dance at Packard
Members of the College of Pharmacy
have formulated plans for a dance to

be held Wednesday, March 17, at Pack-
ard's academy. The following chair-
men have been appointed to take
charge of the affair: E. H. Woodhouse,
'15P, M. L. Rushmore, '16P, J. I. Mill-
ner, '17P, and H. F. Shaw, '18. "Ike"
Fischer's orchestra has been secured
to furnish the music- for the occasion,
and all students may attend. Tickets
at $1.00 may be obtained from the so-
cial committee or from E. H. Wood-
house, in room 250, chemical building.
Dean Jordan to Be Guest of T-Square
Dean Myra B. Jordan will be the
guest of the T-Square society at its
meeting tonight, which will be held
at the Alpha Phi sorority house. Hazel
I. Quick, '15E, president of the soci-
ety, will give a talk on "What Has
Been Accomplished by Women in Ar-
chitectural and Engineering Lines."
Marion C. Galton and Bertha L. Yerex,
T. Hanchett, '17E, and Ruby M. Miller,
'18A, will each give a reading.

DISCUSS MILITARY
SUBJECT AT FORUM
Hold Interesting Keeting Last NigMt
# Ferum under Leadersi
o01 Karl Molar, ,
"TIME AND MONEY AFFECTED,"
SAYS SAMUEL WITTING, 15L
Toisley Shows That Adoption Would
Foster Democratic Spirit
in University
Military training, a subject under
wide discusion among students and ed-
ucators in all parts of the country, was
the topic at the Forum meeting held
last night at the Union, under the lead-
ership of Karl Mohr,, '15L. "Should
Military Training for Students be In-
troduced at Michigan," was the exact
question up for consideration, but be-
fore it closed the discussion had em-
braced the' entire subject of arma-
ments, warfare and peace.
Samuel Witting, '15, took the floor
on the negative side of the question.
"The student's time as well as his
money would be affected through the
introduction of military drill," he said.
"There are many student at Michigan,
who are working their way through
college, but who would not have the
time to do it, if they were compelled
to take the drill."
F. S. Tousley, '15, a supporter of
military training talked show-
ing that it would not prevent but
would foster the democratic spir-
it in university life. "As far as the ad-
ded cost of military training in time
and money is concerned," he said, "the
lowered cost of tuition which would ac-
company the introduction of the sys-
tem would more than compensate the
money spent for uniforms and the
time spent in drilling."'
"When you deal with military trailn-
ing in the universities you are med-
dling with fire," said F. E. Loudy, 'iSE.
SELECT VAUGHAN AS CHAIRMAN
To Preside at Lecture Monday Night
Given by Gardner
Dean V. C. Vaughan, of the Medical
School, has been selected as chairman
for Congressman A. P. Gardner's lec-
ture on "Safety First,-Is America
Prepared Against War," to be given at
the. Whitney theater next Monday
night.
That possibly the munition and arms
factories are behind the movement for
establishing military training in the
universities of this country, was the
startling conjecture offered by a stu-
dent during the discussion on military
training at the Forum last night.
An informal dinner for Mr. Gardner
will be held at the Union next Mon-
day night.
Tickets for the lecture are now on
sale at Wahr's, the Union and the
Whitney for 35 cents each for any
seat.
Y. N. C. A. DEPUTATION TEAM TO
JOURNEY TO CROSWELL TODAY
Leaving at 5:00 o'clock this morn-
ing, the Y. M. C. A. deputation team,
composed of Mr. W. H. Tinker, Ray-
mond E. Flynn, '17L, Lewis C. Rei-
mann, '17L, Waldo R. Hunt, '16L, and
Philip C. Lovejoy, '16L, will go to
Croswell, Michigan where they will at-
tend a county convention of high

school boys. The first meeting will
be held Friday afternoon, when Rei-
mann will speak on, "Playing the
Game."
Bishop McDowell Will Lecture Sunday
Bishop William F. McDowell, of the
Methodist Episcopal church, has been
secured as the Wesleyan Guild lectur-
er for this week, and he will deliver
an address in the Methodist church
at 7:30 o'clock next Sunday evening.
As a speaker, Bishop McDowell is
well known to students throughout the
United States. He is also a familiar
figure to Ann Arbor audiences, this be-
ing the tenth time that he has appear-
ed before the people of this city.
Final Union Bridge Contest, Tonight
Contestants in the Michigan Union
Bridge tourney, will battle out the
last round in the series at the Union,
at 7:30 o'clock tonight. After a "make-
up" of back games held yesterday af-
ternoon, all men are caught up.

"THE LIVEST LECTURE OF THE YEAR"
C 0 N 0 K0 E S S M A N
GAR.DNER
ON
"IS AMERICA PREPARED AGAINST WAR?"
WHITNEY THEATIE NEXT MONDAY EVE.
35c" Ct That Ticket Now at Wahr's, Union or Whitney 35C.

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