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March 07, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-03-07

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DAILYI
WORKING

he

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE
NOW

,:

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 7, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

. .. r -

K

ULL UNITS
ITURENEW'T'

rate Organizations
In Various
Schools
Ileges
T WILL HAVE
ALL ACTIVITIES

of Five
100 I

Bear

rtmental Y. M. C. A.'s
the features of the
plans which the uni-
A. expects to put into
e close of the coming
he scheme, as outlined
e of the "Y" cabinet,
separate organization
ollege, the Law School,
hool, the Colleges of
3 Architecture, and the
.s and colleges. A sep-
body or cabinet will
of each organization
t will be made up of a
-president, secretary,
ogether with the chair-
: standing committees
feature of each of the

TODAY
Albert Parker Fitch will speak at the
Majestic theater, 6:00 o'clock.
Henry R. Pattengill will speak on "The
Citizens' Try-Square" at the Union,
3:00 o'clock.
Bishop G. M. Williams will speak on
"One of God's Noblemen" at St. An-
drew's church, 7:30 o'clock.
Bishop G. M. Williams speaks at St.
Andrew's Episcopal church, 10:30
o'clock.
Rev. Frank B. Bachelor speaks at First
Baptist church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. R. S. Loring speaks on "Being a
Good Mixer" at Unitarian church,
10:30 o'clock.
Rev. Leonard A. Barrett speaks at
Presbyterian church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. George Knepper speaks on "The
Discipline of Life" at Church of
Christ, 10:30 o'clock.
Albert Parker Fitch will deliver the
sermon at the First Congregational
church, 10:30 o'clock. .
Rev. A. W. Stalker speaks at First M.
E. church, 10:30 o'clock.
Mr. Henry. R. Pattengill speaks on
"The Arid Zone" at Presbyterian
church, 7:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Mr. A. L. Weeks of the Detroit News
lectures on journalism in room 203,
University hall, 2:00 o'clock.'.
Prof. Van Notten lectures in Alumni
Memorial hall, 8:00 o'clock.
FITCH TO' SPEAKAT
LAST 'Y" MEETiNG

COACH SPEEDS *UP
BASEBALL PRACTICE

CUT PROMISED FOR. NEXT WEEK TWO MAIN BOUTS CLEAN FALLS

units will be
al cabinet by
abinet will be
d committee-
pus at large.
h will be the
entire organi-
each month.
hold weekly
charge of all
s in their re-
schools, and,
e up of men.

of Andover Talks{
Jeth Century Man'sa
ception of Christ"

REIMANN GARNERS
HEAVYWEIGHT CUP
Amtsbuechler, Tuttle and Walls Pull
Down Three Other Wrestlhig
Championships

Battery Tryess Given Full
Hours' Drill on Return of
Lundgren

Two[

on "The
Con-

NOMINATING COMMITTEEI

dad

.sid- As the speaker for the last "Y" Ma-
re- jestic meeting to be held this year,
the at 6:30 o'clock tonight, the Y.
.tter M. C. A. officials have secured Dr. Al-
s of bert Parker Fitch, president of And-
col- over Theological seminary at Cam-
be bridge, Mass. Dr. Fitch will take as
y to his subject, "The Modern Twentieth
Century Man's Conception of Christ,"
iiza- and he will endeavor to point out the
the place which the teachings of Christ
the deserve in the life of the modern man.
ship At this meeting, the election of a
ach committee of three men will be held,
the and this committee, in conjunction
"Y" with a like number of the men now in
or the Y. M. C. A. cabinet, will meet
sometime this week to make nomina-
tions for the officers of the "Y" for the
coming year.

Coach Lundgren's Varsity baseball
candidates paid the penalty for Fri-
day's day of comparative leisure yes-
terday afternoon when their mentor
returned after two days' absence and
sent them through the stiffest drill
that the squad has had so far this
year.
The usual work of 90 minutes in the
batting cage was lengthened to a full
two hours of work for the battery t y--
outs, and the batters each took several
turns at facing the pitcher, in addi-
tion to what has formerly been the
regular quota. With the return of the
coach, however, the number of candi-
dates, attending practice took a lap
upwards and prevented overworking
the men.
With the close of the regular two
hour practice period the cage was
hoisted. The Michigan coach put his
men through some ihore of their paces
before he sent them home, the fungo
hitters keeping the candidates busy
fielding hot grounders for another half
hour.
Another cut in the size of the squad
is promised for some time liext week,
and it will come as early as the coach
can separate the sheep from the goats.
BlIOP (e. i. WLLIAMS SPEAKS
Episcopalian Prelate Will Close Bald-
win Series Tonight
Bishop G. Mott Williams of the
Episcopal diocese of Marquette, will
deliver the last of the Baldwin lec-
tures for this year in St. Andrew's
Episcopal church at 7:30 o'clock to-
night, on "One of God's Noblemen,"
and in his address will pay a tribute
to the late Bishop Hobart, one of the
pioneer bishops of Michigan.
In the House of Bishops, which is
the governing body of the Episcopal
church, Bishop Williams has been hon-
ored by being placed in -charge of all
the Protestant Episcopal churches
scattered throughout Europe. On ac-
count of t.he present war, this makes
him an important man in the. Ameri-
can church.
Bishop Williams will also speak at
the morning service, at 10:30 o'clock
in St. Andrew's church.
YALE REQUESTS TENNIS MATCH
Captain Reindel not Sure He Can Place
Eli on This Year's Schedule
With Michigan's tennis schedule well
defined and all arrangements made ex-
cept the signing of contracts, word
comes from Yale that the Eli tennis
squad is looking for another match
with Michigan.
Yale last year succeeded in making
a clean sweep of the Wolverine rac-
quet wielders. Its request this year
is for one or two matches, but it comes
so late in the year that Captain Ira
Reindel expressed himself as very
doubtful of the ability of the schedule
maker to date a game with the east-
ern institution.
PROGRESS MADE AT REHEARSAL
OF OPERA SATISFIES SANGER
Both cast and chorus of 'the Union
opera held a rehearsal at McMillan
hall yesterday afternoon, and the en-
tire play was gone over. Director
Sanger expressed himself as satisfied
with the progress of the comedy thus.
far.
Constant rehearsals have been held
during the past week, and a few new
songs have been added to the list. It
is not yet known when the final selec-
tions for the cast and chorus will be
made, as several new cast men have
been developed.

In the finals of the wrestling tourna-
ment, which decided the champions of
the university yesterday, Reiman was
returned winner of the heavyweight
class, Amtsbuechler of the middle-
weight division, Tuttle of the welter-
weight class, while Walls won the de-
cision in the lightweight tilt.
Before a crowd that covered the
gym floor, the Michigan wrestling tit-
les were decided in four of the best
bouts of the season. Reimann and
Amtsbuechler won their contests by
clean .falls, Tuttle and Walls receiv-
ing the decisions of the judges after
their respective contests had waged
the full 30 minutes without a fall.
The Reimann-Weske contest was at-
tended with particular interest. After
10 minutes of fast work, the Varsity
football man pinned his opponent to
the mat with a combination scissors
and half Nelson, winning the heavy-
weight title.
In the middleweight division, Amts-
buechler disposed of Pittsley in short
order, throwing the latter in the rec-
ord tue of aminute and 15seconds.
Pittsley fell victim to a combination
quarter Nelson and leg lock.
In both the welterweight and light-
weight bouts, Referee Watson selected
three judges from the crowd, who de-
cided the winners upon points. Tuttle
worked over Crandall for the greater
part of the 30 minutes, and although
he was unable to throw his opponent,
he clei.rly earned the decision which
the judges awarded him.
Walls took the lightweight title from
Baker, although he was unable to win
by a fall. Baker was on the defense
for the greater portion of the time, and
Walls was .given the decision by the
judges on his aggressiveness.
E. E. Traub and A. McIsaac were
timekeepers. The winners were
awarded a cup and their numerals.
TODAY'S UNION SPEAKER ONCE
RAN FOR STATE GOERNO 'SHIP
Henry Pattengill,. of Lansing, Speaks
on "The Citizen's Try-
Square"
Henry R: Pattengill, of Lansing, who
is to speak on "The Citizen's Try-
Square" at the Union gathering at 3:00
o'clock today, was candidate for gov-
ernor on the Progressive ticket at the
recent election. He is said to be one of
the best speakers in the state.
Mr. Pattengill is editor and pub-
lisher of "Moderator Topics," the offi-
cial organ of the department of public
instruction and of the State Teachers'
association. He is also president of
the Christian sociology class of the
First Baptist church of Lansing.
The musical program for the after-
noon has not been decided upon.
LYMAN L. BRYSON OPERATED
ON AT UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL
Lyman L. Bryson, instructor in rhet-
oric, was operated for acute mastoids
at the university hospital yesterday.
He was reported as resting comforta-
bly last night.
Mr. Bryson has been in the hospital
for the past week, suffering from ear
trouble.
Mawson, Lecturer, Offers Self for War
Sir Douglas Mawson, who delivered
a lecture in Ann Arbor a few weeks
ago, will probably take part in the
present war, according to latest re-
ports. Mr. Mawson has offered his
services and will likely serve as an
officer.- More than 30 members of his
expedition party are now fighting in
Egypt. He will sail from San Francis-
co for Australia on March 16.

JAMES R. PATTENGILL,
who speaks at Union meeting this af-
ternoon and before Presby-
terian church tonight.
CONSIDER HOLDING OF EXHIBIT
Graduate Employment Bureau Will be
Discussed Thursday
Decision as to whether or not the
engineering exhibit will be held this
year, will probably be made, and an
employment bureau for graduates
from the engineering college will be
discussed at a conference- of Dean M.
E. Cooley and the standing committee
of that college, on Thursday. The
meeting is deferred until Thursday be-
cause Dean Cooley will be out of the
city until that time.
. *
SELL TICESFOR
G ARDNERLECTURE
Pasteboards to 'Safety First" Talk Go'
on Sale Wednesday at
$5 Cents
THINKS AMMUNITION LACKING
Tickets for Congressman A.. P.
Gardner's lecture on "Safety First--Is,
America Prepared Against War?" to
be given at the Whitney theater on
March 15, will be put on sale Wednes-
day at Wahr's, the Michigan Union and
the Whitney at 35 cents each.
Quoting as his authority General
Weaver, Mr. Gardner says, "the proper
allowance- is two hours' ammunition
for each of our coast defense guns,
instead of one hour. At the present
rate of appropriation, it will be 18
years before we will have ammunition
for our coast defense guns to last even
one hour."
In discussing the safety of our sea-
coast cities, Mr. Gardner says, "I am
not convinced that these cities are safe
from bombardment by the npw British
and German super-dreadnoughts with
their long range guns."
ROWE GIVES COMING WEEK'S
CLASS BASKETBALL SCHDULE
With the basketball situation com-
plicated by the tied positiona of the
freshman, sophomore and junior lit
teams, Intramural Director Rowe has
announced the schedule for the coming
week. The following is the schedule:
Monday, 7:15-Fresh lits vs. junior'
lits; junior engineers vs. junior laws.
8:05-Fresh medics vs. senior dents;
soph lits vs. architects (practice).
Tuesday, 7:15-Fresh engineers vs.
senior laws; fresh laws vs. pharmics.
8:05-Homeops vs. junior dents; soph
medics vs. fresh dents.
Wednesday, 7:15-Soph lits vs. fresh
lits; soph engineers vs. senior engi-
neers. 8:05-Junior engineers vs. ar-
chitects; fresh medics vs. junior laws.
Thursday, 7:15-Junior dents vs.
senior laws (practice). .8:05-Fresh
engineers vs. homeops (practice).
Friday, 7:15-Soph lits vs. junior
lits; soph engineers vs. pharmis. 8:05
-Fresh medics vs. architects; soph
medics vs. fresh laws.

WOLERINES THIRD
IN MEOLTYIRELA
Pennsylvania Finishes First, Running
Course in 4:22 2.5, with Dart-
mouth Second at
Intercollegiate
MICHIGAN REPRESENTATIVES DO
NOT PLACE IN 4,000-YARD RUN
D)artmouth, Yale and Cornell Take
First Three Positions in
Speedy Race
Dispatches received here from Madi-
son Square Garden in New York City
late last night, state that Michigan
finished third in the indoor Eastern
Intercollegiate medley relay race,
Pennsylvania taking first place in 4
minutes, 22 3-5 seconds, with Dart-
mouth second.
In the 4,000-yard relay, the Wolver-
nes failed to place, Dartmouth finish-
ing first, with Yale second and Cornell
third in a 9:22 2-5 pace.
There were no less than 11 entries
in the medley relay, all of the prin-
cipal eastern colleges sending repre-
sentatives. Announcement was made
that no heats would be staged, which
meant that the teams would have to
start in a bunch. O'Brien was running
the first lap for the Michigan quartet,
with Captain Smith caring for the
second distance, Max Robinson, the
recently discovered phenom was run-
ning third, with the fourth runner un-
decided by Coach Farrell until the last
minute.
The showing made by the Wolverine
aggregation would indicate that Ufer
had been placed on the medley aggre-
gation. Pennsylvania and Dartmouth,
the two teams which nosed out the
Michigan runners, were highly touted
and greatly respected before the meet.
Pennsylvania had two Olympic run-
ners to select if necessary, and eTed
Meredith was in all probability cho
en to run the final lap for the Quakers
Ted is probably the fastest man in th
world at this 1,000-yard distance, al-
though he could have been placed at
the 500-yard lap, at which distance he
is almost unbeatable.
The time in the 4,000-yard relay of
9-:22 2-5 is exceptionally fast. The
fact that the Princeton team does not
show in the summary of this event
would indicate that the Tigers had en-
tered some other race, for they recently
defeated Yale badly over the two-mie
route, with the same team that wal-
loped the Michigan team in Watermat
gym.
STUDENT COUNCIL TO DISCUSS
VIEWS GIVEN AT LAST FORUM
Advisability of Circulating Petition fo
Fire Escapes on North Wing.,
to Come Up
Student councilmen, at their nexi
meeting Tuesday night, will discus
the views of the body which were ad-
vanced at the last student Forum a
the? Michigan Union. This may lead t
some important changes in the policie
of the council,
One question to come up is the- advis
ability of circulating a petition among
the students, to have fire escapes pu
on the north wing of University hall
It has been pointed out that the nar
row stairways and the large numbe&
who attend classes in the wing, wou<
make a hazardous situation in case. o
a fire breaking out.
HOCKEY CONTEST POSTPONED;
WILL BE PLAYED MONDAY NIGHI

Because of unforeseen circumstances
the hockey game scheduled for las
night between Portage Lake and a
picked team of students from Duluth
and other cities has been postponed
until 8:45 o'clock tomorrow night, a
Weinberg's rink. The line-up for
Portage Lake is as follows: Cochran
goal; Kneebone, P.; Waara, C. P.; Alt
center; Funkey, rover; Ratz, righ
wing; Chynoweth, left wing.

1 fellow:
200, in e
>lder of
of the
college

CA I"

be Held

gill, candidate for
on the Progressive
m secured to speak
ght at the Presby-
the subject, "The
'attengill will deal
subject of prohibi-
nake special refer-
ght Five-Mile 'act,
the legislature.
ng on the bill will
sing on March 17,
night, which is be-
committee of local
a active in further-
prohibition in Ann
purpose of stirring
oming hearing, and
elegation of towns-
s to go to Lansing'
bill. The meeting
e auspices of the
herhood, and the

STARKS ROBBERY CASE RESTS,
WITH CHIEF OF POLICE AWAY
No new developments have come to
light in the Starks-McCauley robbery
case since Chief John Kenny left for
Indianapolis with extradition papers
for the negro who is suspected of hav-
ing planned the whole affair in order
to get Starks out of his way.
When he left, the head of the local
police department expected to return
tonight or tomorrow morning, although
unexpected delay either at Lansing or
Indianapolis may keep him another
day.
Harvard Hopes to Better Position
Harvard students are dissatisfied
with the showing that the Crimson
made last spring at the eastern inter-
collegiate track meet, and are deter-
mined to better their position this sea-
son if possible. The Cambridge insti-
tution ranked far down the list, so that
an effort is being made to arouse
greater enthusiasm among the stu-
dents.

Movies 6:00

"Y" Majestic Meeting

ALBERT PARKER FITCH

"What must a
20th Century
Scholar think
of Christ ?"

In

President Andover Theological Seminary

.. ....
.,, .

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