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February 27, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-02-27

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THE DAILY
f EVERY MORNING

The

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE
NOW

I

Vol. XXV. No. 104.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

ARSITY READY F R
NOTRE DAME SQUAD

TODAY
Michigan-Notre Dame track meet in
Waterman gymnasium, 7:30 o'clock.

BAND BOUNCE WIN
CAMPUS'_APPROVAL
Crowd of 5,000 Fills Hill Auditorium
for Program of Song, Dance
and Story

WARRIOR OF PEACE
STATESHIS VIEWS
Dr. Geo. 3Y. Nasmyth Urges Discussion
of Terms of Settlement of
Treaties

Catholic and Wolverine Track TPaits
Battle Tonight in Dual Meet
for First Time in
-l-,Fears
COACH FARRELL SATISFIED
WITH CHANCES FOR VTICTOIY
Large Crowd Applies for Ticket sat
Offices of Athletic
Association
* TONI(HT'' DUAL MEFT. *

Membership dance . at Union, 9:00 E
o'clock. FT LLIO Is AND E)LIREDGE S(1,RIE

AT CO)MBINED) 1EETlN(G

TO TALK

'I.
a:
p

-0--
Time--7:30 o'cicck.
Place-Waterman Gymnasium.
Competing teams-Michigan and
Notre Dame.%
Attendance-500.
Rival Coaches-Stephen J. Far-
rell of Michigan, and J. C.
Harper of Notre Dame.
* * * * * * * * * * ,

*
*

*
*
:
*
*

For the first time in 15 years, track
teams of Michigan and Notre Dame
will clash in a dual meet, when the
Catholic and the Wolverine squads
battle tonight for honors in the initial
indoor collegiate meet of the Michigan
1915 season.
In charge of Coach J. C. Harper,
former Maroon athlete, the Notre
Dame squad will arrive in Ann Arbor
this afternoon at 2:32 o'clock, over the
Michigan Central lines. The Catholics
are expected to come more than 20
strong for this meet, which is the big-
gest of their indoor season. The west-
erners will be quartered at the Catal-
pa Inn during their stay in this city,
and will probably leave for South
Bend some time on Sunday.
Michigan's track men rested yester-
day afternoon, only one or two of the
Varsity men showing up in the gymna-
sium. Coach Farrell, though refusing
to make any prediction on the score of
tonight's meet, expressed himself as
.atisfied -with the chances of his men
for a victory. The rooters, however,
are far more optimistic than the coach,
and, unless the Wolverines come out
on top by at least a 2 to 1 score, they
will be sorely disappointed. Predic-
tions point to Michigan's taking first
place in at least five events, with the
certainty that they will take the ma-
jority of seconds and thirds.
Four changes in the list of, officials
were announced yesterday afternoon.
William. D. Knight of Detroit, former
Michigan football player, will take the
place of W. T. Fishleigh as track
judge, Charles Barton of Detroit, one-
time Wolverine baseball man, will act
as field judge, in place of Homer
{Ieath, while Coach J. C. Harper of
Notre Dame, and James B. Craig will
act as timers, in the places of Evans
Holbrook and C. B. Haff.
A revival of last year's football
seat sales was seen yesterday after;
noon when students nearly stampeded
the athletic association office in the
effort to get those tickets left over
from the special distribution to the
seniors. Over 400 lined up, and it was
necessary to turn many away after the
350 left had been given out.
MICHIPGN CHESS PLAYERS WIN
ADVANTAGE IN HARVARD MATCH
Loeal Team Forces Opponents to Give
Up Piece in Exchange
for Pawn .
Michigan chess players have secured
the first advantage in the Harvard-
Michigan correspondence chess tour-
namment, as the result of the winning
of a piece in one of the games in ex-
change for one pawn. The advantage
is apparently sufficient to insure vic-
tory for the Michigan team, with cor-
rect playing on both sides, as in the
other four games, neither side can
claim any superiority.
W. T. Adams, '17, is the captain of
the Michigan team in charge of the
game that has secured the advantage,
and is opposed by W. Fabens, '16L, of
the Harvard team.
Play in the first half of the tourna-
ment for the chess championship of
"the local club has been completed, the
standings of the contenders in class

Chess and Checker club meet at Un-
ion, 7:30 o'clock.,
Soph lit dance in Barbour gymnasium,
2:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Cosmopolitan club meets in Harris
hall, 4:00 o'clock.
J. E. Walker speaks on "Essentials of
Success for a College Man after
Leaving College"' at Union, 3:00
o'clock.
J. Knox Montgomery speaks on "Hang
Out Your Sign" at the Majestic, 6:10
o'clock.
Hugh Black speaks at Presbyterian
church, 7:45 o'clock.
President Harry A. Garfield will speak
on "Righteous Judgment at the
Methodist church, 7 :30 o'clock.
Mr. Barrett speaks on "IscChurch
Membership Essential?", at Presby-
terian church, 10:30 o'clock.
Henry Stephens Gives Book to Library
Henry Stephens, one of the candi-
dates for regent on the Republican
ticket, in the recent campaign, pre-
sented the general library with a copy
of his privately printed "South Amer-
ican Travels." The work is dedicated
to the Hon. Chase S. Osborn.
BATTIN PRACTICE

Massachusetts, into the campus lime-
light, with a punch that knocked the
legs out from under the long-faced
contingent, and sent 5,000 students
and townspeople on their way chuck-
ling over the two hour program of
song, dance and story that they had
viewed in Hill auditorium under the
head o f Michigan's second "Band
Bounce." The bellows of "more" had
almost equaledbin volume the spine.
tickling strains of the "Victors," so
the promoters of the entertainment
chuckled as well.
Waldo Fellows, '14, and "Gord" El-
dredge, '14, also came back, and sent
a program of wit and vocal wanderings
out over the footlights that won for
them the position of king pins for the
evening. The breezy farce, "Cheese
It!," by W. A. P. John, '16, seemed to
appeal to the audienc6's sense of hu-
mor, and was well-applauded as the
mythical curtain dropped.
George M. Olson, '17, stepped out of
the veil of obscurity that has shrouded
him since leading the 1913 Varsity
band down Ferry field, and showed his
old adeptness with the baton. Ap-
pealing more to the aesthetic senses,
Gerald Strong, '15D, rendered "Sweet-
hearts," on the violin, in a pleasing
manner, while a delegation of some 60
women put the Girls' Glee club on the
map.
UNIVERSITY FENCING QUARTET.
LE AVES FOR TILT AT ITHACA

Yes, the band came back last night
--bounced all the way from'Cambridge,,

In order to inaugurate a nation-wide
discussion of the terms of settlement

which will,
peace, Dr.

make for a more permanent
George W. Nasmyth, who

"Jack" Enzenroth, Captain of
Squad, Gives Advice in Role<
Catchier's Critic

1910
of

Foilmen Not
of Rig
g

Overconfident on
Intercollegiate
Contest

BACKS'TOPS APPEAR PROMISING r
Coach Lundgren sent his men
through the second day of batting
practice at Waterman gym yesterday
afternoon, preparing the way for im-
provement in the use of the stick, by
giving the squad a short talk on form
in batting, and how it exercises prac-
tical effects.
Personal work 'dominated the after-
noon's session, Lundgren making the
rounds of the players and giving each
one advice particularly adapted to his
needs. .;Jack" Enzenroth, captain of
the Varsity baseball nine in 1910, as-
sumed the role of catcher's critic, and
made the rounds of the candidates for
that position, as they took their turns
in the batting cages. . The Kansas City
catcher seems to be quite satisfied
withl the material that has appeared
for the backstop position, and he be-
lieves that, with a few touches of pol-
ishing, the material should develop
into a couple of good men for the now
vacant post.
MEMORIAL FOUNTAIN PLAN
HALTED BY BUILDING RUMORS
Whether the senior, laws should
leave a. memorial drinking fountain
was not decided at the meeting of the
class yesterday, as the committee re-
ported thatDean H. M. Bates had
given out information that the law
building might be remodelled within
the next two or three years. This
would make the fountain merely a
temporary affair..
After a discussion in regard to the
annual Crease dance, it was decided to
follow custom, and restrict the affair
to the senior laws, only,
FRESH ENGINEERS TO MEET
LAW HOCKEY TEAM TONIGHT
Fresh engineers will meet the law
hockey team at Weinberg's skating
pavilion at 6:15 o'clock tonight, to de-
termine which team shall play the-
combined senior and fresh lits for the
possession of the second set of num-
erals, to be awarded for second place
in the intramural hockey league.
Photos of 60 Senior Engineers Needed
Out' of 200 individual pictures of
senior engineers which are to be taken

Captain Mattsson, Nichols and White
made up the Varsity fencing team that
left last night for Ithaca, and, while
the Wolverine foilmen are far from
over-confident, they will face the Cor-
nell swordsmen, determined to put up
the battle of their lives.
The Cornell team is made up of vet-
eran fencers, who last year forced the
winners of the eastern intercollegiate
to the utmost, to beat them out of first;
place. Michigan's trio of fencers, on
the other hand, has had little outside
competition, although the men have
been improving steadily during the
past few days of practice.
Captain Mattsson is the strongest of
the Wolverine trio', and the Varsity
leader is expected to win his bouts in
the Cornell meet. The fact that Matts-
son won all three of his bouts in the,
faculty tournament this week, stows
that the Michigan captain is in top
form for tonight's match with the kha-
cans.
COMEDY CLUB MAY GO ON ROAD
"Pomander Walk" to Be Given in De-
troit and Chicago 1
"Pomander Walk" will be presented
in Detroit or Chicago, or both, if the
Comedy club can override the numer-
ous obstacles that loom ahead, in the
way of alumni support, faculty per-
mission and eligibility. Just now the
prospects for making these trips are
fairly bright, and it is thought by
President Louis K. Friedman, '15, thA,
within about 10 days, the club will be
in a position to give a final decision
as to the outcome of the negotiations
that are now being carried on.
Not wishing to compete with the
numerous student entertainmentsthat
will be given on the campus this Z
spring, the club has declared against
a third appearance in Ann Arbor. It is
thought that such a play would "asurp
too much of the company's tine

will address the combined meeting of
the International Polity club and the
Cosmopolitan club, in Harris hall,'at
7:30 o'clock Monday, is visiting many
of the western universities, including
Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Nebras-
ka, Kansas and Ohio State. Dr. Nas-
myth has visited in recent years, the
universities of 22 countries, in. con-
nection with the international student
movement, and has an intimate knowl-
edge of all the warring nations.'
"America is really A cross-section
of Europe," said Dr Nasmyth, yester-
day." With our' millions of citizens of
German descent, of British descent,
and our close ties with all of the Eu-
ropean nations engaged in the war,
we have an opportunity to get the
viewpoint of all nations, and thus to
find terms of settlement which will re-
move many of the possible causes of
wars. Through such discussion, we
could find out the legitimate needs and
aspirations of the nations, such as the
claim of Russia for an ice-free port,
the denial of which has already been
an important cause in three wars,-
the Crimean, the Russo-Japanese and
the present world war.
"The conclusion reached in such a
nation-wide discussion would have
an important influence upon the
treaty of peace, in three ways.
In the first place, i would have direct
effect u on the public opinion in Euro-
pearsn countries, through the millions
of letters constantly being exchanged
through newspaper clippings, and our
magazine articles; secondly, through
a constructive offer of mediation,
which President Wilson will be able
to make at the proper time; and third-
ly, through the direct influence which
America will be able to exert in the
peace conference itself."
DRAW IN FIRST WRESTLING TILT
Five Matches Today in Waterman
Gymnasium
W. Pittsley, '18E, and M. A. Baer, '18,
wrestled each other to a standstill in
their match of the opening round of
the university wrestling tournament,
which is being staged in Waterman
gym. Both men displayed some good
work, but neither was able to pin the
other to the mat for the necessary
three points.
Three other matches were decided
on the opening day of the tournament.
W. J Huss, '18, forfeited to A. E.
Loucks, '18, M. E. Brown, '17, yon
from C. L. Haas, '17, in four and one-
half minutes. C. K. Andrus, '17, threw
A. . Loucks, '18, in 23 1-2 minutes,
and M. A. Baer, '18, drew with W.
Pittsley, '18E, in 30 minutes.
Five matches are scheduled for 3:00
o'clock today, in the wrestling room
at Waterman gym. Baer and Pittsley
will try to wrestle off their drawn
match, R. R. Weske, '18, will meet S.
Cohn, '17E, C. K. Andrus, '17, will op-a
pose L. C. Reimann, '17-, R. P. Baker,'
'17E, will grapple with A. Walls, '18.
Captain Watson will referee all of to-
day's matches.
The university tournament is an an-
nual affair, the winners in each class
being awarded numeral.caps by the
athletic association.
Prof. A. Tealdi Gives Talk in Lansing
Prof. Aubrey Tealdi, of the depart-
ment of landscape design, gave an i-
lustrated lecture on "Park Improve-
ments," in Lansing last night.

C. E. SHOE FFEL, '15L, SERIOUSLY
INJURED IN BASKETBALL GAME
Carl R Shoeffel, '15L, who was in-
jured Thursday night in the basketball
game between the seio~ and the fresh
laws, is reported by hospital authori-
ties to. be in a serious condition, suf-
fering from internal injuries. At a
consultation held yesterday among
health service physicians, it was not
definitely decided upon whether or not
an operation would be necessary. The
accident took place when Shoeffel col-
lided violently with his opponent.
UNION OPERA CAST DISCUSSES
BOOK OF "ALL THAT GLITTERS"
At a meeting of the entire cast of
"All That Glitters," the Union opera,
at the Union yesterday afternoon, the
book was read over, and the changes
suggested by Sylvan Grosner, '14L, the
author, were made.
Director Sanger will arrive In Ann
Arbor Monday or Tuesday, and will
stay until the opera is produced. On
Tuesday night he will hold a rehears-
al of the cast and chorus.
Another rehearsal of the chorus will
be held at 1:'30 o'clock today in McMil-
lan hall. No cuts were made last night.
Commerce Club Elects to Membership
At a recent meeting of the Commerce
club 10 nw members were voted
in. The successful candidates were
Tony Amtsbuechler, '16, henry los-
mer, '16, Karl Renz, '16, Robert Has-
kins, '16, R. R. Lounsbury, '16, George
Fox, '16, David Ballentine, '16, Fred
14. Begole, '16, R. C. Barnum, '15, and
R. E. Williamson, '16.
SENIOR LITS LOSE'
.IN CLOSECONTEST'
Last Year's Champions Sustain Defeat
at Hands of Sophs in
Basketball
JUNIOR ENGINEERS BEAT FRESH
Last year's canipus basketball cham-
pions sustained their second success-
ive defeat of lhe season, last night at
Waterman gym, falling victims to the
lightning play of the soph lits. The
final numerical version of the affair1
was: Soph lits 27, senior lits 25.
The fresh engineers fell before the'
junior engineers, 21 to 9, while the
senior engineers administered a spund
drubbing to the soph engineers, the
final score standing 24 to 10.
Bradbeer, occupying the pivot po-
sition for the soph lits, figured promi-
nently in an offensive way, flicking
seven baskets from the 'field. 'Qohen,
who was stationed at left guard for the
sophs, ably assisted b spoil-
ing many a well-intended shot.
"H owdy" Marsh once again cov-
ered himself with glory for th senior
aggregation, registering 7 points out
of 11 endeavors from the fal line.
Brown was also a potent factor on de-
fense, while the majority of the scor-
ing honors for the last year team went
(Continued on Page 4)
MEMORIAL COMMITTEE TELLS
OF PROPOSED THEATER PLANS
Details of the' proposed memorial
pl1n of the senior literary class, were
explained yesterday by members oft
the mnemoria committee. The idea is
to leave $600, at the disposal of the
class, in trust, with the regents of the
university, until the amount necessaryu
to build a campus theater will havej
been secured. In the meantime, the

fund is to- be loaned in scholarships,
to students of th@ literary college.
The proposed play-house is to be a
theater 'of the average type, and 'will
not necessarily be located on the cam-
pus. The project will be voted on at
the next meeting of 'the class, which
will be held next week.;
I)RAWINGS WILL BE MADE FOR
FIRST RELAY TEAMS, TUSDAY
Drawings will be made next Tuies-
day afternoon, to determine what,
teams are to run in the first inter-class
relay races of the year, scheduled for
the following day on the Waterman
gym track. Intramural Director Floyd
A. Rowe will be at the gym every day
next week f rom 3:00 until 5 :00 o'clock
in the afternoon, and from 7:00 until
4:00 o'clock in the evening, to coachf
men who desire to come out for their
class relay teams.

INAUGURATE FRESH
LIT A SSEMBLAGES
President Hutchins and Dean Effinger
Will Speak at First Meeting to
Be Held Tuesday.
Afternoon
N. W. WASSMAN, '18, APPOINTED
CHAIRMAN OF NEW COMMITTEE
Owing to Class Interest, Attendance
at Monthly Assemblies Will Not
Be Required
For the first time in the history of
the literary college, members of theT
freshman class will hold an assembly,
at 4:15 o'clock Tusday, in University
Hall. Acting Dean John R. Effinger
will give a short preliminary talk,.af-
ter which President Harry B. Hutch-
ins will deliver a short address.
According to the plan adopted, these
assemblies will take place monthly,
and at each meeting the speakers for
the following assembly will be an-
nounced. After the address, the meet-
ing" will be turned over to the class
for a business session.
It is not proposed to make the at-
tendance of these assemblies compul-
sory, as there seems to basufficient
interest in the plan to make such a,_
regulation unnecessary. Dean Effin-
ger wishes however, to impress on the
freshmen the importance of a full at-
tendance.
N. W. Wassman, '18, was appointed
chairman of the class committee,
which was formed to assist in organiz-
ing the new plan. The members of the
faculty committee authorized to con-
sider the assembly plan were: Prof.
A. L. Cross, Prof. C. O. Davis, Prof.
C. B. Vibbert and Dean J. R. Effinger.
FACULTY MEMBERS COA1E BACK
FROM TEACHERS' CONVENTION
Prof. A. S. Whitney, Assistant Pro-
fessors C. D. 'Berry, F. S. Breed and
G. L. Jackson, all of the department
of education, returned yesterday from
Cincinnati,. where they had been at-
tendiyg the convention of the Nation-
al Association of -College Teachers in -
Education.
Among the educational -authorities
that attended this convention were El-
la Flagg Young, superintendent of
schools at Chicago, W. L. Bryan, pres-
ident of Indiana University and P. P.
Claxton, U. S. commissioner of educa-
tion. Ex-President William H. Taft
and Lindley Garrison, secretary of
war, also attended the convention, the
latter speaking on, "Military Training
for College Students."
Prof. C. S. Davis, of the department
of.educaticn will not return until Mon-
day, as he is to speak before the In-
diana State Teachers' association to-
ilght
MEMBERS OF DEBATING TEAMSĀ°
THOSEN FOR )$1ARCR UONTESTS
Final try-outs for positions on the
two mid-west debating teams have re-
sulted in the selection of Jacob Lavin,
'17L, V. H. Sugar, '16, and H. M. Kar,
grad, with E,. J. Engle, '15, as alter-
nate, who will take the affirnative.
The negative side will be debated by
B. F. Gates, '15, George Claassen, '17L,
and S. Roenstein, '15L. W. 'IL Good-
win, '16L, will fill the alternative posi-
tion.'
The debate will be held in Univer-
sity Hall on March 26, where the af-
firmative. 'team will meet the Illinois

debators. The negative team will
travel to Madison, where it will meet
the Wisconsin delegation the same
night.
Bulletin Has Article by Prof. J. Glover
Prof. James W. Glover, of the de-
partment of mathematics, is joint au-
thor of a bulletin issued by the United
States department of Agriculture, con-
sisting of a compilation of data and
an analysis of economic features af-
fecting the construction and maintain-
ance of highways financed by bond is-
sues, and also the theory of highway
calculations. Laurence I. Howes, of
the office of Public Roads, assisted in
the compilation.
To Represent Michigan at Conference
Fred B. Foulk, '13-'16L, will repre-
sent Michigan at the National. Peace
Conference, to be held in Chicago to-
day and tomorrow. W. W. Welsh, '12,
who recently accepted a position with
the Chicago Peace society, will also be
present.

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
Dr. Harry, A. CA rf Ield,0
PRESIDENT OF WILLIAMS COLLEGE
SUBJECT:
.ighteous Judgment
Sunday, February 28, 7:30,P. M.,
METHODIST CHURCH

.........9 for the large picture for the engineer-
..................6 ing building, about 60 remain untaken,.
... . 3 and the local photographer who has
E .............. .2 the contract states that sittings should
. 0 be arranged for at once,

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