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February 11, 1915 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-02-11

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I

e

Michigan

Daily

SUJBSCRIBE~
NOW
Wo0

- --

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1915.

- If

SILPRACTICE
GOPTIMISM
es Report for Second Phiy's
ArrihA of Fdruwer
ar Catcher Booms
Prospects
EXPECTS HURLERS To
)Y WHEN COACH COMES
s Light Workout foir Pres-
Hughitt Anxious to
Don Uniform

ith 16 battery candidates out for
second day's drill, Captain Mc-
n's smile broadened perceptibly
erday afternoon, and the Wolver-
leader now expects to have the.
ers ready for hard work by the
the coach reaches Ann Arbor.
arrival of "Jack" Enzenroth, Var-
catcher in 1909 and 1910

in 1910,

gives

ock another boost, as
Aiver should prove of
to the young pitchers
iring the preliminary

Varsity
aniother
:erdav's

baseball captain
interested spec-
\vorkout in the

the former Wolverine
.ast year's nine were
e practice. Hughitt,
vidson were out, but
onned a suit. Sisler
an appearance at the
nd the veteran twirler
;ht work for the pres-
king no chances with

, McNamara, Mc-
Bowles worked in
ton, Hill, Shepard,
rt doing the receiv-
a freshman who
>n before coming to
ret definitely decid-
be able to come out
g .or not, but he
; is hands off a lya"l
he gym yesterday,
a great surprise, if
aseman finally an-
nination to try out
again.

TODAY
Dr. ,John:M'z le ectures on "The Place
of Force in Modern International-
ism" in Newberry hall, 4:00 o'clock.
Cosmopolitan club banquet, Newberry
hall at 6:00 o'clock.
Prof. Anesaki, of the Imperial Uni-
versity of Tokyo, speaks on "Jap-
anese Art" in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall, 4:15 o'clock.
All-Medic smoker, Michigan Union, at
7:30 o'clock.
Meeting of wrestling club in trophy
room of Waterman gymnasium,'7:15
o'clock.
TOMORROW
Prof. Anesaki speaks on "A Prophet of
Japanese Buddhism" in Alumni Me-
morial hall, 4:15 o'clock.
Dr. John Mez speaks on "The Next
Practical Step-The Conditions of
Peace," in Newberry. hall, 4:00
o'clock.
Sir Douglas Mawson gives an illustrat-
ed lecture on "Racing With Death
Through Atarctic Blizzards" in lHl
Auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Catholic Students Hold Annual Dance
Members of the Catholic student's
club will give 'their annual pre-Lent
party at 2:00 o'clock Saturday after-
noon, at St. Thomas hall. Those pre-
senting membership tickets will be
admitted.
'U NCE-FEATURES
1814OPRST S
Waldo Fellows and Gordon Eldredge
Secured to Take Leading
Parts in Entertainment
WILL MAKE JOINT APPEARAANCE
Waldo Fellows, '14, and Gordon El-
dredge, '14, well-known as campus en-
tertainers, have been secured to take
the leading parts in the "Band
Bouncq," which will be given in Hill
auditorium on February 20 . Word was
received from them yesterday to the
effect that they were prepared to put
on an act in which they will a'pear
together. They Wvill also appear in-
dividiially.
Fellows was the star comedian in
the last two Union operas, "Contrarie
Mary," and "A Model Daughter." Be-
sides taking part in practically all of
the vaudeville shows, he was a mem-
ber of the "Midnight Sons'" quartet.
Eldredge's career in campus dra-
matics was similar, as he took part in
the same operas, playing the leading
female role in "A Model Daughter,"
and often appeared with Fellows in
vaudeville entertainments. Both he
and Fellows are living in Detroit at
present.
EMINENT BIOLOGISTS MAY USE
STATION WITHOUT ENROLLING
Biologists of eminence, to a limited
number, will hereafter be accorded the
privileges of the biological station,
without regular enrollment in the
summer school, upon merely paying
the camp and the health service fees,
as a result of action taken by the
board of regents yesterday.
Tt was also voted to name the new
laboratory at the biological station,

the Doughss Houghton laboratory, in
memory of Professor Iloughton, who
was one of the first professors in the
unive rsity.
President Hutchins Named as Delegate
President Harry B. Hutchins has
been named an official delegate of the
association of American 'Universities
at the conference on Medical Educa-
tion, to be held in Chicago, February
15, 16 and 17..

JAMES R.GARFIElD
SPEAKS ON FEB.22
Former Secretary of Interior Will Be
Chief Speaker on Washing.
ton's Birthday
Program
4OV FERRIS AND LEGISLATORS
WILL BEINVITED TO ATTEND
Prof. A. A. Stanley and Vocal Soloist
Will Furnish Music for
Occasion
Hon. James R. Garfield, of Cleve-
land, 0., former Secretary of the In-
terior in President Roosevelt's cabinet,
will be the principal speaker on the
Washington's birthday program, to be
given in Hill auditorium at 2:30
o'clock, Feb. 22. The law faculty will
give a luncheon for Mr. Garfield at the
Union, after which an informal recep-
tion will probably be held, in order
that students may meet and talk with
him.
Prof. A. A. Stanley, of the school of
music, will play the organ, and a vocal
soloist, not yet selected, will complete
the musical part of the program. Ar-
rangements for the occasion, details
of which will soon be prepared, are in
the hands of Harry D. Boardman, '15l.
The governor of the state and mem-
bers of the legislature will be invited
to attend.
TO SUSPEND CLUBS' ACTIVITIES
Musical Organization Will Hold Next
Rehearsals in Spring
Activities of the combined Glee and
Mandolin clubs will be suspended until
after spring vacation, according to a
statement made by Manager David R.
Ballantine, '16, last night. No rehears-
als will be held until after that time,
but negotiations for the out-of-town
trips that are under consideration, will
be continued.
There is a possibility of another
home concert being given late in the
spring, although no definite plans have
been made as yet. The Pontiac trip,
which was announced as having been
arranged for some time ago, has been
cancelled.
STATE EXECUTIVE WILL SPEAK
AT FERRIS INSTITUTE DINNER
Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris will
speak at the annual Ferris Institute
banquet, to be held Friday evening,
February 19, at the Union. The com-
plete list of the speakers has not yet
been formulated, but will be announc-
ed later. Tickets for the dinner may
be obtained of Harold Kenaga, '17P,
Charles Neithercut, '16, or John
Hughes, '17D.
SCIENCE TEAM DEFEATS LAWS
IN INTERCLASS HOCKEY GAME
Playing an indecisive game, the sci-
ence team defeated the law sextet
last evening in the first match of the
second round in the interclass hockey
series, the barristers losing by the
narrow margin of 2 to 1.
Headed by Captain-elect Cochran of
the football squad, the science team
managed to score twice in the first
period, and until fate in the second
half this was the only scoring by either
team. The law score came when the
progress of the legal wings toward
the science goal was checked, and a
m'elee resulted, out of which the puck
jumped into the science goal.

The lineup and summaries follow:
Science (2) Law (1)
Campbell ...........C. ........ Reed
Rich ards.......... R.W. .. McClellan
Christianson....... L.W. .... Kronner
Burrel..........C.P. ... Sanford
Waara............ P. ....Stevens
Cochran..........G.......McCall
Score end of first period: Science 2,
Law 0; final score: Science 2, Law 1.
Goals: Burrel, Waara, McClellan.

HEGENTS CONSIDER
MIITARY PETITION
General Sentiment Seems to Favor
Some Sort of Instruction
Along Military'
Lines
MAKE APPROPRIATION FOR NEW
SCIENCE BUILDING EQUIPMENT
Purchase of Moving Picture Machine
for General Campus Use
Authorized
Military instruction at the University
of Michigan was considered at some
length by the regents at their meeting
yesterday, as a result of a petition re-
ceived from certain of the alum-
ni of the university. The pe-
tition was referred to a committee con-
sisting of President Harry B. Hutch-
ins, and Regents Hubbard, Hanchett,
Bulkley and Sawyer.
The general sentiment, as evidenced
in the informal discussion, seined to be
to the effect that some instruction
along military lines might be given,
but not to the extent of the purchase
of uniforms, etc.
An appropriation of $15,000 was vot-,
ed by the board for the purchase of
equipment for the new science build-
ing, and an appropriation of $19,750.50
for the building of the first unit of the
botanical gardens' greenhouse, on the
university property on Packard street.
The immediate purchase of a motion
picture machine was authorized, to be
used for general purposes about the
campus and to become a part of the
equipment of the science building.
A request was received from the
Michigan state board of examiners in
optometry, asking that certain courses
in optometry be instituted at the uni-
versity. The request was referred to
the deans of the medical schools.
Commander John Howard Rowen,
U. S. N., retired, was appointed to
take the place of Prof. H. C. Anderson,
of the college of engineering and archi-
tecture, who has been granted leave of
absence for this semester, in order to
'pursue railroad appraisal Work. Dr.
Joseph S. Laird, instructorn cliefnIs-
tryj has been transferred to the cur-
riculum in chemical engineering.
In order to permit the finishing of
the Helen H. Newberry residence halls
for women, the athletic association was
requested to find other quarters at its
earliest convenience..
Provision was made for a private
office for Dean Jordan in Barbour-
gymnasium, as in the past there have
been no facilities offered for private
interviews.
The request of Annie Peck, '78, for
the assistance of the university in a
mountain climbing expedition was de-
nied. The petition of the senior and
junior medic classes to be relieved
from paying the locker fee at the
university hospital was also denied.
A request that the museum be opened
on Sundays was laid on the table.
The board appointed Regent Sawyer
and Dr. Edmunds official representa-
tives at the conference on Medical Ed-
ucation, to be held in Chicago Febru-
ary 15, 16 and 17.
The Union Casualty Insurance Co.,
of Philadelphia, was awarded the con-
tract for the workmen's compensation
insurance.
Degrees and -nurses' certificates
were granted, and, after adjourning,
the regents made a tour of inspection
of the Helen H. Newberry residence
halls.

Bridge Tourney Will Begin Tomorrow
Contestants in the Union bridge
tourney resume play in the clubhouse
lobbies at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow night.
Renville Wheat, '16L, will have charge
of the affair.
Further entries will not be accepted,
but those who have been entered re-
cently will meet early at the Union
to make up for the matches which
they have missed. 'N.

DATE FOR SECOND PRODUCTION
OF "POMANDER WALK" CHOSEN
Next Performance to Be Given Feb.
16; Cast Is Declared Eligible
By Faculty
Due to the rise of unexpected cir-
cumstances, officers of the Comedy
club decided last night to give the
second production of "Pomander
Walk" Tuesday night, February 16, at
the Whitney theatre, instead of Feb-
ruary 19, as was previously announced.
As this will be the last appearance of
the players this year in Ann Arbor,
it is expected that the play will be re-
ceived as enthusiastically as It was at
the J-Hop performance.
To bring the acting to a state of
greater perfection, rehearsals were
recommenced immediately after the
last performance and will continue
throughout the week. The chief ob-
stacle to a second appearance has been
overcome, as not a single member of
the cast was declared ineligible by the
faculty after exams.
Seats for the performance will go
on sale at Wahr's book store, at 1:00
o'clock Friday afternoon. All tickets
will be reserved.
Bible Classes Will Banquet Tomorrow
Members of the Upper Room Bible
class and of the University Men's Bible
class of the Church of Christ, both of
which are conducted by Dr. Thomas
Iden, will hold a banquet at the Church
of Christ parlors tomorrow evening.
Present plans provide for an attend-
ance of 150. Rev. George W. Knepper,
of the Church of Christ, will- act as
toastmaster.
DR. MIl SPEAKS ON
INTERNATIONALISM
"No )Nation Can Attack Another Nation
Without Harming Her Own
Interests," He Says
TALK FOLLOWED BY DISCUSSION
Before an audience of more than
triple the number of persons;' ho at-
tended his first lecture, Dr. John Mez,
president of the International Federa-
tion of Students spoke yesterday on,
"The Economics of Modern Interna-
tioialism."
In opening his address at Newberry
hall, Dr. Mez quoted from the famous

PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TO PREPARE PLANS
FOR 6YM CHANGES
Board of Regents Passes Resolution
in Preparation for Much
M Needed Changes in
Building
NEW DRAFTS NOT TO PROVIDE'
FOR MORE THAN $50,000 COST
Agitation for Enlargement Began Last
Fall in Form of Petitions
s from Students
Waterman gymnasium will be al-
tered to suit the growing demand for
accommodations, according to action
taken by the regents yesterday. A res-
olution was drawn up authorizing the
preparation of plans and specifications
for such improvements, at a cost not to
exceed $50,000.
The text of the resolution as passed
by the regents, follows:
"Whereas, the great growth in at-
tendance has resulted in overcrowded
and unsanitary conditions at the Wat-
erman gymnasium, requiring increas-
ed capacity to meet the present de-
mands and care for future accommoda-
tions, be it
"Resolved, That the buildings and
grounds committee be requested to
prepare suitable plans and specifica-
tions for such improvements, as may
be necessary to meet the present de-
mands and provide for the future, at
a cost not to exceed $50,000."
Agitation for the enlargement to the
gymnasium was launched late last
fall, is the form of petitions circulated
among the student body, as the result
of an article in The Michigan Daily,
describing the inadequacy of the exist-
ing conditions.
MARKSMEN TO ELECT OFFICERS
Will Arrange Classes for Instructing
Inexperienced Members
Organization of the Ride club having
been well launched and three matches
having been shot, the executive board
has decided upon tomcrrow1nigt$a,
the time for electing perm a
cers of the body, those eleed premW
to the Christmas holiday being temn
porary officers. The time of meeting is
set at 7:30 o'clock, in room 311 new
engineering building.
Aside from the election of perma-

corner

CIH FARRELL SENDS SQUAD
ITROUGH PACES IN THE 880
lime Set for Princeton Meet Try-
Outs Which Will Be
Held Soon
ach Farrell sent a small squad of
le distance men over the 880-yard
yesterday, in an effort to assist
unners in judging their own pace,
h is of particular importance in
races.
x led Uf er and Donelley over the
mile distance in 2:09, which was
ond slower than the time set by
oach before the race. All three
e runners finished strongly, and
apparently have run the distance
derably faster, had the coach de-
. Farrell has set no definite time,
t, for the trials for places on the
which will be sent against
ceton, but expects to conduct them
atter part of this week and some
next week.
terbury and Corbin have been
.ing daily in- the high jump, and
ugh no startling records have
set this early, Waterbury has
progressing nicel'. Corbin, who
ed as a hurdler on last year's
. squad is a puzzle, but if he fails
ake good, he will be shifted back
Buzz" Catlett's running mate over

English statesman and diplomat, Dis- ra
raeli. "War is never a solution; it is cla
an aggravation," he said. The German in
scholar then further refuted the idea It
of making any economic or other gain tin
by war in modern times. al
"While in 1870," he said, "Bismarck ai
could have crushed France without w:
particular harm to Germany, today na- w:
tions are so linked together by trade ol
relations, invested capital, and other ch
business interests, that now no Etion an
can attack another nation ' Without at
harming her own interests."' 'Among of
the interesting topics which Dr. Mez
discussed were the capitalized inter- W
ests, especially armament firms, the
relations "between war and poverty, .W
between armaments and employment
and the attitude of the socialists to-
ward war. tb
Following the talk informal discus- qi
sions were held, the audience forming he
in groups to talk over the various be
phases of the international situation. th
Dr. Mez will lecture tomorrow at 4:00
o'clock in Newberry hall on, "The ei
Place of Force in Modern Civilization." be
He will also talk at the Cosmopolitan pr
club banquet in the evening. In

Iorld

erry hall. - The an
.e ninth anniversar
Several talks by
Lucators and a mu
given. George :

will

pier. 1 ii
e, the cele

Prof. Hobbs Contributes to Magauine
Prof. W. H. Hobbs, of the geology
department is the author of an article
on Edward Suess, the noted Austrian
geologist, appearing in the current is-
sue of the Journal of Geology. Pro-
fessor Hobbs is associate editor of the
journal.

Ferris has been working
yim, although indoor facil-
d jumping are poor at the

ident of the International
of Students, and Presider
James B. Angell.
The Varsity quartet will'
eral numbers, while Char
'16E, and W. C. Achi, '14
give solos.

--

DON ELDREDGE, '14

and

WALDO FEuLLOW8, '14

STAR

CAMPVS

COMEDIANS

fi the next BAND BOUNCE, Feb. 26. Got ready for a good tizm.

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