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February 10, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-02-10

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V, No. 89.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1915.

, .

BATTERY MEN HOLD
OPENINGPRA CTICE
Easy Workout in Waterman Gym
Marks Beginning of Season for
Varsity Baseball
Candidates
PAYETTE ADDED TO NUMBER OF'
PITCHERS ELIGIBLE FOR TEAM

TODAY
Dr. John Mez lectures on "The Eco-
nomics of Modern Internationalism,"
Newberry hall, 4:00 o'clock.
Dixie club meeting, Michigan Union,
7:00 o'clock.
H. H. Seely will address Commerce
club, economics building, 7:00

FOOTBALL MEN TO
WORK OUT IN GYM
Captain-Elect Coehran Will Divide
Candidates into Squads to
Be Trained by
Veterans
COACH YOST OUTLINES INDOOR
DUTIES WHEN HERE RECENTLY

MA1,Y PIMI E
DIRECTORS TO ACT
T r e a syre r - E l e t T fa p J>i n g S iec e m l s i n
Settling Difficulties and
Secretary Also Will
Ser- e
IRECTORS PLAX PRFVENTION
OF NO)lNE<ES WITH LOW M R1S
,Job Fee, '17L, Will Beconie Wolver-
ine Football Manager, if Semes-
ter's Marks Satisfy
Before the next meeting of the
board of directors of the athletic as-
sociation, which has been set for next

SUPERVISOR REDDINGTON TO
DINE WITH FORESTERS' CLUB
Paul d. Reddington, supervisor of
the Sierra National forest, will be the
guest of honor at the annual banquet
of the Forestry club, to be held at 6:00
o'clock tonight at Mack's tea room.
Mr. Reddington is returning west from
New Haven, where he has been giv-
ing a course of lectures on national
forest administration at the Yale For-
estry school.
Tickets &or the dinner, selling at
$1.25, are to be obtained of S. G. Fon-
tanna, '17, L. G. Ross, '16, A. K. Gal-
loway, '16, D. H. Bell, '15, J. D. Steere,
'15, or G. C. Hunter, grad.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.
1818 TRACK SQUAD
Farrell Starts Work on Yearlings to
Prepare for Fresh-Soph
Meet, Set for
Feb. 20
SPRINTS SEEM TO BE STRONG
POINT FOR INCOMING RUNNERS
Davis, Page, Gardner, Scofield, Carroll,
Robinson and Kretgschmar
Show Up Well
With the track meet between the
freshmen and sophomores scheduled
for the same night as the Princeton
relays, February 20, Coach Farrell
started yesterday to devote more of

Training Trip Takes
Seaboard for Early
Contests

Nine to

o'clock
Forestry club dinner,
room, 6:00 o'clock.

Mack's Tea

Assistant Coach Schulz Also
to Aid in Preparing
Aspirants

ExpectsI

Light battery practice marked the
first day's workout of Mlichigan's 1915
Varsity baseball team, and the return'
of the indoor cage brought joy to the
hearts of the student enthusiasts. Cap-
tain McQueen's official call for battery
candidates, issued yesterday afternoon,
is expected to bring out a still greater
number of would-be pitchers and
catchers for Lundgren's team.
The late installment of 'the cage
made yesterday's opening drill unus-
ually light, and the practices sched-
uled for the rest of this week will be
devoted to the loosening up of arms
and legs for the more strenuous ses-
sions that will be in order as soon as
Coach Lundgren arrives. Captain Mc-
Queen will take charge of the men un-
til the coach reaches Ann Arbor, and
he hopes to have the twirlers in shape
for real work by the- middle of next

TOMORROW
Dr. John Mez lectures on "The Place
of Force in Modern International-
ism" in Newberry hall, 4:00 o'clock.
Cosmopolitan club banquet, Newberry
hall at 6:00 o'clock.
Prof. Anesaki, of the Imperial xUni-
versity of Tokyo, speaks on "Jap-
anese Art" in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall, 4:15 o'clook.
All-Medic smoker, Michigan Union, at
7:30 o'clock.

Football candidates will inaugurate
their training season in the course of
the next two or three days, when all

those who intend to come out for the Monday afternoon, it is expected that
1915 Varsity will assemble in the gym- all of the new members will be eligi-

Coach Rowe Starts Class Track Work
Intramural Director Rowe has start-
ed the ball rolling in the department
of class track, and will be at Water-
man gym every afternoon so that class
track managers may report to him and
get their teams under way as soon as
possible. The gym will be open in
the evenings, and training may be be-
gun at any time seen fit by the team

nasium to be divided into squads to
work out under the guidance of those
veterans who will igraduate this year,
according to an announcement given
out last night by Captain-elect Coch-
ran.

UNION PROCLAIMS
NAME OF'15 OPERA

"All That Glitters" Is Title of
Play to Be Produced
By Mimes

Annual

The announcement that Payette, of
ist year's All-Fresh nine, would be out
or Lundgren's team gives the Wolver-
no's stock a big boost, as the sopho-
core hurler should develop into a
apable pitcher under the tutelage of
undgren.
Prospects for another winning nine
re brightthis year, and with all but
iree positions filled by veterans from
st spring's championship aggrega-
on, the Wolverines should be well
p in the rating when the 1915 inter-
>llegiate championship is awarded.
Yesterday's practice marks the be-
inning of the indoor grind that lasts
ntil the Easter recess, when the
)uthern training trip allows the men
> get out of doors for the early sea-
an contests. An innovation has been
.ade this spring in regard to the vaca-
on training trip. In. previous years,
te Michigan nine has journeyed
trough Kentucky, Tennessee and
eorgia on the April trip, but owing
the difficulty of getting satisfactory
ates, Manager Lang has arranged
ames with teams along the Atlantic
aboard for McQueen's men. Under
e new arrangement, it is believed
iat the trip will result in greater
nefit to the men than the old south-

HOLD MORE TRYOUTS NEXT WEEK,
"All That Glitters" is the name of
this year's Michigan Union opera,
which was written by Sylvan S. Gros-
ner, '14L. Although the plot of the
play has not yet been made known in
detail, the settings of the two acts
were announced.
'"he first act i laid in a New York
beauty parlor, and the second is a'
scene in Atlantic City. Complete de-
tails of the scenic productions will not
be made public until later.
After the first cast tryouts, the num-
ber was cut to about 25. Portions of
the play have been sent to those who
still remain on the list, and another
tryout will be held about Monday of
next week. The chorus has also been
cut to about 70 men, and a list of those
still remaining in the competition is
posted at the Union. Another tryout
for the chorus will be held .sometime
the first of next week.
Tryouts for the orchestra will prob-
ably be called about the same time.
COSMOPOLITANS TO HEAR NOTED
TALKERS AT DINNER TOMORROW

The indoor training is being con-
ducted in accordance with the plans
of Coach Fielding H. Yost, who stopped
off in Ann Arbor, January 26 and 27,
enroute to an alumni banquet in Grand
Rapids. While in the city, Coach Yost
addressed the likely candidates-65 in
number-in the engineering building,
and in the course of his talk urged
all of the men to work faithfully un-
der the direction of Captain-elect
Cochran, Captain Raynsford, Hughitt,
McHale, James and Bushnell, so that
they may be ready to engage in some
stiff outdoor practicercommencing
April 20, when he will return to start
spring practice for a couple of weeks.
Assistant Coach Schulz was also in
town at the time. He too will be back
for the beginning of the spring session,
and it is likely that he will remain in
full charge after Coach Yost has. left.
Royce A. Traphagan, Varsity tackle
on the 1913 team, has reentered the
university this semester, and may be
a candidate for the same position on
the team next fall.

J
f
i
t
t

ble.
At the time of the election last
month, Interscholastic Manager Mil-
lard, '16L, was the - only successful
candidate not under faculty ban. The
difficulties of Treasurer-elect T. Haw-
ley Tapping, '16L, which were not of
a scholastic nature, have since been
settled, and he is now eligible to take
office.
Phillip Middleditch, '15E, who was
elected secretary of the athletic asso-
ciation, adjusted his trouble with the
faculty immediately following his elec-
tion, and is now free to assume his po-
sition.
The scholastic difficulties of Joseph
Fee, '17L, will be finally decided by
his marks of the last semester. In
case his work was satisfactory, he
will take the office of Varsity football
manager for next season.
Members of the board state that
among the first matters to be consider-
ed in the board meeting will be a plan
to avoid repetition of the eligibility
trouble. Before candidates are voted
upon in the future their standings will
be closely investigated.
LE AR DECKS FOR BASKETBALL

FOUGHT AS CAPTAIN IN

managers.
Congressman to Discuss Insufficieicy
of Army and Navy at
Whitney Theatre

WAR

his time to the yearlings, in an effort
to draw some sort"of a line on the
ability of the candidates. The fresh-
soph meet will be held Feb. 20 instead
of the varsity, as announced.
The coach stated yesterday that try-
outs would be held in all of the sched-
uled events, although the time for these
has not been set. The 1918 squad ap-
pears particularly formidable in the
sprints, and will undoubtedly pit sev-
eral men against O'Brien, who may be
the sole sophomore representative.
Prominent among the freshmen sprint-
ers are Davis, Page, Gardner, Scofield,
Robinson, Kretzschmar and Carroll.
Several freshmen have turned out
for the quarter, prominent among
whom at the present time are Kruger,
Henkle, Hardell, and Good. As yet no
startling time has been made by any
of the middle distance runners, al-
though Darnell, Wolf, Hayes and
Shadford have shown promise in the
half mile.
itn the mile, the1918 squad appears
strong-, Dennee, Boumna, Mehan, Gallo-
way and Cherry giving signs of possi-
ble development. The first year squad
should make a favorable showing in
event,: especially if any of the

"Safety First-How About Our Na-
tional Defense?" will be the subject of
a lecture by Congressman Augustus P.
Gardner, of Massachusetts, Monday
evening, March 15th, at the Whitney
theater. Mr. Gardner is considered the
chief advocate of "national preparea-
ness" in the country, and his recent
revelations in Congress regarding the

I

SIR DOUGLAS MAWSON SPEAKS
ABOUT ANTARCTIC TRIP SOON
Sir Douglas Mawson, the noted lead-
er of the Australian Antarctic expedi-
tion of 1911-1914, will give his illus-
trated lecture "Racing With Death
Through Antarctic Blizzards," in Hill'
auditorium at 8:00 o'clock Friday
night. Sir Douglas arrived in Amer-
ica about a month ago, and since then
has been lecturing in the principal
cities of the east. His lecture has met
with an enthusiastic reception, and
has been described as one of the most
wonderful andtrealistic productions
ever shown on the lecture platform.
The lantern slides and the motion
pictures with which the lecture will
be illustrated were taken by an expert
photographer who accompanied the
expedition. They are considered by
all who have seen them to be the best
of the kind ever produced.
HOCKEY TEAMS RESUME MATCHES

errs trip, when some of the hardest
games of the year used to be played
with little or no out-door practice.
MEDIC STUDENTS GiVE FIRST
SMOKER IN HISTORY TOMORROW
For the first time in the history of
the university, students of the Medical
School will give a smoker in honor of
the faculty at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow
night at the Union. Dean Victor C.
Vaughan and Prof. C. G. Darling will
speak. All class presidents and sev-
eral members of the various classes
will give short talks.
The committee in charge of the af-
fair, conposed of N. A. Myll, '15M, H.
A. Lichtig, '1IM, G. D. Treadgold, '17M,
and P. W. Beaven, '18M, has announc-
ed that several stunts of a surprising
nature will be presented by students
interested in the innovation.
Union Forum Will Not Meet This Week
- Owing to the fact that the large
room at the Union will be taken for
both tomorrow and Friday nights,
there will be no meeting of the For-
um this week. A session will be held
next week, however, and the meetings
will be held each Thursday until
spring vacation. A chairman will be
appointed to preside at each one. 3

Michigan cosmopolitans and their
guests will gather at their ninth an-
nual banquet, at 6:00 o'clock tomorrow
evening in Newberry hall. The pro-
gram will include talks by men of
prominence from all parts of the
world.
Among the speakers will be Prest-
dent-Emeritus James B. Angell, Sir J.
Bose, the Hindoo scientist, Prof. M.
Anesaki, Japanese exchange professor
at Harvard and Dr. John Mez, presi-
dent of the International Federation
of Students.
Tickets for the banquet are $1.00,
and may be purchased from Secretary
E. S. Sy, '15, Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, or
officers of the club.
Adelphi Society Elecs New Officers
Adelphi elected the following men
officers for the comhig semester at a
meeting last night: President, Glenn
M. Coulter, '15; secretary, Phil D. Hall,
'15; treasurer, Wallace Hall, '15; ser-
geant-at -arms, R. D. Rood, '17; orator-
ical delegate, Joseph R. Cotton, '16.
Plans for the annual banquet, to be;
held February 19 at the Union were
discussed, and the newly elected offi-,
cers gave a general outline of the,
plans for the year.-

Fereshmen Have Gym to Themselves
for First Weeks Practice
Interclass basketball now takes the
stage as foremost among the intra-
mural activities in progress, for be-
ginning this week comes the opening
of Waterman gym for practice, and
with this opening about 300 men are
expected to take lo p the indoor sport.
The gym will be open for practice
to freshmen teams for the first week,
after which another class will be al-
lowed to train its men on the floor.
Arrangements have been made where-
by the building will be open from 6:00
o'clock in the evening, until the regu-
lar hour for closing, thus giving added,
length to the time for practice, since
formerly the doors have been shut
during the dinner hour.
Intramural Director Rowe is at
present engaged in securing two men
to act as coaches to the teams while
the practice season is in progress,
hoping by this method to raise even
higher than last year the class of
basketball played in the interclass
league.
Collect Funds for Starving in Poland
Prof. S. J. Zowski, of the engineer-
ing department; chairman of the Polish
relief committee, announces the re-
ceipt of $391.50 in subscriptions, tow-
ards the relief of the millions of Poles
tarving in Europe. Posters gotten out
by the committee, have been placed in
Registrar Hall's office, and in several
State street stores, and subscriptions
or cash for this fund will be accepted
in these places. 4

alleged insufficiency of the America
navy and military have been com-
mented upon widely.
Mr. Gardner is a member of the ways
and means committee of the House of
Representatives, in which he has
served in six sessions. After graduat-
ing from Harvard in 1886, where he
was a classmate of Prof. A. H. Lloyd,
of the local faculty, he spent two years
in the Massachusetts senate. Later he
saw actual fighting as a captain in the
Spanish-American war.
For many years, Mr. Gardner has
been the disciple of national prepared-
ness, according to an article by Kend-
rick Scofield in the Washington Times,
Jan. 14. "Wandering through Europe,
he has taken note of foreign fortifica-
tions on every trip he has ever made,
later comparing his mental pictures of'
them with our own, setting us in his
mind the United States arny against
the forces of Europe; lining our navy
and their navies in battle arry against
one another, and drawing conclusions
as to the outcome of such a combat."
"Yet he became the active prophet of
preparedness," continues Mr. Scofield,
only when the opportunity to preach
the doctrine arrived on the wings of a
world war, filled with future possible
consequences to the United States, for
he says the public will never seriously
consider the likelihood of war during
the piping times of peace."
It is expected that Mr. Gardner's
local engagement will have unusual in-
terest in view of the agitation on the
campus for the introduction of military
training, and the present ai.ctivity in
rifle matches.

sophomore milers are placed on the
relay team to run against Princeton.
In the hurdles, Wickersham, a west-
erner has been shoywing fair form, and
if Corbin competes in this event, the
sophomore will have to step his fast-
est, according to the advance dope.
Varner, another freshman, has been
show ing to advantage in this event.
In the weights, Walls and Smith ap-
pear to have an advantage from the
present indications. Scott, Livings-
ton, Hough, and Golden have been pole
vaulting, although as far as the soph
meet is concerned, "Bo" Wilson should
win by a margin ranging between
12 and 24 inches.
Michigan's mysterious freshman
phe.nom in the high jump seems to
have disappeared, and Luther is out-
jumping his rivals a trifle at the pres-
ent. Coach Farrell stated that it was
too early to point out prospects, as no
one' has his position on the yearling
squad even half cinched.
Board Will Cusider All Delinquents
Members of the administrative board
will meet tonight to pass on the cases
of delinquent students. There are no
fixed rules by which students are au-
tomatically dismissed from - the Col-
lege of Literature, Science and the
Arts, but -students whose fate is in
doubt have been called to Dean John
It Eflinger's office for consultation.
The administrative board will pass on
the cases of such students, and the lit-
erary faculty will dismiss the unfor-
tunate ones at a meeting to be held to-
morrow night.
Freshmen May Change Elections Today
Freshm-en in the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts are making
changes in elections each day this
week. Upperclassmen may make
changes from 8:30 to 5:00. o'clock to-
morrow and Friday. After this time,
changes in elections may be made only
upon the payment of a fee of $1.00,
unless the change is necessitated by
the action of the faculty.

Combined Law Squad Defeats Sopli
Lits E it to One
Hockey teams caught up with the
schedule yesterday when the combined
law-soph lit game was played, after a
postponement of six days. It resulted
in a defeat for the soph lits by an eight
to one score.
The schedule for the second and
third rounds follows:
Second round-Today: science vs.
law; Saturday, February 13: soph en-
gineers vs. combined fresh and senior
tits.
Third round-Monday, February 15:
fresh engineers vs. combined senior
and junior engeers; Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 17: soph its vs. science; Satur-
day, February 20: law vs. science; soph
engineers vs. combined senior and
fresh lits.

Miss Humphrey 'Will Not Visit Here Alumnus to Contain Alpha Nu Story
As Miss Caroline Humphrey, pres- Copies of the February issue of the
ident of the national association of Michigan Alumnus will be -ready for
Collegiate Alumnae, will not Io able distribution on the twelfth, according
to appear in Ann Arbor this week, to W. B. Shaw, editor of the publica-
owing to illness in her family, the re- tion. The Alumnus this month con-
ception which was to be tendered Miss tains a lengthy account of the history
Humphrey tomorrow at the home of of Alpha Nu, written by DeanE. Rei-
Mrs. F. N. Scott has been indefinitely man, 'IOL, a practicing attorney in
postponed. Atlanta, Ga.

a
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