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February 20, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-02-20

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THE DAILY
EVERY MORNING
$1.50

he

Sh igan

Daily

I SUBSCRIBE

98.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

, ._....

RACK EVENTS
HOME SEASON
rinceton*Relay Race to be
ded by Annual Winter
ish Between Sophs
and Fresh

A

OF STARS,
N STILL HOPE

Arraction Will be the Veteran
Tiger Quartette Against the'
Untried Wolverines
chigan's "at home" track season
e launched tonight when a double
will be staged in Watermann gym-
im, the Wolverine Varsity meeting
eton in a two-mile relay race af-
he freshmen and sophomores have
it it out for supremacy in their
al winter clash.
e same restrictions which gov-
the handling of crowds in Water-
gym last year will rule this sea-
nd ut 500 rooters will be permit-
i the building tonight.
e battle between the teams of the
lower classes promises to be un-
.ly dlose, with both squads boast-.
pore than the average number of
The sophomores will be ham-
Iby the loss of three of their best
who have been drafted onto the
ty relay squad, lut the winners
.st year's fresh-soph meet con-
:ly expect victory.
e relay race will attract the chief
est. with a veteran Princeton
ette pitted against a green and
rifle quartette. The Var-
* the final event on the
h the rmen or sophomores
wiU ~ipartipate in tonight's dual
1,0dlge in very strenuous
outs dy dfteruoon,
. mauy o them were in the gym
throulgh 'light eercise. hr-
f the fresh squad sprad his
and will be out of the meet,
P of the most closely contested
s Rnl tonight's program should be
ille. The freshmen trve Dennee,
'y, Gallowy and Meehan, while
ops are banking upon :Fihleib
Kuivinen. The loss of Carroll,
mian and. Donnelley, who are to
Sganst Princeton, will serously
en the 1917 squad, although both
eigh and Kuivinen have shown
lent forin.
0. Robinson should be found to
e strongly in the 880, if he runs
svent, for durng the trials for the
:eton relay quartette, R0inson
i in a record that surprised Coach
all considerably. Siadford, the
Arbor high school lad, will com-
in the 889, and the local product
big contingent of followers,
almost looks as though the sophs
take as many places in the pole
as they have vaulters entered at
nt,. for none of the" freshiman
I has shown any particular abil-
rtel who tied for third place in
high Jump in the trials for the
team spraine his ankle yester-
.ternoon, and will be out of con-
on entirely Both Halstead and
4mond beat him a week ago, and
"Les" Waterbury and Corbin en-
from the sophomore class, it is
:ful whether his absence will ma-
ly weaken the yearling squad.
>field, the freshman sprinter who
een sjowing to particular advan
in the ,35-yard dash, has entered
e quarter mile also. Scofield ran
40 in prep school in Denver, and
kay prove a surprise to the en-
s in this event, for he has done
ttle work over the three and one-
lap route. Burby and Robinson,
ver, seem destined to fight it out
nitial honors, although a dark
may figure unexpectedly.

TODAY
Fresh-Soph track meet and Michigan
vs. Princeton relay race, Waterman
gymnasium, 8:00 o'clock.
Membership dance at Union9 :00
o'clock.
Chess and Checker club meets at l-
ion, 7:30 o'clock.
Highway course luncheon, Barbour
gym, 12:00 o'clock. "
TOMORROW
I. K. Pond will talk on "What Archi-
tecture Means to the Everyday Man"
at the Union, 3:00 o'clock.
Cosmopolitan club meets in Harris
hall, 4:00 o'clock.
Dr. Max Heller speaks on "Moral Cour-
age in its Bearing Upon Modern Con-
ditions" at the Union services in Hill
auditorium, 7:00 o'clock,
Inter-elass Relays to Start Saturday
Inter-class relay race plans, now
being made by Intramural Director
Rowe, schedule the first race for next
Saturday night: Prospective candi-
dates should report to Director
Rowe at once to participate in the try-
outs. He is at Waterman gym every
day from 3:00 o'clock to 5:00 o'clock
in the afternoon, and from 7:00 o'clock
to 9:00 o'clock inthe evening.
a "
TIGER RELAYTEAM.
REMANS DUESTION
Quartette Arrives This Morning at 8:12
O'clock on Ann Arbor
Railroad
MEN COMPETED IN PENN RELAYS
Princeton's two mile relay team ar-
rives in Ann Arbor at 8:12 o'clock this
niorning. Just what the exact compo-
sition of the team will be is a matter of
doubt, but news from the Tiger camp
seems to imply that MacKenzie, Hays,
Cooley, Abia and Barr are the men
who will journey here from the east.
These five men, with the addition of
Barnett, who is no longer eligible, were
the Princeton entries in the 1914 Penn-
sylvania relay carnival, and each one
is a man who has had experience in
intercollegiate competition of the first
class. With a team of four, composed
froml the gbove five, Princeton finished
Offlr in the two mile relay, being bested
by Illinois, Michigan, Chicago, and
Darnouth, in the given order.
Michigan's entries for last year were
Haff, Jansen, Murphy, Lamey, and
Griest, and from this list not one of the
men is eligible for competition this
year. Mchign's entries in the relay
scheduled for tonight are all. men who
have had no intercollegiate competitive
experience, with the exception of Car-
roll who ran In the medley relays at
Buffalo on February 3.
Hays, the Princeton star half-miler,
has an unoficial record of one minute
and 55 seconds in this distance on an
outdoor track, and Mackenzie, although
his regular distance is the mile, has
been running the half lately, and is
said to be a close second for his bril-
liant teammate. In the face of such
odds as these, Coach Farrell preserves
a hopeful smile and says that the Mich-
igan quartette will acquit itself with
(Continued on Page 4)
DAWSON TO TALK AT MEETING
OF COSMOPOLITANS TOMORROW

B: H. Dawson, '16, will give a talk
on, 'Some Impressions of South Amer-
ica" at a meeting of the Cosmopolitan
club tomorrow afternoon at 4:00
o'clock in Harris hall.' Owing to the
increased membership of the club the .
Sunday afternoon meetings will nowI
be given in Harris hall instead of the
old club rooms in the Press building.

UNION BOA9T CLUB
STARTS CAVIPAIGN
John S. Leonard Cooses Comnmittees
for Work of Securing New
Members .
ECN6AISIi EN 1EV 4COURSE HIl)
John S. Leonard, 'l6L, is completing
his lists of men who will take charge
pf the Michigan Union Boat club cam-
paign for members, which will open
fire next wednesday following a mon-
ster smoker at the Union. The eligi-
bility of men appointed to take charge
of the work in the various schools and
colleges, has practically been confirm-
ed for the whole number. The names
will be posted in a day or two.
Soliciting will be carried on with
the various schools and colleges as
bases. A general chairman will han-
dle the work in each, and will be as-
sisted by 0a chairman for eac'h of the
four classes in his department. Each
chairman will secure a large number
of committeemen to carry on the can-
vass over a certain portion of the
campus. The schools of Dentistry,
Pharmacy and Medicine will be re-
garded as a combined department with
one general chairman and 11 chairmen
to assist him.
Special efforts will be made among
the faculty men, and students have
been appointed to carry on this end
of the work. Any student or faculty
man may register for $1.50, but all
who have paid fees to the Michigan
UTnion need pay only one dollar. All
who register in the incipient campaign,.
will be entitled to participate in con-
tests at the Boat club regatta which
will be held on the H1uron river in the
latter part of May, and will be eligible
to attend the club, dances, dinners,
smokers and other meetings.
Last year between 300 and 400 men
enrolled in the campaign held last
spring, and a much larger number is
expected for this year. Members com-
leted laying out a triple English l1en-
ley course on 'Barton pond on the (lay
of the J-hop, and besides backing the
proposed inter-class and.Varsity crew
racing, have distributed pamphlets and
lectures on resuscitation.

R~IFLE TEAM RAISES-
TOTAL IN CONTEST
Score Against Nebraska Brings Squad
Near Top in Intercollegiate
Contests
,l. it. UOSER GETS HIGHEST SCORE
Michigan's Rifle team shot against
Nebraska yesterday afternoon at the
Ferry field rifle range, boosting its
total 10 points above last week's score
against Rhode Island State, the sum
of the scores of the five high men
being 923.
In case of a defeat of Nebraska by
the Michigan team this week the av-
erage of the latter will increase as
the Nebraskan's average decreases,
thus placing Michigan in a tie for first
place with Yale alone in point of
games won, and above Nebraska in
point of percentage.
J. P. Thompson, a freshman, featur-
ed yesterday afternoon's match by tie-
ing L. C. Wilcoxen, with a score of
186, for high man among the first five
who had significant scores. Thomp-
son fell eight points short of a perfect
standing score, and six points below
a 100 score from prone. Wilcoxen's
prone score was only four points be-
low the perfect score, but he register-
ed only 90 from a standing position.
J. R. Moser secured the highest
single score with a 97 prone target,
but his 82 off-hand cardboard kept his
total below the mark, which would
put him among the men whose records
are counted in the official scoring of
the team. G. C. Curtiss also turned in
a 97 prone target, but his standing rec-
ord fell, when, on his last shot, with
a possibility of scoring 188, he missed
the target and registered a 178 score.
Ann Arbor's armory will be open
from 1:00 o'clock to 5:00 o'clock today
for the purpose of giving instruction
to all inexperienced members of the
Rifle club, who will receive lessons
from the older men on the team.
The live men who turned in the sig-

nificant scores together with

DR. MAX HELLER PROMINENT IN
TULANE UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES
Jewish Rabbi to Talk at Union Services
in Hill Auditorium Tomorrow
at 7:00 O'clock AT FINAL MEETING

their

Dr. Max Heller, of Tulane Universi-
ty, who is to speak at the Union ser-
vice to be held in Hill auditorium Sun-
day night, on 'Moral Courage in Its
Bearing upon Modern Conditions" is
one of the most prominent Jewish rab-
bis in this country. However, for the
past several years his activities have
been centered in his work at Tulane
University, and the work which he has
done in the promotion of Jewish cul-
ture and ideals has been aside from
the regular position which he is now
filling.
He is also prominent in the journal-
istic field, and for many years he has
been editor and associate editor of
the American Israelite, the foremost
American Jewish periodical. For two
terms, he was president of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis, the
highest honor within the gift of his
colleagues, and he is at present a
member of the executive board of that
organization.
The music for the service will be
furnished by the choir of Temple Beth
El of Detroit and Rabbi Leo M. Frank-
lin of Detroit will read the full Jev-
ish ritual service.
HOCKEY HONORS TO
BE STAKETOIGHT
Science and Senior Lit Sevens Will
Battle in Finals for Puck
Championship
NEITHER TEAM HAS LOST GAWE
Campus hockey honors are at stake
in the, final match of the inter-class
series to be played at Weinberg's rink
at 6:00 o'clock tonight, when the sci-
ence seven meets the senior lit puck-
chasers In what promises to be the
best game of the season. Neither ag-
gregation has lost a game to date, and
both teams boast some fast skaters.
The team that is to receive the sec-
ond set of numerals, has not yet been
decided, but the three elimination
matches will probably be played off
next week, if the ice stays. The fresh
engineers play the combined senior-
junior engineers on Monday night, the
winner of this match meeting the law
team for the chance to play the losers
of Saturday night's game.
The science and lit teams will line
up as follows for the title match to-
night:
Science Lits
Cochran.......... G .......Springer
Waara....... ...... P , .. .iimacher
Burrel........... C P .... Kneebone
Christianson...... C ..... Cohen
Mead ....... ... R . . Wic dnborner
Campbell........L W '.. . . Underwood
Richards.........R W .......Cobane
Mechanical Engineers Will Plan Tour
Mechanical engineering students and
all others interested in the annual
mechanical engineers tour of inspec-
tion will meet in room 223, engineer-
ing building, Tuesday afternoon at
5:00 o'clock, to lay detailed plans for
this year's tour which will take place
during Easter vacation. The trip will
last ten days, starting from Ann Ar-
bor, April 10, and returning April 19,
and the itinerary will include Toledo,
Pittsburg, Washington, Philadelphia,
New York City and Niagara Falls, N.
Y. The mechanical engineers' tours
have been carried on for over twenty-
seven 'years, although omitted last

year to make way for the electrical en-
gineers' tour, and have carried as high
as 40 students, professors fpd others,
over the route.

Woodbridge N. Ferris Will Address
Members of Highway Corse at
Luncheon -in Barbour
GYM
LECTURES ON LAST DAY HAVE
VARIED BREADTH OF SUBJECT
Enrolled Visitors Draw Up Petition
Asking for Repetition of
Curriculum
Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris will
address the members of the highway
engineering course at a luncheon given
in their honor this noon in Barbour
gym. During the morning, the men will
be shown various points of interest
about the campus, with members of the
senior civil engineering class' acting as
guides.
Frank F. Rogers, state highway com-
missioner, closed the fifth'and last day
of the university's first highway course
last night with a lecture upon the sub-
ject of "Michigan's Roads." More than
135 engineers, road commissionersand
farmers were enrolled, and in attend-
ance at the final meeting of the course.
The program for the last day's work
opened yesterday morning with class-
room work and discussion in room 348
in the engineering building on the sub-
ject of "Surveys, Plans and Record
Drawings," followed by a paper read
by L. C. Smith, deputy state highway
commissioner on "The Organization of
Road Construction and Maintenance
Forces for Townships." The morhing's
Xfork was closed with a paper by W. W.
Cox, inspecting engineer of the Michi-
gan State highway department on "The
Organization of Road Construction and
Maintenance Forces for Counties," Yes-
terday afternoon the course was con-
tinued by discussions on the subjects
of "The Duties of the Township Road
Commissioner" and "The Duties of the
County Road Commissioners,' and was
closed by a paper read by' E. N. Hines,
of the Board of County Road Comnii
sloners of Wayne County, Michigan, manr
"The Road Plan of Wayne dounty and
the Result." The day's program was
completed with Rogers' lecture last
night.
During the course of the afternoon's
proceedings a petition, signed by near-
ly all of the visitors enrolled in the
course, was presented asking the reg-1
ents of the university for a repetition
of the course next year, and the pub-
lication of the minutes of this year's
course.
SENIOR LITS DINE WEDNESDAY
Dean Cooley and Professor Wenley
Are Speakers
Dean M. E. Cooley, of the college of
engineering, and Prof. R. M. Wenley,
of the literary college, will speak at
the senior lit banquet to be held at
the Michigan 'Union next Wednesday.
Louis K. Friedman will be the class
speaker, while Emmett Connely will
act as toastmaster.
This will probably be the last ban-,
quet given by the class this year,
and the social committee is endeavor-
ing to secure a large attendance. Sev-
eral musical numbers will be arrang-
ed.
Tickets may be secured at the Un-
ion desk, or from members of the sen-
ior lit social committee., The price is
60 cents.
Fifty Tickets Still to Be Distributed
Tickets to the Princeton relay meet
and Fresh-Soph track meet went be-
fore the general student body at 3:00
o'clock yesterday afternoon, and when
the office closed there were still about
fifty of the admission cards left. This

limited number will be distributed
among applicants this morning begin-
ning at 9:00 o'clock. The exchange
may be effected by the presentation of
the athletic book at the athletic asso-
elation office.

nina 6 are listed below ;
Stgd.
.. P. Thompson .... 92
L. C. Wilcoxen .... 90
W. J'. Schoepfle ... 89
R. S. Anderson .. 87
A. C. Simons......88

Prone Total
94 186
96 186
96 185
96 183
95 183
. 923v

PRO IlITtON

UN FIA9ST U M'ETING

TOTAI,

Temporary officers appointed yes-
terday at the first meeting of the In-
tercollegiate Prohibition Association
were: President, Everett Judson, '16;
Secretary, Rufus'Osborn, '15; Treas-
urer, George McDowell, '15. Perma-
nent officers will be elected at a meet-
ing to be held at McMillan hall at 4:30
o'clock February 27.
The original chapter of the Inter-
collegiate Prohibition Association was
founded at Michigan several years ago
but was abandoned. Mr. Crainner of
Syracuse, N. Y., the traveling secre-
tary of the Association, was in Ann
Arbor about two weeks ago and was
instrumental in the organization of
the present chapter. At present there
are about 50 members in the local
chapter including many men of promi-
nence in campus activities.
ARRAN(x' SPECIA tt PRO GRAM S
~AN I MUSIC FOR CMIUI DAN CE
Boat club members will hold a duance
on Washington's Birthday, at the Un-
ion. A five-piece orchestra including
a saxophone artist, and F. H. Grover,
a tenor soloist, will furnish the music.
R. M. McKean, '16, will act as chair-
man, and the chaperons will be Prof.
W. D: Moriarty and Mrs. Moriarty, and
Prof. F, H. Stevens and Mrs. Stevens.
'Tickets at $1.00 now on sale at the
Union couniter are selling rapidly, and
special programs are on the press.
Punch with wafers will be served at
the east end of the hall, and surprise
features are being planned.

hOL SECOND SONGR EHEARSAL
OF IPERA CHORUS CANDIDATES
Another singing practice was held
by the tryouts for the chorus of the
opera "All That Glitters" in the big
hall at the Union last night. For more
than an hour the candidates rehearsed
the various songs under the direction
of the writers of the music. Candi-
dates for the chorus will hold a re-
hearsal again today at 1:30 o'clock in
McMillan hall,
Until a letter comes from Director
Sanger, General Chairman K. Baxter,
'15E, will be unable to post the list of
successful men, It is probable, however,
that the names of the chorus will be
announced tomorrow,
FA CVLTY ADOPTS RESOLUTION
A,4fAINST PROBATION STUDENTS
At a meeting held on January 11, the
faculty of the literary college adopted
the following resolution: "Any stu-
dent renders himself liable to suspen-
sion for a break of discipline, who,
while upon probation, engages in any
public exhibition, contest, game or
other public activity."
Although the faculty has always had
the power to take such action at its
discretion, the above statement was
made to show how it stands on the
matter. The rule does not apply to
students on warning, but the same
punishment could be meted out to any
violator of the warning regulations if
the faculty saw fit to do so.

._... _ -

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THE GERMAN IRON CROSS
APPEARS IN T1lE PICTURE TO THE LEFT
Cross your bridges before you come to them and get your ticket for the

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FAIDAY, FEBRUARY 20

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