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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 05, 1915 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN L)AiLY

._

Spring Showing of
STEIN BLOCH SUITS

w

February Cut

Price

Sale

IMPERIAL HATS

and all the new shapes and colors in
CAPS

iI

February is the month that we cut prices down. to rock-bottom.
This is the time to buy. Be on hand so that you can take ad-
vantage of these wonderful money -saving bargais in Suits, Over-
coats, Hats and Caps, Sweaters, Smoking Jackets and Bath Robes.

I

Lindenscbmitt, Ap & Co.

:fem...

DIETERLE AND RUNDELL
TAILORS
NINTY-FOUR WEST FORT STREET
DETROIT, MICH.
FORMERLY WM. E. DIETERLE
SPRING ORDERS TAKEN NOW

.
i r.r..nM

Satisfy that animal instinct with
DEAN'S
Fresh Roasted
Peanuts

A FULL
POUND

214 S. Main S t

Electrical engineers, who plan to
hold their spring tour of inspection
through the eastern states during the
Easter vacation, will meet the first of
next week to make arrangements for
the trip.
-Copy for the March issue of the
Michigan Technic has been sent to the
printers and the magazine is expected
to appear in about two weeks.
-Senior engineers, who announced a
few days ago that a dance would be
given by the class.at the Union on
March 19, have postponed the affair
until after the Easter vacation. The
class, will hold a dinner at the Union
Thursday, March 18.
MecQ EEN LEFT IN ,CHARGE OF
SQUAD FOR HALF-DAY'S DRIL
Batting Workout Occupies Afternoon,
Honey, Fresh Dent, Makes
First Appearance
Coach Lundgren's Varsity baseball
squad worked half way through the
regular afternoon session at Water-
man gym yesterday afternoon without
the guiding influence of its mentor, the
coach leaving the squad early in the
afternoon in charge of Captain Mc-
Queen.
Batting practice alone occupied the
time of the candidates, the workout
being confined to slugging practice in
the cage, and the results being appre-
ciably better in the number of times
that the men could take their turn at
bat, due to the recent cut in the size of
the squad.
Honey, a fresh dent, made his initial
appearance with the squad, taking his
place in the batting cage at the deliv-
ery end, working for a good part of
the afternoon at putting over straight
ones to the batters.
PRESS OF WORK NECESSITATES
NEW EMPLOYMENT SECRETARY

Results Count
Continued re-orders prove the
quality and merit of our work in
both Portrait and Commercial De-
partments.
Our satisfied customers are our
biggest advertisement. S ee us
about your work; wea compete
with one and all.
We have recently received a fine
new lot of Moldings, and are mak-
ing a specialty of artistic picture
framing.
Films developed for isc per roll. Prints
' made from 3c upwards
.HOPPE'S
Ann Arbor's Finest Studio
619 E. Liberty Street
Temple Theatre
ADMISSION So.
(except Friday and Saturday)

Dress Suits and Opera Hats to rent.

i

U

I

q

r~tc~ utdon't
1 houMi' A Smoke /
Mlakcr"scfllze Ninh.st
G ro de _furkFirZh7
* t!.,q~ptian. Cir~grette.s
L; the TVorld.

I It I

Look at our Show Windows for
CANDY SPECIALTIES
Every day in the week.
THE SUGAR BOWL

REULE, CONLIN FIEGEL CO.

LComunicton

I

Apostle of National Preparedness is to
be in the city and give his view of the
question. In a statement published in
the Daily he says, "We have been fol-
lowing the demented policy of build-
ing warships for cold storage." But
suppose, we had followed the other
policy and had built ships to fight in-
stead of to display. Isn't it more than
likely that we would be engaged in the
general world war today? We have
had sufficient provocation. In fact,
we have had as much or more than
that which has sent some of the Euro-
pean powers into the present great
conflict. If preparedness for war pre-
vents war, then the nation that is best
prepared ought to have the least num-
ber of wars, and conversely the ones
that were not prepared would be those
constantly engaged in warfare. I pre-
sume our militarist friends would tell
us that Germany was unprepared for
war, that France wasn't ready to resist
an invasion, that England had been
"building warships for cold storage,"
and that a few years since neither
Russia nor Japan were prepared for
armed conflict. On the other hand, the
reason the South American nations so
seldom fight with each other is be-
cause each has a large and efficient
army and navy, the reason Norway
and Sweden are not continually over-
running one another is because each
has a military organization which is a
model for efficiency, and the reason
there has been 100 years of peace be-
tween this country and Canada is be-
cause both were ''armed to the teeth."
No, a military organization is only a
weapon that enables one nation to'
heap insult and injury on some other
nation. And, if such is its true func-
tion, if an efficient war machine is only
a means of enabling us to strut among
our neighboring nations and insult
them with impunity, then it were
much better that we continue our
present policy of "building warshipsr
for cold storage," or better still, use
the energy and capital expended in1
this useless and extravagant game of
preparing for a war that may never.
come and that everybody hopes will
neve com e,.for internal improvementst
and a preparation for peace...
0. B. THIEL, '16L.,

Friday, March 5
By the Governor's Order, (with
Estella Mards)
S4avurday, March 6
The Place, The Time and The Man
(with Gerda Holmes)
Next Week
The Lion's Bride.
Orpheum Theatre
The House of Famous Plays by Famous
Players.
THURS. FRI. MAR. 4-5
Marie Doro in "The Morals of
Marcus"
SAT. MAR. 6
Carlyle Blackwell in "The Key to
Yesterday"

I

--.----.

NOTED WAR CORRESPONDENT
HAS SEEN SERVICE ON FIELD

MAY STAGE HOCKEY CONTES
BETWEEN TWO PICKED T]

German-Austrian Side of Present
Subject of Talk to Benefit
Polish Relief Fund

War I Science

Team Alone Having Pei
Record of Those Who
Competed

Arcade Theatre
SHOWS: AFTERNOONS 4;00: EVE. 6:15; 7:45; 9:15
Friday, Mar. 5-Lola, 5 part Shubert
Drama, featuring Clara Kimball Young.
Saturday, Mar. 6-The Tragedy of Bear
Mountain, 2part Kalem Drama; Chiefly
Concerning Males, vitagraph Comedy;
Hearst-Selig News, also Lubin Comedy.
Coming - Mrs. Leslie Carter in "Du
Barry." watch for the date.
Spring Hats Now Ready
We carry a complete stock of the
most up-to-date hats to be found
anywhere. All late hats are trim-
med with the bow exactly on the
side. Hats with bow in the back
or at the quarter are out of date,
old timers. we make hats to order and
do all kinds of hat work. Your last
season's hat re-blocked in the latest
shape, with new trimmings, will look
new and up-to-date.
FACTORY H AT STORE
. 118 E. Htron St.

t
James F. J. Archibald, the noted war

f the ice permits, the intra

I correspondent, who is to give an illus- ! department will stage an

Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
It was with considerable interest
that I read the editorial in last Satur-
day's Daily on the introduction of mili-
tary training, and since it contends
that those who favor its introduction
are better equipped with argumentative
materials, I should like to offer a few
criticisms and perhaps suggest an-
swers to the issues presented in the
editorial.
It is said that the benefit to physique
and health to be obtained from mili-
tary training is one of the reasons why
it should be introduced. But even
though our gymnasium facilities are
grossly inadequate, is the introduction
of military drill going to increase
them? The physical benefit to be ob-
tained will come just as well if each
one will take his exercise in the form
of a daily tramp, at a time when he
will enjoy the walk and feels as though
he needs some physical exertion as it
will if all are compelled to march in
one mass, perhaps at a time of the
day when it would really be more
profitable for him to be engaged i
something else,
Then it is contended that the bene-
fits to be derived from discipline and
concerted action are a great asset.-
But is it not true, as Rabbi Heller said
a few weeks ago, that the function of
a university is to train men to act as1
individuals, to think for themselves?a
The university-trained man is to be a
leader, one who can act on his own
responsibility, and not one who loses
himself entirely in the mass of a mili-

Owing to the absence of Carl Smith,
'04E, graduate secretary of the uni-
versity Y. M. C. A. on a leave ofab-
sence, and because of the consequent
press of work on the paid officers of
the association, Philip C. Lovejoy, '16,
has been appointed an assistant em-
ployment secretary, and will take over
practically all of that work which has
heretofore been under the supervision
of Frank 1. Olmstead. The new em-
ployment office hours will be from
1:00 to 2:00 o'clock and from 5:00 to
6:00 o'clock daily, and all morning on
Saturdays.
Olmstead will asspme a part of the
religious work of the organization, re-
lieving Mr. Wellington H. Tinker who
will be largely engaged, during the
next few months, in conducting a cam-
paign for the raising of funds for .the
new association building.

11

P'R OT E C T YOUR EYES
The blinding reflection of sunlight on the white
snow causes a very severe strain on the eyes.
Amber Classes will filter the light and- prevent,
all eye strain keeping " your eyes in perfect condition
to study for your examinations.
We are showing a large line of both Amber and Dark
Smoked Glasses.
2S. up to $5.00
HALLER JEWELRY CO.
STATE STREET JEWELERS

ll

trated lecture for the benefit of the
Polish relief fund in Hill auditorium
March 9, on the German and Austrian
side of the present war, has probably
seen as much active service on the
battle-field as any man living.
Mr. Archibald has just returned
from Europe, where he has been re-
porting the German-Austrian phase
of the combat for an American maga-
zine. In addition to the present con-
flict, he has seen service in all of the
wars of recent years. He was with
the Boer. army in South Africa, in the
Philippines, in the Russian- Japanese
war, with the French in Morocco, the
Turks in Albania, and with Castro in
Venezuela. j
One of the most interesting features'
of the present war, as treated by Mr.
Archibald, is the curious way in which
the various nations have formed alli-
ances. "Strange Bedfellows," is the
expression used by the correspondent,
and in his discussion of the situation
at the present time, Mr. Archibald pre-
dicts that England and Russia will
come close to blows before the end
of the war. He also prophesies that
the close of the present war will see a
second conflict for the spoils taken
from the defeated side.

hockey contest between two pick
teams probably on Saturday or M
day. The selection of the cast for
aggregations has not yet been ms
but the members of the two teams w
be notified in time to work in a lit
practice.
With the defeat of the fresh eng
eers at the hands of the combin
se'nior and fresh lits, the intramu
hockey schedule closed Wednesd
night, the victor of the latest fr
walking away with the last set
numerals awarded to the hockey tea
in this season.
Every team in the intramural leag
has played at least three games, 1
science team alone having a perf
record. The fresh engineers we
forced to play off a' tie for sece
place with the combined lit and I
law teams, resulting in the lit occ
pancy of the second berth.
The final standings of the teams
the intramural league are as follow
Team W. L. Pc
Science. . ... . 3 0 1.0
'15 and '18 Lit.......... 2 1 .(
'18 Engineer..... ... .2 2 .5
Law . . ..... ......*..... 1 2 '.3
'15 and '16 Engineer... 1 2 .3
'17 Engineer..........1 2 .3
'17 Lit .... . .. 1 2 .3;

I
11

..4

Union Bridge Tourney Meets Tonight
Contestants in the Union Bridge
tourney will assemble at the Union at
7:30 o'clock tonight, for the next to
the last round of play. The highest
score is now 15,719 points for 25 sets
played. All players will be required
to play the full number of games be-
fore the tournament will close, al-
though the last regular round will oc-
cur next Friday, according to E. R.
McCall, '16L, who is chairman of the
tourney. .

PROFESSOR hALL TO SPEAK TO
EPISCOPAL STUDENTS TONIGHT
Prof. Arthur G. Hall, registrar
of the College of Literature, Science
and the Arts, will speak to Episcopal
men in the university at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in Harris hall. Professor
Hall's talk, which will be of an
informal nature, will deal with "The
Place of Religion in the Life of the
College Man," and he will treat of the
subject from his long experience as a
faculty man on the Michigan campus.
The meeting will be under the aus-
pices of the Michigan chapter of the
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, and all
men in the university are invited to'
come out to the meeting. This is the
first of a series of such meetings that
will be held intermittently throughout
the rest of the college year.

PATTENGILL SPEAKS AT UNION TATLOCK TO CONCLUDE S

Appoint Chaperones for Weekly Dance
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Hans, and Mr. and
Mrs. Homer Heath will chaperone the
Union membership dance, which will
be given at the clubhouse from 9:00
to 12:00 o'clock tomorrow night. The
committee in charge of the affair are
Clesson T. Bushnell, '15, Charles W.
Moore, '15E, Levi M. Hall, '15LT, and
Staatz Abrams, '17.
Tickets Sellimg for Saxophone Dance
Tickets for what is probably the
last Wright Saxophone dance, to be
held at the Union at 9:00 o'clock to-
night, are now selling rapidly. Those
wishing tickets are requested to tel-

i
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1

You Ought to Come in
i you are at all interested in the very latest
sheet music. Every Friday our Detroit store
us the big hits o the week. They are
yours at ten cents a copy.

Lansing Man to Talk on "The Citi-
zen's Try-Square," Sunday
Henry R. Pattengill, of Lansing, ed-
itor and publisher of "Moderator-Top-
ics," the official organ of the depart-
ment of public instruction and of the
state teachers' association, will be the
speaker at the gathering at the Union
on Sunday. Mr. Pattengill has chosen
for his subject "The Citizen's Try-
Square." He was Progressive candi-
date for governor at the last election.
Mr. Pattengill is president of the
Christian sociology class of the First
Baptist church, a class which is de-
scribed as "free to folks that use their
thinking machinery, enjoy beautiful
pictures, appreciate good lectures, or
who like to know what's doing in the
world nowadays."
The musical program for the after-
noon will be announced tomorrow or
Sunday.

Rentaiiing Thursday Lenten Serv
Given by Prof. Lloyd
Prof. J. S. P. Tatlock, of the Eng
department, will give the last of a
ries of talks on the general sub
of "Liturgies" at 4:30' o'clock this
ternoon, in St. Andrew's church.
particular subject which will be
cussed by Professor Tatlock will
"The Liturgy of the Protestant E
copal Church," but his treatment
be of a general character, and
students interested in the general E
ject are invited to attend.
On the remaining three Thurs
afternoons in the Lenten season, P
A. H. Lloyd will give a series of
tures on, "A Modern Superstitio
"'What the Ideal is Made of,"
"Some Ethical Values of Myste
These lectures will be along the de
opment of a single theme and shc

organ

zation. .
o me that the most fal-
it of the militarists is

PHONE 1707
FOR DELIVERY

GRINNELL BROS.
"The Source of the Latest and Best"

120-122
E. LIBERTY ST.

- ...; e

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