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February 24, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

{-

I

lichigan

Daily S

I5

t

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1915.

PRICE-FIVE

_____ _

_.

--^---

V

ITS

TODAY
Forestry club meets in room 407, en-
gineering building, 7:30 o'clock..

ers

BOAT CLUB BEGINSOG N 1 ;'0 9
ON CANVASS TODAY
Committeemen Commence Systematic
Invasion of Campus This
Afternoon at 4:00
O'clock
SELL STUDENTS, FACULTY AND
ALUMNI MEMBERSHIPS FOR $1.50
Postpone Smoker Booked for Tonight
. Until Next Tuesday
at Union

HOOSIERS PREPARE
FOR COMING MEET
Notre Dame Squad Receives Final
Polishlng in Expectation
of Saturday's
Tilt
ENTER CRACK SPRINTERS WHO
HAD EVEN BREAK WITH I. A. C.

Barrister's luncheon at
o'clock.

Union, 12:001

Dixie club smoker at Union,
o'clock.

7:00

Dad

Senior lit dinner at
o'clock.
Tau Beta Pi dinner at,
o'clock.

Union, 6:00
Union, 6:00

Waage Has Record of 4:30 in
for This Year; Half Miler
Runs in 2:03

Mile

TOMORROW

e uner-
in Wat-
'th year
e third
groups
4, while
ned the

Forum discusses "Summer Baseball"
at Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Fresh engineer dance at Union, 9:00
o'clock.
Web and Flange Dinner at Union, 6:00
o'clock.

to 11 Meeting of alumni of State Normal
College, at McMillan hall, 8:00
, dis- o'clock.
p ev.

equent
>rs en-
seven
e work
s game
serious

CONTENTS Of
TE TO COUNCIL

the
fol-

Student Legislators Refuse to Reveat
Letter Concerning Police
Duties
APPOINT SEVERAL COMMITTEES

(7)

While the contents of the note from
Edison the student council to the senate coui-
Depree cil in regard to its "police duty" prob-
ably will not be made public until the
.. Cook first meeting of the latter body, to be
de, Edison
Van Edison held during the first week of next
-VnOch-
, 15 min- month, it is understood that the expla-
Umpire, nation the student council has offered
will be satisfactory, and that any mis-
the third understanding between the two bodies
a score of
Y the big ",ll o, to an end.
ith seven Although the abolition of its "police
e the jun- duty," meaning the discontinuanceby
egister a councilnen to act as restrainers of
ne at the rioters, relieves the council of what is
the third felt to be a disagreeable task, it is
get their said that this will not substantially
niors had change the police powers of the body.
The line- The note is now in the hands of
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
916 D (4) School, who together with Prof. Alfred
,ne,Fisher . Lloyd, chairman of the senate com-
vn, Wells mittee on student affairs, has charge
... Steel -of the matter. When interviewed last
er, Leicht night, Dean Bates thought that the
Boquim senate council would not recommend
7, Bond, any changes in the student council.
oals from An opinion of the student council
Is. Time was taken on the advisability of the
eree-Ap- General Election Day plan, which is
being advocated by the Michigan Un-
our point ion, and the body announced itself in
eir game favor of the idea. It is not actively
'st period supporting it, however, and did not
r five on think the plan could be extended to

Campaigners in the Michigan Union
Boat club canvass have been lining up
committeemen during the last two
days and will open a systematic in-
vasion of the campus at 4:00 o'clock
this afternoon. The smoker booked
for tonight, had to be postponed' be-
cause of a misunderstanding with the
Union management as to the date, and
will be held at the Union next Tues-
day night.
Following a meeting of chairmen of
the various schools and colleges last
Sunday. afternoon, large numbers of
committeemen have been secured, and
preparations made for the active work.
Soliciting of alumni and faculty men
may be deferred until next week after
the aheaviest of the student work has
been completed. The officers and chair-
men of committees met at the Union
last night to discuss the work and
will hold another meeting tonight, at
which nen will be chosen to assist
Harold Smith, '16, general chairman
of the regatta.
Campaigning is to be carried on by
schools and colleges, with Sidney T.
Steen, '16E, Boyd Compton, '16, Paul
Thompson, '16L, and William Lamor-
eaux, '16L, in charge- of the canvass
in their respective colleges and
schools, and with J. C. Abbott, '15E,
heading work in the combined schools.
Memberships will sell to any male stu-
dent alumnus or faculty member at
$1.50, (though Union members may
join for one dollar) and will entitle
members to all the club's activities,
including participation in the regatta
on the Huron river in May.'
ANNUAL PENN RELAY CARNIVAL
WILL CONTINUE FOR TWO DAYS
Upsula University, of Stockholm, and
Cambridge and Oxford
May Enter
Announcement comes from Phila-
delphia through the University of
Pennsylvania that the annual relay
carnival will not be limited to one day
as has formerly been the case, but
that the meet will be held on two days,
April 23 and 25, and will include a
Pentathlon on Friday, the regular
events of the Olympic Pentathlon be-
ing contested for.
Two new relay championships have
been added to the program, each one
a medley race. In one race the first
man will run a quarter mile, the sec-
ond a half mile, the next three-quar-
ters of a mile, and the last man a mile.
The other race is composed of two
220 yard dashes which are run by thl-
first two men, a 440' yard dash run by
the third man, and an 880 yard run for
the final runner.
The first day of the meet will wit-
ness the introduction of three special
features, the 56-pound weight for dis-
tance, the 440 yard hurdle and the hop,
step and jump. The program for the
second and last day of the meet is
like that of previous years, among the
events being the one, two and four
mile college relay championships of
America. It is rumored that the Eng-
lish universities of Cambridge and Ox-
ford may be represented, and also that
Upsula University of Stockholm, Swe-
According to a classification of the
various universities and colleges, Ox-
ford, Cambridge, Yale, Harvard,
Princeton, Cornell, Dartmouth, Mich-1
igan, Chicago, Illinois, and Pennsyl-.
vania are ranked as members of Class
I..

SOUTH BEND, IND., Feb. 24.-With
the track meet against the University
of Michigan scheduled for next Satur-
day, the Notre Dame squad is receiv-
ing a final polishing in preparation
for the Wolverines.
Notre Dame looks particularly for-
midable in several events, but wheth-
er these will be sufficient to swing the
meet will be a question. The three
crack sprinters who made a clean
sweep in the dashes against the I. A.
C. probably will be taken, to Ann Ar-
bor. The two Bergman brothers are
looked upon to place, and many local
followers think that with an even
break, one of them may defeat the
Michigan speed man, Smith, for first
place.
McDonough and .Waage, the half
miler and miler, respectively, are an-
other pair of runners that the Catho-
lic institution is expecting to pull
down first places. Waage already has
run pretty close to 4:30 this year,
which is several seconds faster than
the fleetest Michigan man has run, ac-
cording to reports. McDonough ran
2:03 against the I. A. C. a couple of
weeks ago, and the Notre Dame root-
ers are expecting to see him crowding
the two-minute mark pretty closely if
he is pushed next Saturday.
Whalen, the quarter miler, ran 53
3-5 in the same meet, and whoever the
Michigan entry in this event chances
to be, he is promised a full evening's
work. The locals have been unable to
draw much line on the work of the
Michigan team, and unless the inex-
perienced squad from the Wolverine
school comes through in pretty good
shape, they may meet with a surprise
on Saturday.
SENIOR LITS HOL
Dinner Tonight to Be First of Series
of Functions Planned By
Committee
WILL GIVE DANCE ON MARCH 6
According to the senior lit social
committee, the dinner at 6:00 o'clock
this evening at the Union will open a
series of functions now being planned.
With Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the
engineering college, and Prof. Robert
M. Wenley, of the department of phil-
osophy, as well as the class speakers
and a musical program, in the list of
entertainments, the committee hopes
to have a large proportion of the class
present tonight. All who desire to at-
tend, and have not secured tickets, are
asked to get them at the Union desk
before 2:00 o'clock today, as a certain
attendance must be guaranteed the
Union.
An afternoon dance will be given
on March 6 at the Union, for which
some special program will be arrang-
ed, as for the last cabaret dance. How-
ard R. Marsh has charge of this event.
In addition to the members of the
social committee, a committee com-
posed of Marjorie Delavan, Fanny Ho-
gan and Marion McPherson is plan-
ning an afternoon dance to be given
after spring vacation.

Girls, We'll Be'
Glad To Come
Somebody's to blamle?
That much is sure, but it is hard to
say whether it was a practical joke of
one of the members, or a printer's er-
ror.
Invites to a Sorosis initiation have
been received by a number of fraterni-
ty houses on the campus!'
As a result, all yesterday afternoon,
members of the different organizations
were holding confabs with one an-
other over the matter. To invade the
secret premises of a sorority house in
a body to witness an initiation,-that
was something novel to be sure, and
perhaps might prove interesting. Rec-
ords of the past were consulted, but no
reference to such an open initiation
could be found. Finally they all gave'
it up.
Last night, the wires from the Sor-
osis house were kept humming. Bash-
ful, demure maidens were calling up,
waiving all attempt at formality or ex-
planation, only pleading them "not to
come."
S ' a
FACULTY FENCER'S
VIE "WITH' VARSITY
Foil Artists Meet in Three Match
Tournamnent in Waterman Gym
This Afternoon '

Carroll, Ufer, Fox and Lynch'
Nine Laps for Mark
of 2:43 3-5

TO PREPARE TEAM FOR CORNELL
Michigan'%, Varsity fencing team
will meet the faculty foil artists in a
three match tournament at 4:00 o'clock
this afternoon in Waterman gym, the
competition with the faculty men hav-
ing been arranged to give the Varsity
team practice for the coming match
with Cornell.
J. It. Hayden, S. P. Lockwood and
A. E. Boak make up the team that will
oppose the undergraduate fencers in
this afternoon's tourney, and the fac-
ulty men expect to give a ,0d account
of themselves, although tire Varsity
foil men have the advantag-. of more
regular practice during the last week.
Captain Mattson, Nichols, :nd either
White or Monroe will oppos the fac-
ulty team, and it is from tl, quartet
that the trio of Varsity fenc will be
chosen to meet Cornell in the first in-
tercollegiate match of the season ont
Saturday night.
The men have been doing good work
during the past week, grea improve-
ment having been shown by the new
men. While the Wolverine onen real-
ize that Cornell will prove a tough
nut to crack, they are confident that
the Michigan team will give a good
account of itself.
GIVES 'EADING OF AL1PE4I4ORY
Margaret Stahl Offers "Everywoman"
in Hill Auditorium
Proper interpretation, combined
with a delivery capable of the-requir-
ed shades of vocal expression, contrib-
uted largely to the success of Marga-
ret Stahl's reading of "Every, oman,"
given in Hill auditorium last t ening.
Especially in the presenta. ion of
"Nobody," the most dramatic fLure of
the allegory, Miss Stahl was excep-
tionally forceful, her contralto tones
adapting themselves well to th:, needs
of the character. "Everywoman," in
her pilgrimage in quest of los e, was
also admirably portrayed, as were the
personified qualities of "Bluff," "Flat-
tery," "Truth," "Modesty" and
"Wealth."
The story of "Everywoman's" wan-
derings, her loss of her companions,
"Youth," "Beauty" and "Modesty," the
latter of whom finally returns to her
with the discovery of the true "King
Love the First" in her old hom, all-
this makes a long recital, and U. e at-
tention and appreciation of the audi
ence was a tribute to Miss Stahl' abil-
ity.

With two defeats as an incentive for
a hard fight for victory in the next at-
tempt, Trainer Steve Farrell yesterday
started his preparation of the 1,000-
yard quartet which will clash with the
Notre Dame team as the closing event
on the dual meet program in Water-
man gymnasium Saturday night.
In his training of relay squads thus
far in 1915, Farrell has been forced to
change his tactics each time with the
change in the distance of the race.
The Buffalo event necessitated the de-
velopment of a "medley" team, the
Princeton clash called for a quartet
of half milers, and the Notre Dame
event will need four 450-yard runners.
Trials for the team probably will be
held on Thursday, the present plans
of the trainer calling for the selection
of a squad on that day.
Captain "Hal" Smith and O'Brien
are practically certain of places, but
the selection of the two remaining rac-
ers will depend upon the performances
of the men in the trials. Ziegler and
Lapsley from the sprint squad are
among the likely candidates, and are
expected to show well in the try-outs.
There is a strong possibility that Far-
rell will have to draw on his quarter
milers to fill up the quartet, in which
case Fontana, Burby, John, Robinson
and Huntington will all have a chance
to show their merit. Of these, Robin-
son is one of the most likely candi-
dates, his showing in both the sprints
and the 880-yard run on Saturday
night marking him as one of the most
versatile racers on the Wolverine
'squad.
Carroll and Ufer, running with Fox
and Lynch, the latter an ineligible dis-
tance man, yesterday afternoon hung
up the best time made this year for
the nine-lap distance, when they paced
around the track under Far-
rell's watch for a 2:43 3-5
mark. Fox set the pace for
the first three laps, then Ufer took the
lead, and Carroll finished out in front.
Fox kept up with the leaders until th
final round, when he dropped slightly
behind.
Development of the men who showed
best in the events in Saturday's meet
will be, the principal task before Far-
rell from now until Saturday night,
when Notre Dame comes to Waterman
gymnasium. Seven events, the same
as staged last week, with the addition
of the relay race, will make up the
dual meet program, with first, second
and third place counting in the total-
ling of points.
1915 LITS DISCUSS MEMORIAL
A T CLASS MEETING TOMQRROW
Because of dissatisfactions with the
memorial recommended by the com-
mittee, the senior lits will reconsider
the question at the class meeting,
which will be held at 4:00 o'clock to-
morrow in Tappan hall.
The memorial recommended provid-
es for a scholarship fund of $500 or
$600, to be in the custody of Dean J.
R. Effinger, of the literary college. It
is to be advanced in lots of $75 to
applicants, except freshmen, and is re-
payable after one year.
An historian and prophet will be
elected from the women of the class.
A poet and class day orator will also
be elected at this meeting. A discus-
sion of a General Cane Day for all
senior classes will be held, and a cal-
lection of class dues made.
-. a.W a >xWt-

1?

TRAININGFOR TILl
Incentive of Two Defeats Promhpts
Farrell to Prepare Men
for 1,000-Yard
Quartet
CAPTAIN SMITH AND O1BRIEN
ONLY RACERS SURE OF PLACES

fa

r

>unt. The
n the final
educe this

of the

191 L (15)
.Melaniphy
Brownell
..........Morse
........ Wright
...Scott, Stevens
d-McClelland 4,
2, Morse 2, Mel-
cGraw; goals from
Morse 3, McClel-
eferee-Applegate.
me of halves-15

include election of councilmen.
T. E. Agee, '15L, was appointed gen-
eral chairman for the spring games,
and the following committees were an-
nounced: Pushball-W. I. Lillie, '15M,
chairman, V. D. Barnes, '15H, and H.
MacDonald, grad.; relay races-C. W.
Ditchy, '15A, chairman, R. S. Collins,
'16, and W. "S. Shafer, '16; tug-of-war
-H. S. Parsons, '15E, chairman, T. P.
Soddy, '16E, and G. A. Bergy, '15P;
cap night-A. W. Mothersill, '15, chair-
man, A. R. Griffis, '15E, C. L. Cross,
'15D, and H. C. Rummel, '161,.
Prof. Hussey Returns to Ann Arbor
Prof. W. J. Hussey, Mrs. Hussey, and
son Rowland arrived in Ann Arbor
Monday morning, after having sp'ent
the last six months in La Plata, South
America, where Professor Hussey has
been director of the University de La
Plata. The party sailed for the United
States on January 28.l

e phar:
t nighi
owingi

..{U.
U ~-m m

/re

'NOT TO THE STRONG IS THE BATTLE.-"
is a fine quotation, but
fR. GERALD STRONG, 15D.
The wizard of the Stradivarius has cowed 7,000,052
savages and won nine battles with the mystic
power of his violin. lie will appear at

MOVE YOUR EYES TO THE RIGHT AND GAZE
upon three of the sixty sweet voiced songbirds
who compose the
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB
incomparable in grace, beauty, and soulful song,
they will appear at

-.
.

The Band Bounce

1I

FRIDAY 'NIGHT

25c.

HILL AUDITORIUM

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