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March 09, 1915 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-03-09

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'he

ERY MORNING
$1.50

i higan

Daily

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Nn 112

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 1915.

PRICE FIVE C

kN

..______________________

INS OF TEAM
SFIESFARRELL
Construction of Madison
re Garden Track Acts
as Handicap on
Wolverines
LRS IN 1,000-YARD
NCE OF MEDLEY RELAY'
ins Pointing Men for Meet
Syracuse Saturday
Night
with the showing made by
an relay teams at Madison
rden in New York Saturday
ch Farrell has now turned
>n to preparing for the Syr-
. The Wolverines meet the
next Saturday night in Syr-
's medley relay squad fin-
1, and the 4,000-yard team
e Madison Square Garden
'anged without banks at the
h is a big handicap to those
with running there. The
squad, which finished first
in the two races, has been
Z the Garden for several
has a track similar to the
n their own gym. The 4,000-
squad which ran for Dart-
never been beaten in the

printers, and those
who were not used
at a big disadvan-'
o ran the first lap
ted Captain Smith
in front of hm. The
of the men on the
ay and was racing
Donald Lippincott,
rhauled, when the
rve. Both shot' off
uishing the lead.
ed that Smith gain-
the straightaways,
lost all that he had

TODAY
James F. J. Archibald gives an illus-
trated lecture on the European war
in Hill auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Cabinet club dinner at Union, 6:00
o'clock. .
TOMORROW
Mr. Van Noppen lectures in 206 Tap-
pan hall, 4:15 o'clock.
Mr. Van Noppen lectures in Alumni
Memorial hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Intercollegiate Socialist association
will meet in the Adelphi rooms, 7:30
o'clock.
Faculty night of the economic depart-
ment at the Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Minnesota Club to He Organized Soon
Minnesota will soon be represented
among the campus sectional clubs, if
the plans of several Gopher State en-
.thusiasts materialize. Students from
Minnesota, both men and women to
the number of 45, will be eligible. J.
B. Barker, '16, N. A. Cook, '17E, and
C. S. Lamb, '18, will answer any in-
quiries.
OUTLIE FEATURES
oF CLUBSREGATTA
Annual Festivities on Huron by Union
Boat Club Scheduled for
May 28 and 29
PLAN CHAMPIONSHIP CREW RACE
Championship crew racing between
the Detroit and Grand Rapids Boat
clubs will probably be the main fea-
ture: at the Union 'Boat club's annual
regatta, to be staged on the Huron riv-
er on May 28 and 29. This was in-
formally announced at a meeting of
regatta chairmen in the Union club-
house Sundlay morning. ;
According to present plans, tem-
porary bleachers and refreshment
stands will be erected along the shores
of the river, and numerous benches
will'be provited. Efforts will be made
to secure special trains to the grounds,
also to insure sufficient car line and
bus line facilities. If permission can
be obtained, the old chute between
Barton and Argo ponds will be re-
opened under supervision, for the
easier passage of canoes. The water
marathon will start at Lakeland in
the morning, so that the finish will
occur during the midst of the after-
noon program on Barton pond, where
the most of the regatta will probably
ocur.
Special attention will be given to
make the ev-ening carnival a success.
Cooperation is being solicited among
the honor societies, tfe Mimes, the
Varsity bandi and other organizations.
Definite budg ets will be granted with-
in a few-days for each committee, and
the whole w ork of which Harold J.
Smith, '16E,'is in charge, is to be push-
ed vigorously.
TO ELECT CLASS DAY OFFICERS
AND CONS DER MEMORIAL FUND
Election of .class day officers will be
held by the senior its at .their meeting
at 4:00 o'clock tomorrow afternoon in
Tappan halL The offices of poet, ora-
tor, prophet and historian are to be

filled. Definite action will probably be
taken in regard to the theater memo-
rial plan, brought up at the last class
meeting.
Soph Engineers Dance Thursday Night
Sophomore engineers will hold their
dance Thursday night at the Michigan
Union, instead of Friday night as was
announced in the Sunday issue of The
Daily. The "Ragpicker's Quartet"
will furnish, the music.

MilEET FORLAlSSES
(Competition Not Open to Wearers of
Varsity or Class
Insignia

LESSENS SQUAD r 9[4L H OFT
BASEBALL TRYOUJTS
Third Cut in Size of Varsity Body
Reduces Number of Aspirants
to List of 44

FRESHI ITS WIN FROM JUNIORS
Senior Dents Beat Fresh Medics and
116 Engineers Outplay Laws'
After taking things easy in the first
half, the fresh lit basketball team ran
away from the junior lits last night,
the game ending with the score 31 to
12 in favor of the first year men. This

James Archibald Who Speaks
Auditorium ilonight Spen
Four Months in Active
Service at Front

A WARD NUMERALS FOR PLACES1 DAVIDSON REJOINS CANDIDATES

Iwas the first of the games to decideI

on -ran about even, and Ufer
the last lap in fifth. place.
running was the feature of
igan race, the 1,000-yard run-
ing two men, and gaining con-
y on both Pennsylvania and
th. Ufer ran a wonderful
I easily featured the Michigan
owing.
oach has not decided how
en he will take to Syracuse.
ad will leave Friday from
ndications.
EN FOR FRENCH PLAY;
WANN TO HOLD TRYOUTS
V.Wann, instructor in French,
oaching the cast for the Cer-
icais play, "La Poudre aux
ays that a number of men's
on the cast remain vacant.
who has a knowledge of
whether enrolled in a French
r not, has a chance to try out
'acancies. The women's parts'
,n filled satisfactorily.
HON DANCES FEATURE
H LAW'S PARTY THURSDAY
elle Chamberlain, formerly of
k, has been secured to give a
of exhibition dances at the
w dance, which will be held
)0 to 12:00 o'clock Thursday
at Granger's. Although the
not restricted to members of
s, a limited number of tickets
old. They are on sale at $1.00
he Union.
Meeting to Herr Four Papers
's Harry B. Schmidt, Albert M.
Ward F. Seeley and Howard
rings will read, papers at the
y monthly meeting of the
society at 7:30 o'clock tomor-
ing, in the medical amphithe-
he university hospital.

Michigan's "Dub" track meet will be
postponed for the period of one week,
and in its place Intramural Director
Rowe. has planned an interclass track
meet to be held next Saturday. The
men who win firsts, seconds and thirds
in this meet are to receive class num-
rals, and the winning class will be
considered campus champions.
The restrictions on eligibility are
made light in order that a large entry
list may be obtained. All men who
are not on probation are eligible
wvith the exception of "M" men,.
"A. \L A." men and men who
have won either their fresh or
soph numerals this year. The men
who win numerals in this meet will be
held in the light of numeral men from
then on, thus barring their entry in
the "Dub" track meet scheduled for a'
week later, only men who have won'
no athletic recognition being eligible
for the latter.
All men who are eligible for the
meet are requested to sign up for their
events on the enrollment card which is
posted in Waterman gym. If the num-
ber of entries grows too large it may
be necessary to close them before the
end of the week,, but unless this hap-
pens the men can enroll for the meet
at any time up to Friday night.
According to present plans the pro-i
gram will include all of the regular3
indoor track events except the relay1
races, which are being run off underE
a different system. Dr. May will actI
in the capacity of starter and referee.
WANT SPIKES FOR INDOOR TRACK
Cornell and Pennsylvania in Favor of:
New Practice ,
Owing to the recent ijuries that
several track stars have sustained in-
doors, Pennsylvania, Cornell, and sev-
eral other eastern institutions, are re-
fusing to compete over the boards un-
less spikes are' allowed. .
Spikes indoors have been practical-
ly unheard of here at Michigan. In
fact, when the university decided to
enter Captain Smith and O'Brien in1
the dashes at Madison Square Garden
in New York at the senior indoor
A. A. U. meet, the ldcal sprinters had
to practice in the third floor of an
Ann Arbor. residence to become famil-
ar with the indoor spikes. Both run-
ners declared that they were of big
assistance.
Pennsylvania and Cornell have both
suffered from losing men who have
sustained bad falls indoors, and as a
result are taking this new action. Har-
vard's stand in the matter is of less
importance, but Cornell and Penn-
sylvania are the recognized track au-
thorities of the east.
Dismiss Lamond, '17, from Hospital
Roy D. Lamond, '17, who has been
sick at the university hospital for the
last two weeks with pleuro-pneumo-
nia, was discharged Sunday. He will
be unable to continue his college work
this semester, but is planning to come
back for summer school.
Rev. Tatlock Conducts Lenten Service
"Characteristics of the Four Gos-
pels" is the subject of a Lenten service
addr.ess which will be given by the
Rev. Henry Tatlock, at 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon in St. Andrew's church.
Senate Council Postpones Meeting
Members of the senate council did
not meet last night, as was scheduled,
but will hold their March meeting next
Monday night.

Coach Lundgren wielded the axe
yesterday afternoon after the Varsity
baseball practice, eight of the candi-
dates for this year's team falling be-
fore his third onslaught, which reduc-
ed the number of men on the squad to
a total of 44 candidates for positions.
The inroads were confined to the out-
field and the battery and short-stop
candidates. .
"Bill" Davidson returned to the
squad yesterday afternoon after an
absence of a week, during which time
*he has been on the coach's sick list.
Work in the cage lasted for an hour
and a half yesterday afternoon, the
pitchers being allowed for the first
time to show what they had in the
way of fancy curves. Nichols has
been showing well in the straight ball
practice, and after yesterday's work-
out, when the first line could be gain-
ed on his ability to put over the curv-
ed ones, he seems to be about the most
promising of the non-veteran candi-
dates for the pitching staff. The field-
ing practice which followed the work
in the batting cage was run through
in a snappy fashion.
The list of men who escaped the
coach's pruning knife follows: Gard-
ner, Benton, Krauss, McGraw, Harsh-
man, Shepard, Gee, Sisler,' Ferguson,
Davidson, Soddy, Payette, Flynn, Mc-
Namara, Toles, Nichols, Cutting, Dwy-
er, Stewart, Newell, Maltby, McQueen,"
Caswell, R. Johnston, Hughitt, Thom-,
as, Calvin, Waltz, Martin, Robinson,
Shivel, Wurster, Eaton, Warner, R. C.-
Smith, Brandell, Arentz, Anderson,
Labadie, Sheehy, Paterson, Leiserwitz,1
Taylor, Neiman.
TO GIVE CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS,
Various Positions Open with Good Sal-
aries and Opportunities
United States civil service examina-
tions have been announced for a large
number of government positions, the
examinations to be given at various
cities in this district, during the next
two months.'
The civil service commission empha-
sizes the fact that it has been unable'
to secure enough male stenographers
and typists at Washington, D. C. The
salaries of these' positions runs from
$840 to $940, with good opportunities
for advancement.
Some of the positions open, and the
time of examination follow: Chemical
engineers-$1,800 to $2,000, March 30;
technical assistant in pharmacology-
$2,000, April 6; expert mechanician-
$1,400 to' $1,800, March 17; gardening
specialist-$3,000, April 6.
Persons desiring particulars regard-
ing the examinations may secure com-
plete information by addressing the
United States civil service commission,
Washington, D. C.
Library Receives 12 0. Henry Volumes
In addition to a set of 0. Henry in
12 volumes,.the university library re-
ceived more than 150 books from Ger-
many yesterday. This is the second
set of 0. Henry received in the last
two weeks, and was purchased to meet
the large demand for this author,
which has sprung up during the past
few months.
Engagement of Irene McFadden, '12
Irene McFadden, '12, a member of
Pi Beta Phi sorority, has announced
her engagement to George Bowman
Vingston, '12-'.14L. , Mr. Vlngston is
engaged in the practice of law at
Grand Rapids.

the championship in the- lit division.
The senior dents beat the fresh med-
ics, the count being 17 to seven. The
junior engineers set the juniors of the
law department down a notch, the to-
tals being 18 to eight.
The fresh lits outclassed the junior
team. The winners scored 14 field
goals in the game, 11 df these coming
in the second half. Nathan and Drum-
mond were the chief point-getters for
-the 1918 men, while Warner occupied
the chief role for the losers.
Neither the senior dents nor the jun-
ior engineers found much trouble in
defeating their opponents. Melvin
starred for the dent men, and Watson
was the big noise for the medics. Von-
achen played his usual good game
against the junior laws, for which ag-
gregation Melaniphy did the best
work.
VAN NOPPEN GIVES,
LECT.U.RE ON DUTCH,

Moving pictures taken on the f
line, interspersed with actual pers
experiences at the front, will i
James F. J. Archibald's lecture or
European war, to be given in Hil
ditorium at 8:00 o'clock tonight, o
the most interesting discussion
the present conflict given in Ann
bor. The lecture is given for the
efit of the Polish relief fund.
Mr. Archibald's position as war
respondent has given him the o]
tunity to become the best info
person now in this country on the
man-Austrian phase of the gig
conflict that is now being wage
Europe. After four months of a
service at the front, Mr. Arch
comes to Ann Arbor prepared to
the first authoritative uncensore
count of the war.
While he has seen only the Gei
and Austrian side of the conflict
Archibald's talk will be strictly

WAR REPRTERET
TELL EXPEHt ENG

Columbia Uniyersity Speaker Tells of
Influence of Holland on
America
TO CONTINUE TALKS TOMORROW
Mr. Leonard C. Van Noppen, Qdeen.
Wilhemina lecturer of Germanic lan-
guages at Columbia university, spoke
in Memorial hall last night on "The
Dutch Renaissance, with Sbme Ref-
erence to Holland's influence on Mod-
ern Civilization and on American In-
stitutions."
He gave a brief characterization of
the Dutch people, followed by a short
resume of Dutch history, showing the
large influence Holland has had on
other nations. He said that to Hol-
land, America owes her fornulated
ideal of liberty, plan of government,
secret ballot and supreme court.
Mr. Van Noppen gave a summary of
the principle poets in Dutch litera-
ture, which serves to introduce his
lecture at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow af-
ternoon in Memorial hall, on "Vondel,
the Dutch Shakespeare, with a Dis-
cussion of His Contemporaries." His
last lecture will be at 8:00 o'clock to-
morrow evening, on "Van Eden, the
Dutch Tolstoi, and the Literature
since 1880."
ALTER AWARDS TO HOCKEY MEN
Plans for Amendment of Constitution
Submitted for Consideration
Because the insignia granted to last
year's winning hockey team was
thought to resemble a skull and cross-
hones, the board of directorsl of the
athlettc association voted yesterday to
award this year's winners black jer-
seys, bearing numerals only.
Plans for the amendment of the
constitution of the athletic association'
to prevent a repetition of the ineligi-
bility trouble which occurred at the.
last election, were presented by the
committee of the board, and it is prob-
able that they will be added to the
constitution at the next meeting.
It was decided to hold meetings of
the ;board at 4:30 o'clock on Thursday
afternoon hereafter, instead of Mon-
day.
Junior Laws to Give Smoker Thursday
Junior laws will hold a smoker
Thursday evening at the Union. Pro-
fessors E. Holbrook and T. A. Bogle,
of the Law School, will be the speakers'
of the evening, while L. J. Scanlon,
'16L, and H. C. Rummel, '14-'16L, will
furnish the musical attraction.

WILL 5110W MOVING PICTURE
OF SCENES FROM FIRING'
Lecture Being (iven for Rene
Campaign for Relief Work
in Poland

U

JAMES F. J. ARCHIBALD.
tral in its attitude, his position a
officer in the United States army
ing this feature of his lecture
more official in its nature.
Mr. Archibald stands in the
rank of war correspondents, whc
now at the front, tonight's lee
having seen probably more actua:
vice than any other American r
sentative, with the possible excer
of Frederick Palmer and Ric
Harding Davis.
While actual battle scenes for
large part of the second part o
evening, which is to be devoted t
moving pictures, Mr. Archibald
especial emphasis in his lecture o
strange alliances that have
brought about by the recent dev
nents in Europe.
"In commenting on the cam
for funds," said Prof. L. C. Karp
member of.the Polish relief com
yesterday, "it is well to note tha
official Rockefeller commission rE
ed that the conditions in Poland
worse than in Belgium, and in
need of relief." The seats for th
ture tonight are on sale for f
ranging fiom 15 to 75 cents.

..,.r...r MIM -M-
.,

P6C.I8 H,

RELIEF BENEFIT

BI-LLt

Moving

War

Pictures

AUDITORI!

11

F. J. A, Correspondent SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE

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