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January 24, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-01-24

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Michigan

Daily

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V, No. 87.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 1915.

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1~~*~~*~

ITUDENTS TO TALK
WEEKLY IN FORUM

Union Will Conduct Gatherings
Formal Discussion of Any
Topics Pertinent to
University

for

HOLD INITIAL SESSION FIRST
FRIDAY AFTER EXAMINATIONS
Encourage Consideration of Campus
Politics, Free Speech
Prevailing
Pursuant to plans and suggestions
formulated by H. Beach Carpenter,
'14-'17L, 'and Karl Mohr, '13-'15L, a
student forum will be conducted at the
Michigan Union each week during the
second semester, beginning with 7:00
o'clock on the first Friday' night, in
the big room. It may be necessary in
certain weeks to hold the meetings on
other than Friday nights, but so far
as practicable, it is planned to convene
at least once a week.
President P. D. Koontz, '14-'17L, will
appoint a general chairman, who will
have charge of the meetings and the
appointment of the different chairmen
for particular meetings. Men will be
appointed to conduct the sessions, who
are familiar with parliamentary pro-
cedure,t
Subjects which will interest differ-
ent classeq of persons will be chosen
for different nights, in order that the
control of the forum may. not pass in-
to the hands of a particular set of men,
interested in one line of discussion. So
far as possible, subjects will be an-
nounced several weeks in advance. Af-
ter the regular discussion at any meet-
ing, anyone may propose a subject for
extemporaneous discussion. Speeches
may be limited in length by the chair-
man in charge, or by rule.
Discussion of general campus poli-
tics will be encouraged, as well as the
issues in class politics. 'The policy,
however, will be to avoid class politicsi
in the concrete. The idea of practically
absolute freedom of speech will be -
fostered, except on matters of bad
taste, or those officially frowned up-
on. '
There will be no judges, resolutions7
or decisions. The only indication of
victory in a discussion can be gained
from the reports of the meetings in
the press.
Subjects will be stated in the form of'
questions so that the discussions may
not savor of debates. 'Suggestions for
topics of discussion frpm anyone will
be welcomed.
THINKS STUDENTS DEAR AND
AS FO1 SUDIOUSNESS--WOW
It is really an inspiration to play
hefore these charming college boys!
pain :Miss Heen Hoy, who sored4'
success as prima donna, in Saturday's
production of the "Quaker Girl," when
interviewed yesterday by a Daily re-
porter.
"Ann Arbor is such a delightful
place," she continued. "There is a
wonderful atmosphere of quiet and
study here. I was quite overcome
when I saw Memorial hall, It was one
of the best specimens of real culture
I have seen since leaving Berlin."
Miss Hoyt had been studying in
Paris and Berlin for five years when
war was declared. On this accour
she was forced to cancel her contracts
and return to America. When ques-
tioned in regard to her treatment by
the German officials, Miss Hoyt said,
"I found no one mo'e courteous than
the Germans. I was treated with
more courtesy and kindness 'han I en-
countered anywhere else"
Miss Hoyt was the guest of Prof. F,
N.-scott and Mrs. Scott while she was
n Ad Arbor, having met then last
summer iii Berli

. I.

TODAY
Lloyd C. Douglas speaks on "The
Tragedy and Comedy of a Youth-
Ruled Age," Majestic theater, 6:30
o'clock.
"Speechless" gathering at the Union,
3:00 o'clock.
Rev. A. W. Stalker speaks on "Sin in
Good Folks," First M. E. church, 10:30
o'clqck
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas. speaks at the
First Congregational church, 10:30
o'clock.
Rev. Leonard A. Barrett speaks on
"God, a Consuming Fire," at the
Presbyterian church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. Frank Bachelor speaks on "Unit-
ed Forces," at the First Baptist
church, 10:00 o'clock.
Rev. Henry Tatlock, at St. Andrews'
Episcopal church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rev Loring speaks on "The Real Gain
Made by Some Prophets," at the Uni-
tarian church, 10:30 o'clock.
Rabbi Isaac Rypins speaks to the Jew-
ish students in McMillan hall, 6:45
o'clock.
T0MORROW
Book exchange opened at McMillan
hall, 8:30 o'clock.-
'POMANDER WAL
PER FECTED FOR HOP
Tickets for Comedy Club Production to1
Go on Sale and Reservations
May Be Made Monday
NOTED PLAYERS PARTICIPATE
Every arrangement has been com-
pleted for staging "Pomandr Walk,"]
the annual i-Hop production of the
Comedy club, at 2:15 o'clock on Sat-
urday afternoon, February 6, at the
Whitney theater. Ticket reservations
may be made by communicating withI
L. K. Friedman, '15. The sale will start
February 3, at Wahr's, and continue at1
the Whitney theater on the day of theI
play.
Mary True, '15, astMarjolaine, and
M. C. Wood, '17, in the role of Jack
Sayle, head of the cast of sixteen, rep-
resenting the best-known talent on the
campus. Phyllis Povah, '16, as Mad-1
ame Sachenais, Walker Petticord, '16L,
as Sir Peter Antrelius, and Leon Cun-
ningham, '16, as Reverend Sternrod,
take prominent parts in the play.
C. A. Lokker, '17L, assumes the role{
of Lord Oxford, Margaret Reynolds,
'17, Mrs. Poskett; Frances Hickok, '15,
Barbara; Elsa Apfel, '16, Caroline
Thring; Grant L. Cook, '16L, Brooke
Hoskyn; Ethel M. Buzbey, '15, Ruth
Pennymint; John Switzer, '16, the Eye-
sore; H. H. pringstun, 17, Basil; and
E. F. Bankey, '17, the part of Jim.
H. L. Nutting, '15L, manager of club,
has directed the rehearsals, with the
assistance of Edward Sachs, '17, who
took part in Jessie Bonstelle's profes-
sional company during 1913. Constant1
rehearsing has brought the play to a
state of perfection seldom reached at,
Co long a time before the public pre-
sentation, so that indications point to,
the fact that J-Hop guests will witness
a finished production when the curtain,
rises for the Saturday matinee. ;
A representative will be at the Un-
ion from 7:00 to 9:00 o'clock tomor-
row night to make reservations for
the affair. This is the time at which

: booth space foi the hop is to be re-
served.
Dean Vaughan Will Speak to Farmers
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the med-1
ical department, will be the principl I
speaker at the farmers' insdtute, to be
held ,t Grand Rapids, Pontiac, Cold-
water and Saginaw during the week of
February 24. He will speak on "The
Prevention and Cure of Tuberculosi."

DENT PEDACOGUES
CONVENE TUESDAY

President Hutchins Welcomes More
Than 100 Delegates to 26th
Annual Teachers'
Convention
PROBLEMS BEFORE SCHOOLS OF
DENTISTRY TO BE CONSIDERED
Numerous Social Functions Planned
in Honor of Visitors'
Wives
President Harry B. Hutchins will
formally open the twenty-sixth annual
convention of the American Institute
of Dental Teachers, on Tuesday morn-
ing. The sessions ofsthe convention
will last for three days, from Tuesday
to Thursday, and more than 100 dele-
gates are expected to attend the meet-
ings, all of which will be held in the
dental building. An elaborate program
of addresses, lectures upon profes-
sional topics and general discussions
of problems before the dental schools
of the day, will constitute the main
business of the organization. Many of
the delegates will be accompanied by
their wives, and numerous social func-
tions are being arranged in their hon-t
or.
President Hutchins' address pf wel-
come will be responded to by Dr, B.1
Holly Smith, of the Baltimore Colleget
of Surgery. Following this, the presi-t
dent, Dr. Fred W. Gethro, of the North-
western University Dental school, will
deliver the annual presidential ad-
dress. After this address, there will.
be a general discussion participated in
by Dr. H. E. Friesell of Pittsburg, F.
B. Moorehead of the University of Illi-
nois, Dr. A. W. Thornton of McGillt
University, and Dr. J. H. Kennerly oft
Washington University. "The First
Chapter of the Operative Technic1
Booklet," which will be read by Dr. D,
M. Cattell of the University of Ten-
nessee, will close the morning session.
The principal paper of the afternoon
session will be, "Suggestions for Mak-1
ing the Dental Student a. Better Stu-,
dent Dentist," which will be taken up1
by Dr. Arthur G, Black of the North-t
western Dental school, Various prob-
lems of the modern dental school will
be brought up, and a general discus-I
sion will close the lecture, in which1
Dean Victor C. Vaughan of the med-
ical department will be one of the fourf
participants.t
Two papers will be given Tuesday
evening, the first, "Report of the Qom-t
mission on Prosthetic Thenics," by Dr.i
W. E. Willmott, of the Ioyal CollegeC
of Dental Surgeons, and the second a
report of the Commission on nomen-;
clature by Dr. F. B. Moore, head of
(Continued on Page 6).t

PENN RELAY MILER
TO SCRAP FOR JOB
Fishleigh, Lynch, Carroll and Ufer
Neck to Neck in Race for '14
Lap Position on Team
to Run Feb. 5
TRYOUTS FOR PLACES TO BE ON
WEDNESDAY OR ON THURSDAY
Meredith's Absence Boosts Michigan
Stock for Victory, Says
Bartelme -

Strong competition for the position
of miler on the Michigan relay team,
which meets Pennsylvania February
,5 in Buffalo, is promised, judging by
the performances of the runners yes-
terday.
Fishleigh lowered the present rec-
ord to 4:45 yesterday morning, but
Lynch grabbed the honors a short
time later, lowering this figure by
nearly two seconds. Carroll, the soph-
omore distance man, then took a fling
at the race, and completed the 14 laps
in 4:39 and 4-5. Ufer, the miler on
last year's Varsity squad, has not run
the distance against time as yet, but
will probably do so soon. Last year
Ufer proved a better outdoor man, and
the chances of one of the other con-
testants winning the place for the com-
ing event are good.
Coach Farrell announced that the
tryouts for positions on the team would
be held some time during the middle
of the week, probably Wednesday or
Thursday, or on both days, if they in-
terfere with examinations. The en-
tries nust be sent in by the end of the
week, which makes greater delay im-
possible, The alternate, from present
indications, will be a miler, as only;
five men will be taken.
Coach Farrell stated that Meredith's
absence from the quarter, would en-
hance M2ichigan's chances considera-
bly, as the "Penn Flyer" is in a class
by himself at either the quarter or
the half. The coach averred that he
did not wish to meet Pennsy with the
eastern institution weakened, as the1
race had been scheduled under the
presumption that Meredith would ap-
pear, but at the same time, the chances
for a Maize and Blue victory ame admit-
tedly better.
"Buzz" Catlett has been working out
the past two days, although he does
not expect to begin in earnest until
after the exams are over. The coach
said that he was letting the entire:
squad off easy on this score, but that,
after the next two weeks had passed,1
things would speed up considerably.

TONIGHT'S MAJESTIC MEETING
WILL HEAR LLOYD C. DOUGLAS
Y. M. C. A. Worker to Lecture on "The
Tragedy and Comedy of a
Youthi-Ruled Age"

Lloyd C. Douglas, general secretary
of the University of Illinois Y. M. C.
A., will speak at the "Y" Majestic
meeting at 6:30 o'clock tonight on the
topic, "The Tragedy and Comedy of
a Youth-Ruled Age."
Mr. Douglas spoke to university
women last fall at the time of the
"mobilization" meetings and was con-
sidered the best speaker on their see-
tion of the program. He has helped in
evangelistic campaigns at most of the
universities of the middle west. He
was a police reporter and later a
preacher in Washington, D. C., before
taking up his work at Illinois.
Some have misunderstood the recent
ruling of the city council forbidding
Sunday entertainments at the theaters,
and thought it would interfere with
the "Y" meetings, but these meetings
are exempt because no admission is
charged.
Rumored that Student Loses Valuables
According to an unconfirmed report,
a student of the junior lit class lost a
watch at $50 and $27 in money in the.
city Y. M. C. A. on Friday. Informa-
tion on the theft is'-scarce, as no men-
tion of it was made to the police.
RECENT SELECTIONt
PUZZLES DOPSTERS a

Beal, Leland, Culver, Stephens
Kiefer Names to Come Up
at Rep. Conventio11

PRICE FIVE CENTS.
CHAIRMAN ASSURES
PRETENTIOUS HOP
Distribution of Booth Space Will Be
Effected from 7:00 O'clock to
9:00 O'clock Tomorrow
at Union
JETER STATES CONSEQUENCES
OF ANY ATTEMPTED ROWDYISM
Few Tickets Still May Be Secured
of Louis Bruch, Who Predicts
Financial Success

and

Every Track Man in U. S. Will
Eat Dust Behind Farrell's Boys
. , 00

HOT SCRAP WAGED BY PRESS
With the Republican state convention
at .Grand Rapids only three weeks
away, speculation is rife regarding the
probable nominations for the regency,'
which will be acted upon at the spring
elections.
Competition has narrowedi down to'
five men, including both Regents Junius
E. Beal and Frank I1. Leland, the pres-
ent incumbents, William Culver of
Ludingtog, UHenry Stephens of Otsego
and Dr. Guy L. Kiefer of Detroit. Both
Judge James 0. Murfin of Detroit and
George Osius of Grosse Point, have
announced their withdrawals from the
race.
According to reports emanating from
headquarters of the state Democratic
central committee, the probable candi-
dates that will be chosen at the Dem-
ocratic convention, in Lansing, Febru-
ary 16, will be Frtank Eaman of De-
troit, and Regent William Comstock,
of Alpeaa.
charges and countercharges, some
of a more or less startling nature have
been -mae. epncerning several of the
candidates, by Detroit papers inter-
ested in the campaign. In one ,f these,
it is alleged that a book, dealing almost
entiroly with experiences in liquor'
shops, has been published by Mr. Ste-
phens, on the basis of personal expe-
rience while on a trip through South
America.
REPLACE TWO MATCH CHESSMEN
Kenna and LeFevre Players Who Take
Positions of Beers and Bruce
Two of the team captains in the
Harvard-Michigvn chess match by cor-
respondence, have been withdrawn and
replaced by substitutes. The new
players are R. K. Kenna, '17, at board
one, replacing D. M. Beers, and P. Le-
Fevre, '18, at board four, replacing A.
B.. Bruce
The team captains and their oppon-
ents, as a result of the substitutions
are as follows: Harvard, R. '. Kenna,
A. S. :fenberger, spec., R. Johnson,
'1k P. LeFevre, C. H. Fabens, '16L;
Michigan, Samuel Cohen, '1'.E, E. C.
Roth, '15, W. G. Given, '16E, Fred
Sacia, '15E, W. T. Adams, '17.

"This year's hop will be as elaborate
as we can make it with the limita-
tions and restrictions which have been
put upon us," said R. C. Jeter, '16E,
general chairman of the Junior hop
last night.
Decorators will come to Ann Arbor
today to begin preliminary work. They
wilj use the basement of Waterman
gymnasium to build the copings and
lattice work, which will be covered
with flowers and festoonings.
Booths will be distributed to ticket
holders at the Union from 7:00 o'clock
to 9:00 o'clock tomorrow night. Per-
sons holding 12 tickets will be given
an entire booth. Parties of 18 couples
may have one booth and a half, and
those consisting of between 12 and
18 couples may all go into one booth,
or flow over to an adjoining booth.
Since all the persons in any one both
will not occupy it at any one time, it
will be convenient for more than the
allotted number. Single booth space
will also be sold at this time to those
not connected with parties.
Chairman Jeter announced the pros-
pective chaperons to be as follows:
President Harry B. Hutchins, and Mrs.
Hutchins, Dean J. R. Effinger and Mrs.
Effinger, Dean M. E. Cooley and Mrs.
Cooley, Dean H. M. Bates and Mrs.
Bates, Dean V. C. Vaughan and Mrs.
Vaughan, Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Jordan,
Prof. A. H. Lloyd and Mrs. Lloyd, and
Prof. A. G. Hall and Mrs. Hall. Con-
trary to former plans, it is probable
that the chaperons will not have a
booth on the running track. Some are
reported to have said that they do not
wish to be upstairs, even though they
are "not particular about seeing too
much."
Jeter emphasized the fact last night
that no spectators will be permitted
at .the Junior hop. Neither faculty
men nor students, who are not regular
guests or chaperons will be permitted
to attend. He said that, if any kind of
trouble is caused by persons trying to
force their way into the hall, it wll
mean the final abolition of the func-
tion. He. also reiterated that the Jun-
ior hop is on probation this year, and
that any untoward incidents may con-
demn its chances for permanency.
Treasurer Louis M. Bruch, '16L, said
last night that there were still a few
tickets left, which might be secured
by communicating with him, and that
the function will be a financial suc-
cess. Members of the general com-
mittee may secure their admission
cards from him any hour today.
The various groups of independents
and others not in house parties were
still lacking unity last night. It seems
probable, according to. members of the
hop committee, that several distinct
parties will take place on February 6.
One reason for the failure of unifica-
tion is that the members of the groups
have not been able to agree on the
form which the parties shall assume,
whether dancing, sleighing or theater.
Show Chicago Art Work at Alumni Hall
Through special arrangement, the
collection of paintings by Chicago art-
ists, which has been on exhibition in
Alumni Memorial hall under the aus-
pices of the Ann Arbor Art associa-
tion during the past week, will be on
exhibition from 2:00 o'clock to 4:00
o'clock today. It will also be kept
on view daily until February 11.

Where has "Steve" Farrell been
keeping himself for the last weel T
two?
This is the question that has been
causing the campus sleuths oodles of
worry, and which, but for a happy
coincidence, would probably never
have been settled until Michigan had
copped the premier honors at next
spring's intercollegiates. Yes, that's
the dope, g.r.!
MICHIGAN IS DESTINED TO GAR-
NER THE U. S. OF A. TRACK CHAM-
PIONSHIP FOR THE YEAR A. D.,
1915. Startling news and yet true.
What's that got to do with "Steve"
Farrell's seclusion? Oh . we had
nost forgot. After hours of solemn
! hought 'neath the benign influence of
a green eye-shade, the great linament
artist has at last evolved a nYn fur
bettering his proteges'. r-ecrds by at
jeast 10 per ceht Not only will the
}nw stem bring great fame to Mich-
man's cinder sweepers, but also to, that

famous band which led the march 9ll
the way from Ann Arbor to Ahridge
and return last fall,
In fact, this band will assume the
leading role in "Steve's" new drama.
"Steve" has figured ut with mathe-
matical accuracy, the exact tempo of
each of his pets' strides when said
pet is running his particular distance
in record time. See the connectB
now? No?-
Well, "Steve" bases his calculations
on the reaso(nig that, if it is much
easier ta walk to the tune of a snappy
march, why wouldn't it be easter for a
track man to run under silar condi-
tions. So Michig'4 band is going to
be pressed into, service to bring glrTy
to the institution. As each o ,aeh-
igan's track artists reels , his event
at the intercollegaie, the band will
be trained Wv play. "The Victors" it
just a trifle faster time than that man's
average stride. Hurrah, fi "Steve"!

NOUN

!Now,

3Tonight
6:39

r

LoydDChouglas
CHAMPAICN, ILLINOIS

Majestic
Theatre

"The Tragedy and Comedy of a youth ruled age"

.. ,

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