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February 13, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-02-13

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Ie

Michigan

Daily

SUBSCRIBE
NOW

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1915.

I.IORSN

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1 C ' f
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I
E

Latest Innovation of Gargoyle Staff
Varies Monotony of Office Routine

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PEACE APHORISMS FROM
LECTURES OF DR. J. MEZ

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vi

Huebel

IUL TIESj

dents'

TODAY
Catholic Students' club dance, St.
Thomas hall, 2:00 o'clock.
Membership dance at the Union,-9:00
o'clock.
Chess and Checker club meets at Un-
ion, 7:30 o'clock.
Graduate club dancing party, Barbour
gym, 7:30 o'clock.
All-Fresh preliminary tryouts for
track, Waterman gym, 2:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Elbert Hubbard speaks at Union, 3:00
o'clock.
Charles W. Gilkey speaks at the Ma-
jestic, 6:30 o'clock.
BRAND BOUNCE PREPARATIONS
COMMENCE THIS AFTERNOON
Selections from "The Firefly" and
"Forge in the Forest" Will be
Presented

To
h
ro
w
be
w
mE
er
Ba
ha
es
be
Co
th
"C
th
i
Sc(
he
by
hu
a

The clock in the steeple, (no, Gene- ,atmosphere. Smokable butts were cast
eve, this is a different story), strikes into yawning waste baskets, and many
ur P. M. More editorial comment, was the hand that brushed back
Quite a prosaic hour!) The offices of tangled locks, which had gone to make
e student publications Were in an up- up the editorial aspect. Just as the
)ar. Fatimas were being smoked. noises were hushed on that wondrous
ords were being cussed. Noises were Christmas night, eons ago, when the
ing howled; and the gentle phrases shepherds and tie yise men crossed
hich for ages have marked Michigan the cooling sands, to give their gifts
en, were achingly lacking. The mod- and pay their tribute to the coming
n tower of Babel was being built, and King, so was the noise of the publica-
abel was being spelled babble (Har, tion rooms hushed.
zr, Joke!). Into the room walked a woman. Not
But to go on with the human inter- that a woman is a stranger in these
t. The air was blue with smoke and offices, but this woman had come on a
er supplications. Typewriters were different mission. She was followed by
ing slapped with undue vim, by un- two, then three more of her sex. They
ated gentlemen, and ever and anon walked to an open desk, and took pos-
ere came the cry of a lost soul, session with much firmness and zest.
imme a smoke!" 'Twas indeed, as Soon they were busy chatting, writing,
e poets and Frank Shulte say, an drawing and clipping mlagazines. "'That
eal setting for a crime or a love will get their agate; I bet someone will
ene. But 'neither occurred. And ringe when he reads that! That's AW-
rein lies the tale which is being told FULLY clever!" could be heard com-
these words. ing through the stillness. Merely the
suddenly, all these noises were women at work on the next Gargoyle-
shed. Not a breath was drawn. Not but you can't imagine the effect they
word crashed through the stilled are having!

"War is an anachronism." .
"In time of war prepare for
peace."
"War is the failure of human
wisdom."
"Military force can never decide
a moral question of right and
wrong."
"It is not true that the warlike
nations shall inherit the
earth."
"If there were no wars there
would be practically no poV-
erty."
"Political wars will finally be
considered as futile as relig-
ious wars."
"The only force that can perma-
nently alter the character of
society is a change in the
ideas of the individuals who"
compose it."
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PRICE FIVE CEr
,START 'ON MONO
Will Be Open to All, Especially
Road Commissioners and
Engineering-
Scholars
PRESIDENT HARRY B. HUTCHI
TO GIVE OPENING ADDlI
Instruction Staff Will Include D
M. E. Cooley, Professors
Hoad and Riggs
Following the example of other
versities, Michigan has institute

reports issued
3' football men
culty ban, as a
r examinations
wn and "Shor-
d to reach the
probable that
e to remain in
terday was the
h has been is-
eligibility of
following the
s. It is' stated
>ation because
the required
that Lyons is
on the latter's
nade.
vere dismissed
The 'athletic
ommittee met
t take up the
ball men. The
only was dis-
ot having jur-
at the present

Active work in preparing the pro-
gram of the "Band Bounce," which will,
be given Feb. 26, will begin at 2:00
o'clock this afternoon, when the band
will hold its first rehearsal in Univer-
sity Hall.
In this concert, the band is scheduled
to take a larger part than in the pre-
ceding one, and, in addition to en-
semble playing, several novelty num-
bers will be presented. One of these is
"The Musicians' Stike," a ,humorous
number, and a violin solo accompanied
by the band, by Gerald Strong, '15D.
The serious numbers will be selections
from "The Firefly" and the descrip-
tive overture, "Forge in the Forest."
Director H. E. Richards will arrive
from Detroit today, to direct the re-
hearsal, and he will also be present for
the rehearsal which will be held next
week.
TIJYDUTSFOTR EA
I H --OR T.9

TALK: ON ANTARCTIC DON'T PREPARE FOR,
CHARMS AUDIENCE ENEMIES-SAYS MEl

I

i
1

BORDEAUX PROFESSOR TO TALK
TO FRENCH STUDENTS MONDAY
M. Andre Le Breton, professor of
French literature at Bordeaux univer-
sity, will give an illustrated lecture
on, "Une Reverie Dans le Parc de Ver-
sailles," at 4:15 o'clock,. Monday, in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
M. Le Breton was formerly a stu-
dent in "L'Ecole Normale Superieure."
He has published a number of books,
the best known of which are: "Mad-
ame La Deputee" and "Le Crime des
Autres." Three prizes have, been
awarded Prof. Le Breton by the
French Academy. He was called to
Edinburgh in 1910, and to Madrid in
1913, to give several lectures.

short course in highway engineeri
which will open Monday and contin
throughout next week. The cou:
will be open to anyone, but will be g
en especially for highway commissio
era and engineers. The topics, cov
ing practically the entire field of rc
construction, will be given from
Michigan standpoint,
The instruction staff will inch
specialists in all lines of work, amc
those on the staff being: Dean M.
Cooley, Professors W. C. Hoad a
H. C. Riggs of the engineering colleg
Dean Charles M. Strahan, of the e
gineering department of the Univers
of Georgia; Prevost Hubbard, of V
nstitute of Industrial Research, Was
ington, D. C.; Prof. Ira O. Baker, of I
University of Illinois; Thomas H. Mi
Donald, Iowa state highway engines
O. L. Grover, of the office of Pub
Roads, Washington, D. C.; W. W Cro
by, of Baltimore, Md.; E. N. Hines,
the board of county road commisi:
ers, Wayne county, Michigan; a
Frank F. Rogers, W. W. Cox, L.
Smith, C. V. Dewart and K. I. Sawy
of the Michigan state highway depa
ment.
Each day of the meeting will be d
voted to a consideration of a distin
form of road building. Beginning F
day, a convention of the Southeaste
Michigan Roadbuilders will be held

Sir Douglas Mawson Gives Illustrated
Lecture on Explorations Before
4,000 Persons

Final Lecture of Peace Series Deliv-
ered with Subject "The Next
Practical Step"

POLAR MEDAL AWARDED BY KING INTERNATIONAL CLUB ORGANIZED

is stat-
. Lyons
play in

Preliminary Contests Will Occur To-
day; Finals to Come Sometime
Next Week
NEW MARK SET IN HIGH JUMP

V" Webb'r,>
d the only
his yearls

Preliminary tryouts for positions on
the fresh track team, which meets the
sophs a week from tonight, in the an-

Jly | nual indoor tilt, will be staged thisI

on th~e (111-
go~ 4)
IrRITP

U

lrand Rap-
Ral and
LL VOTE

afternoon in the gym, beginning at
2:30 o'clock.
The coach stated last night that
these trials would not be final, but
that he was holding them merely to
get a line on the ability of the numer-
ous candidates who are battling for
positions on the 1918 squad. The final
tryouts are scheduled to come next
week, although the impression created'
by the various performers this after-
noon may count considerably in the
final determination.
Fisher, a freshman sprinter, was
giving Captain Smith all that he could
desire in the way of competition yes-
terday, nosing out the varsity leader
in the 35-yard dash with a two-yard
handicap on one occasion, and barely
being defeated on the other. Robin-
son, another freshman sprinter, was
working out yesterday, although he
may not compete this afternoon. Rob-
inson, it will be remembered, ran 220
yards against time last year at the
interscholastic, covering the distance+
(Continued on page 4)
Cabinet Club Holds Term's Elections
Officers of the Cabinet club for the
present semester have been elected.
The new officers are: President, W. A.1
Warrick, '17E; vice-president, Roger;
Birdsell, '17E; secretary, K. F. Walk-
er, '17E; treasurer, L. F. Dieterich,
'17E; historian, F. F. Nesbit, '17. 1

Tall, strong and heroic looking, more
the viking of old than the modern
scientist, Sir Douglas Mawson made
his appearance in Hill Auditorium last
night, and, before an enthusiastic au-
dience of nearly 4,000 persons, deliv-
ered one of the most realistic illus-
trated lectures ever presented in Ann
Arbor.
SirDouglas was introduced by Prof.
Hobbs, who announced that the ex-
plorer had just received a cable from
London, stating that King George had
bestowed the Polar medal upon Sir
Douglas, one of the most distinctive
honors given to scientists.
In simple and modest language,
which, because of the heroic courage
and sacrifices described, was neverthe-
less thrilling, and held his audience
spellbound, Sir Douglas told the story
of his expedition. Time after time the
explorer was interrupted by enthusias-
tic applause. Mingling humorous anec-
dotes that occurred on the expedition,
with the tragic account of the death of
his companions, he presented a well-1
(Continued on page 4)
VETERAN BATTERY CANDIDATES
AWAIT ARRIVAL OF LTNDGRE-
Stewart Takes Workout for First Time
and Will Try for Field
or First Base
With the appearance of Soddy at
yesterday's baseball practice, Michi-
gan's list of veteran battery candi-;
dates was completed, and everythingl
is now in readiness for the arrival of
Coach Carl Lundgren. Payette, of
Lavans' All-Fresh nine, has not yett
put in an appearance, but the sopho-i
more is expected to come out earlyI
next week.
There was only a light drill yester-
day, many of the men not even don-
ning suits, though several of last
year's freshman aggregation were on
hand to get the kinks out of their mus-
cles before the arrival of the coach.
Captain McQueen paid the cage a fly-
ing visit, though he did not put on a
suit.
Stewart came out for his first work4
yesterday, the 1913 veteran having. so
arranged his work that he will be able
to try for a place on this year's VafI
sity. Stewart held down one of the1
fielding positions on the 1913 nine,s
and is out for either a garden job orl
the first base position this spring. I

"We should not prepare for possible
enemies, but against the possibility
of being drawn into war," said Dr.
John Mez, yesterday, in his final lec-
ture, entitled "The Next Practical
Step-The Conditions of Peace." "Pre-
paredness for war and armaments
does not make a country secure
against war. Sometimes big arma-
ments make victory easier, but in oth-
er cases they distinctly make the sit-
uation of a country more precarious
than it would be without armaments,
because they create fear, distrust and
war scares among other countries,
who unite and form alliances in order
to crush the miltarism they fear.
"Armament increases always react
upon other nations. If the United
States redoubled its navy, the jingoes
and imperialists of Japan would have
a new reason for asking for a larger
navy,-and thus the situation becom-
(Continued on page 4)'
ELBERT HUBBARD TO ADDRESS
TOMORROW'S UNION GATHERING
Appoint R. Hoffman General Chairman,
and Committee for Next
Two Meetings.
Elbert Hubbard, or Fra Elbertus, as
he is generally known, who is to ad-
dress tomorrow's gathering at the Un-
ion, has been described as a speaker,,
by the Houston Post, as follows: "Mr.
Hubbard does not 'deliver and ad-
dress' or 'preach' He talks; and he
talks delightfully. He never raises
his voice perceptibly to make a point,
but the style gets over in the three-
ibagger manner."
E. D. Slater, '17, E. A. Biber, '17, and
L. 0. Finch, dent spec., have been ap-
pointed to arrange the entertainment
for the next two Sunday Union gath-
erings.
Rudolph Hoffman, '15, has been se-
lected general chairman for the sec-
ond semester to replace Lyle Harris,
'15, who was unable to serve.
Reading Will Feature Graduate Party
Mr. R. K. Immel, of the department
of oratory, will give a reading on,
"The Servant in the House," before
the members and prospective mem-
bers of the Graduate club, at 7:30
o'clock tonight, in Barbour gym. Re-
freshments and dancing will follow
the reading.

Committee Consisting of Prof A.(
Mrs. Murfin and Miss Langle
Gives Approval
SALE OF TICKETS SATISFACT
Pomander Walk, the Comedy
play, which is to be presented
Tuesday night at the Whitney, ha
ceived the endorsement of the An.
bor center of the Drama League
ter witnessing Thursday night's
hearsal, a committee, consistin
Prof. A. L. Cross, Mrs. Josephine
fin and Miss Langley, recomme
that the League place its stamp c
provil on the production, and sue
tion was immediately taken.
At the close of the first day'p t
sale, last night, President L. 0, F
man, '15, announced that he was
usually well satisfied with the
ing made. The sale will conuti
day and Monday at Wahr's a d
be transferred to the Whitney
Tuesday. The entire lower floo
selling at $1.00 and the first ba:
at 75 cents.
Frances Hickok, '15, has entirel
covered from a severe cold, wH ic
reduced her voice to little more
a whisper, at the time of the J
presentation. In spite of the fact
her voice could not be heard be
the first few rows, her interpret
of the part of the love sick Bai
met with the unanimous approv;
all who witnessed the play.
Second Round in Hockey Ends To,
Hockey will close its second r
tonight, when the soph engineers
the combined senior and fresh lit
what promises to be one of the el
matches of the series, neither
having as yet lost a game. The r
is scheduled for 6:00 o'clock, and'
take place at Weinberg's skating'.

Engineering Society Holds Initiation
Triangles, junior engineering soci-
ety, initiated Harley Warner, '16E, and
Howard H. Phillips, '16E, at a recent
meeting.
LEAG6UE SANCTIDIS.
COMEDY CLUB PLAY

-

its in d
y mo
er in t

B.

Beal, of Ann Ar-
y nominated' for
;ency, by the Re-
ention in Grand
Zegent Frank Le-
s the other suc-
ving received 900
lates, Henry Ste-
n of Otsego, poll-
ulver, of Luding-
is.
ere not made un-
on, the early part
taken up with
ht of representa-
the credentials'

MOWN
_: of -

Theatre
Evening

ePOMANDER

WALK"

Tickets on sale
Wahr's Bookstore

Presented by
COMEDY CLUB

16th

$1.00, 75

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