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February 17, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-02-17

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Michigan

Daily

I SUBSCRIBE
I NOW

_.. .

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1915.

L TRYOUTS
FR DILL
Candidates Toss Ball
Vaterman Gym
in Practice
sterday
DHANCES APPEAR
FOR CIAIMPIONSHIP
Base and Shortstop
Remain Open
New Men
rsity ball-tossers took
rkout yesterday after-
rman gym cage, more
es turning out for the
inite word as to the
undgren's arrival has
eived, but the Wolver-
>ected today or tomor-
idson, Flynn, McNa-
d Caswell worked out
yesterday's practice,
lenton, Lambert and
e receiving.
ng of the second week
ce in the Waterman
>us followers of the
re already discussing
ce of again copping
e baseball champion-

f '

_. _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _
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- ., ; - -

TODATY
Varsity gag id rehearsal for
Bounce." Tiversity l1alR
O '-lock.,

"Band
7:00

TOMORROW
Complimentary faculty concert in Hill
auditorium, 4:15 o'clock.
Forum meets and discusses, "Is the.
Marking System at Present in Force
in the Various Departments Satis-
factory?" at the Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Eight Week club will meet in New-
berry hall, 7:00 o'clock.
DESIRE SPECIALTY
ARTISTS, FOR PLAlY
Director of "All That Glitters" Wishes
Meii with Vaudeville Skill to
Appear within Two
Weeks
EARL' MOORE TO TEST SINGING
ABILITY OF CHORUS TOMORROW
Hi Cornell to Make Complete Model of
Second Act Laid in
Atlantic City

'erine nine swept
of the larger col-
teams, winning 22
splayed, and run-
166 runs to 74 for
This was Coach
r at Michigan, and
Ic of the fans ex-
better this spring.
is unusually for-
x of the nine po-
:eam filled by vet-
and of these, but
,cted to cause any
> dearth of availa-
catching and first

he brightest fielding star
infield and hi, timely
any a game for the Wol-
ras Baker who held up
se of the Michigan team,
men going at their best
ould have meant defeat,
is causing Captain Mc-
atest worry right now.
y, Labodie, Sisler and
>n available for garden
eld is causing no worry.
, Captain McQueen and
the only veterans left.
leader will of course
3 old position at second
ghitt may be shifted to
rtstop post. Perry How-
irst will not be -severely
of last year's All-Fresh
class man.
e of Sisler, Ferguson and
ast year's pitching staff,
Volverines of a reliable
while Flynn, McNamara
of Lavan's All-Fresh
>ut for a place. In addi-
e a number of men who
ed from the inter-class
e fighting for a Varsity
f Webber, receiver and
i the 1913 Varsity, leaves
hout the services of a
er, but there is a wealth
r the backstopping posi-
coach is not losing any
department. The pres-
" Enzenroth, Varsity
atcher in 1,310, relieves
.he care of his backstop
a. large extent, and the
rine star should be of
the irnexperienced men
e reguiar receivers must

Men who have talent are wanted by
the director of the Union opera to try
out for specialty numbers. Those who
have ability along vaudeville lines are
asked to appear within the next two
weeks.
The first singing tryouts for the
chorus are scheduled for 7:15 tomor-
row night. Earl Moore, head of the
organ department of the school of
music, and writer of the music for sev-
eral former productions, will judge the
candidates. By the end of the week,
dull cast parts will be distributed to the
successful men, and all lyrics, lines.
und angs wll he arned by March 1,
when the regular rehearsa will com-
mence.
Ii Cornell, professional scenery
man for B. C( Whitney, was in Ann
Arbor Monday, and will make complete
plans for entirely new scenery. He
will design a model for the second act,
which has a setting laid at the board
walk of Atlantic City. Several unique
electrical features will make this scene
spectacular.
Director Sanger took a copy of the
book with him to New York City, and
will effect a complete change of the
setting of the first act, which was to be
laid in a New York beauty parlor. Mr.,
Cornell will then produce a model of it.:
At a meeting of prospective writers
of next year's opera at the Union last
night, 12 men appeared. The men were
instructed to write a synopsis of the,
play, give the method with which they
expect to work out their ideas, and sub-
mit it about March 1. The director
will go over each man's work with him,
and offer suggestions and changes.
The completed copy will be called for
about May 1. It was also suggested
that some lines or situations refer to
local affairs, provided that none of:
them be of such a character as could
not be understood by an outside audi-
ence:
The costumes for the opera will
probably be furnished by the Ames
company, of New York, the largest cos-
tumers there.

HOLD THOUTS FOR
RELAYTEAM TODAYT
Coach Farrell to Time Every Man Who
Expect to Compete Against
Tiger's Quartet
Saturday
UFER FOUND ELIGIBLE; SCARE
COMES FROM CLERICAL ERROR
ligh-Jumpers and Pole-Vaulters Have
Workout Yesterday; Make No
Records
Tryouts for the relay team which
will oppose the best that Keene Fitz-
patrick can send to Ann Arbor from
Princeton, will be held this afternoon
n Waterman gym, Coach Farrell's stop
watch being the opponent of every man
who expects to run against the Tiger
relay quartet when it journeys, here
Saturday. ,,
'Ufer appeared at the gym yesterday
afternoon, and brought with him the
fact that he will be eligible for compe-
tition this year, a clerical error alone
being responsible for his recent scare.
In upholding the honors of Michigan in
the distance and middle distance
events, however, he will be without the
assistance of Murphy and Lynch, both
of whom, according to latest reports,
will be unable to arrange their eligibil-
ity.
The work scheduled for this after-
noon will be in the form of half mile
jaunts around the track for all aspir-
ants for the relay team which meets
Princeton Saturday. The tryouts are
not limited to this afternoon, as those
who cannot appear today will be
allowed to runtomorrow. As the men
report to Coach Farrell, they will be'
timed in their race around the oval,
and by Friday the selection of the team
will be made.
Waterbury and Berray worked at the
jumping standards early yesterday af-
ternoon, the honors seeming to be
about evenly divided, while the bar
was below five feet six inches, and
after the pair had worked above that
point, the high-jumpers vacated the
floor in favor of Ferris and Wilson,
who took to pole-vaulting. Nothing
phenomenal happened in this telit,
Wilson being easily able to top the bar
at its highest point. Because the
standards are not high enough no re-
markable feats could be performed.;
Lapsley worked out ii the dashes,
and easily led his field, in which, how-
ever, there were no stars pitted
against him. Corbin managed to take
the tape in two heats, in which he op-
posed the freshman sprinters, Robin-
son not running in these trials.
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION BOARD*
ISCUSSES CHANGES IN RULES
Propose That Elections Follow First
Semester to Ascertain Matter
of Eligibility
Discussion of proposed changes in
the rules governing the annual mid-
term elections to the board of directors
of the athletic association, featured the
meeting of the directorate yesterday
afternoon. Definite action was post-
poned until a future meeting, at which
time a committee authorized to conft
with representatives of the faculty eli-
gibility board, will bring in its report.
The proposed alterations in the rul-
es will probably result in a change in
the time of the election. Under the
present regulations the balloting is
held prior to the semester examina-
tions. It is proposed that the election
come after the examinations, in order
that eligibility questions can be settled

before the candidates are voted on.
Varsity Track Manager W. B.
Palmer was.chosen as the chairman of
the directorate yesterday afternoon,
and by virtue of his chairmanship is
the president of the athletic associa-
Lion. Varsity Football Manager Boyd
Compton, appointed yesterday to fill
the vacancy on the board, took his
seat for the first time at the meeting.

If Put Into Effect, Representatives
Meet to Draw Up Definite
Detailed Plans.

to

CLLEGE ELECTION
E .K.
Athletic Association Board Gives Its
Approval to General Campus
Seheme for Choice
of Officers
PUBLICATION BOARD'S ACTION
WILL DECIDE FINAL ADOPTION

Favorable action taken yesterday by
the board of directors of the athletic
association gave further impetus to
the movement fostered by the Michi-
gan Union directorate, looking to the
establishment of a general campus
Election Day, at which time officers
for the Union, the athletic association

and the board in control of student Cast
publications are to be elected.
The directors went on record as fa-
vorable to the general plan advanced

of "Pomander Walk" Successfully
Steps From Amateur Fields
to Professional
Drama

by the Union officers. This plan calls
for the handling of a single general
election, at which time all the stu-
dent officers in the three organizations
shall be selected.
Action by the publication board
alone remains to make the proposed
Election Day a certainty. Prof. Fred
N. Scott, chairmnan of the board, and
Prof. Gordon Stoner, the -treasurer,
stated last night that the board would
consider the proposition if brought be-
fore it.
If the board in control favors the
plan, it is expected that representatives
from each of the three organizations
will be appointed for the purpose of
drawing up detailed plans for the
Election Day. It is stated to be prob-
able that the election would come
sometime late in May.
MICHIGAN RIFLE TEAM SCORES
6,099 OUT OF POSSIBLE 8,000
Members Show Steady Improvement,
Progressing From Mark of
861 to 91
Michigan, in the three intercollegiate
matches held under the National Rifle
association rules, according to unoffi-
cial figures, has been represented by 13
men who have scored a total of 6,099
points out of a possible 8,000 foi per-
fect score. The individuals, with a
possibility. of averaging 800 with per-
feet scores for each man in every
match, have made an average score of
607.
Steady improvement has been the
keynote to the work of the Rifle team
up to the present date. Starting out
with a score of 861, they followed this
the next week with an 899 score, which
was beaten in the next two matches by
totals of 903 and 913. The work which
has been done in the past has shown
results in this constant bettering of the:
team total for the high five men, and,
in the opinion of President H. Moul,
eng. spec., the team, with additional
practice, is capable of even higher,
scores.
The number of matches participated
in, the total score and the average of
every man who has shot on the Michi-

AUDIENCE APPLAUDS WORK OF
MARY TRUE, '15, AS MARJOLAINE
Walker Peddicord as Sir Peter, .and
S Magaret Reynolds Win
Approval
MarJolaine saw "Pomander Walk" as
the troubled, blissful center of the
universe, after love had stepped in and
played havoc with the quaint old nook

,to send messages from 9:00 o'clock to
11:00 o'clock, every evening except
Sunday. Hitherto, but one man has
been stationed to take and receive mes-
sages, and then for only two periods
a week.
The local station has been in con-
nection with the University of North
Dakota, the University of Pittsburg,
Ohio State and Washington University
for some time past, and can now re-
ceive messages from a distance of 3,000
miles, under average conditions, be-
cause of the addition of an "augment-
er."
DISPLAY ,TALENT IN,
CO0MEDBY C LUB PLAY

WIRELESS STATION WILL SEND
MESSAGES ABOUT EVERY NIGHT
With a force of three operators, the
university wireless station is prepared

Captain-elect Cochran has issued a
list of names, comprising the likely
squad of football aspirants for next
fall's Varsity eleven. He expects the
men to engage in the indoor training
that will commence in the gymnasium
as soon as the various candidates can
arrange a specific time for the work in
their respective schedules.
There will probably be seven squads
training at different times while the in-
door work lasts. These will be as-
signed to Captain Cochran and others
of last year's squad, namely Rei-
mann, Dunne, Zeiger, Bastian, Hildner,
Norton, Millard and Roehm. The Var-
sity men who graduate this June,
Raynsford, Hughitt, James, McHale
and Bushnell, will be on hand to help
in the direction of these squads.
The Varsity men and candidates who
are training for baseball and track will
be excused from this indoor work. A
number of the men are also engaged in
class basketball, and thus will be able
to keep in good condition for the spring
practice.
The following list does not represent
the entire squad which is expected to
respond to the call for candidates in
the spring, but any whose names do
not appear here, and who expect to do
some indoor preparatory work may
find it convenient to join one of the
squads mentioned above.
The names of the members of the
squad as known at this time follow:
Captain Cochran, Watson, Reimann,
Benton, Staatz, Zeiger, Lyons, Maul-
betsch, Bastian, Catlett, Hildner, Lam-

of the world. A less impulsive but
appreciative audience saw that color-
ful, flower adorned square last night
as the scene of some genuine acting,
an appealing atmosphere of subdued
humor and unstilted emotion, and the
successful attempt of an amateur cast
to step across the bounds of conven-
tionality into the professional fields of
realistic drama. -
The efforts of the Comedy club, in it2
thirty-first annual performance last
night at the Whitney theatir, to depic
the influence of love on those of al
stations and ages, amid a setting lai
in the early days of the nineteenth cen
tury, can best be characterized as de
lightfully pleasing. Few discordan
notes were sounded, and a unity of at
mosphere ran through the play from
beginning to end.
Mary True, '15, handled the leadin
role in a natural, unrestrained manne
that placed her at the head of the lis
of applause-gainers. Her infectiou
smile relieved what might have been
with- different portrayal, a somewha
tedious rendition of the lovelorn Mar
jolaine.
The boisterous Sir Peter, in the per.
son of Walker Peddicord, '16L, brougt
a laugh at every turn, while Mrs. Pos-
kett, Margaret Reynolds, '17, was af
successful in winning the approval o'
the audience as she was in winnig f
hand of the cautious Sir Peter. 'B
tween them lay the most realistic rai
acter portrayal of the performance
MarJolaine's mother and fiancee
Phyllis Povah, '16, and Morrison W ood
'17, respectively, effectively uphel
their parts with dignity. Miss Poval
was the proud matron throughout, on]
unbending and showing gracefully 3sw

L Dunn, Smith, Raymond, Will Sc
d Pobanz, Ewert, Howe, Brown, N
- Hendrickson, Foster, Rehor, M
Don James, McNamara, Burney, I
t schultz, Robins, Sharpe, Ingham,
- ford, Willis, Menefee, Roehm, W
Graven, Willard, Whelen, Finkt
Cohen Neimann, Brownrigg, Re
g Brazall, Franzheim, Randall, H(
r beck, Scheiman, Mullin, Richa
t Smith, and Gardner.
, REV. RAYMOND OPENS 'SERI
it, OF WEDNESDAY TALKS TON

PRICE FIVE CENTS.
FOTBALL PLAYERS
TO WORKOUT SOON
Captain-Elect Cochran Issues List
Containing Names of Likely
Candidates for
Fall
SILL DIVIDE ASPIRANTS INTO
TRAINING SQUADS FQR SPRING
Will Excuse Tryouts for Baseball,
Track and Basketball From
Practice

gan team up to date follows:
Matches Score

.. S. Toplon Wis Sophomore Contest
In the Varsity preliminaries for the
Northern League contest, J. S. Toplon
won the sophomore trials last night
with an oration on "Legalized Murder."
G. W. Hulbert was chosen alternate.
The senior preliminaries will be held
at 8:00 o'clock tonight in room B of the
law building.

G. S. Curtiss, '16E...... 3
J. P. Thompson, '18.... 1
J. R. Moser, '15E.....3
L. C. Wilcoxen, '16E... 4
J. E. Snider, '15.......4
C. B. Marks, '16L......3
J. D. Steere, '15........4
R. S. Anderson, lit. spc. 4
A. C. Simons, '16E..... 4
W. J. Schoepfle, '17E... 3
F. W. Wood, '16.......2
I. B. Clark, '17E.......2
M. B. Cutting, '17E.... 3

547
181
537
713
699
527
701
686
685
507
328
323
479

Ave.
.182
.181
.179
.178
.177
.176
.175
.171
.171
.169
.164
.161
.160

ceptible to the spirit of youth and love
at the very end.
Ethel M. Buzley, '15, Elsie Apfel, '16,
Grant Cook, law, Frances Hickok, '15,,
and John Switzer, '16, all belong on the
roll of honor, but none of the players
are rightfully left off.
Fresh Engineers to Hold Dance Feb. 25
Fresh engineers will hold a dance at
the Michigan Union on Feb. 25 from
9:00 to 1:00 o'clock. Refreshments
will be served. The chaperons will be
Prof. H. J. Goulding and Mrs. Gould-
ing and Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Moriarity.
Tickets will be on sale from 11:00 to
12:00 o'clock today outside of Dean
Cooley's office.

As the opening lecture of a series
of Lenten talks that are scheduled to
be given in St. Andrew's Episcopal
church at 7:30 o'clock on the six Wed-
nesday evenings during Lent, the Rev.
William 0. Raymond, of the English
department, will speak tonight. Prof.
J. S. P. Tatlock, of the Enw-sh depart-
:nent, .wil delii-er the first of a series
of lectures on 'Liturgies" at 4:30
o'clock tomorrow, and on Friday af-
ternoon at the same hour, and in the
church, Prof. Robert M. Wenley will
speak.
The Thursday afternoon meetings
will be under the direction of the
Michigan chapter of the Brotherhood
of St. Andrew and the Episcopal Girls'
club, and those which are scheduled
for Friday afternoons will be under
the supervision of the Hobart Guild.
Beginning at 4:30 o'clock next Tues-
day afternoon, the Rev. Henry Tatlock
will deliver a series of weekly Lenten
lectures.
Announce Chaperons for Union Dance
Chaperons for the membership dance
at the Michigan Union Saturday night,
aie Prof. H. T. A. Hus and Mrs. Hus,
and Prof. Filibert Roth and Mrs Roth.
Tickets will go on sale at the Union
counter at 50 cents for members, to-
morrow afternoon.

I

,J

A .; D 4

THIS YOUNG LADY IS
Miss TERPSI CORE

1

THE TWO CORES, TERPSI AND EN, WILL
PLAY PROMINENT PARTS IN THE COMING

This Young Cent1
EN C

B-A-FN
READ THIS Y T 1
on the campus
make February

I-D B-O-U-N-C-.E
Besides Terpsi and En, The cleverest men
have burned 162 gallons of midnight oil to
26th the brightest day since creation.

I* her brother
ORE

t p

A

Pwh

. ..
.
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