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January 22, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-01-22

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Michigan.

Daily

NOW

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 22, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CE

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i """ 1

,..:lam.

IIVILB
CULTI

~T - r ~

ling Authorities
hroughoit
s for
rs
)R TO TAKE
JDENCE CLASS

TODAY
Recital of "Comedy ofI

Errors," SarahI

Universities
Staff

er school faculty
his year by leading
lleges throughout
as a result of the
pointments by the
ting yesterday.
e, is Prof. Roscoe
fessor of general
rvard, a recogniz-
s field. Professor
n equity jurispru-
econd half of the
6 to August 28.
Woodward, exec-
aw department at
unior University,
he course in sales
contracts. He will
Lto August 28.
professor of Amer-
Jniversity of Wis-
ngaged for two
tory department.
a former faculty
versity of Michi-

Caswell Angell hall, 8:00 o'clock:
"Flying Squadron" at Presbyterian
church,.2:30. and 7:30 o'clock..
Wright Saxophone Dance, Michigan
Union, :00 o'clock.
TOMORROW
"Flying Squadron" at Presbyterian
church, 2:30 o'clock and 7:30
o'clock.
Final Mid-west debating tryouts, room
302 north wing, 7:30 o'clock.
Pre-exam dance at Michigan Union,
9:00 o'clock.
SUCCESSFUL MEET
In Attendance and Work Accomplished
Gathering Ending Yesterday
One of Best
L.G. CARPENTER PRESENTS PAPER

RECEIVES RESERVATIONS FOR
PRODUCTION BY COMEDY CLUB
Ticket Sale For J Hop Performance
of "Pomander Walk"
Commences
According to reports from R. H.
Tannahill, '15,. reservations for seats
for the J-Hop production of "Poman-
der Walk," the Comedy club play, are
beginning to come in from various
groups that are planning to attend as
part of the week end program. To
avoid any conflicts with teas and in-
formal functions that are being ar-
ranged for the Saturday afternoon af-
ter the Hop, the show will start
promptly at 2:15 o'clock.
Because of a misunderstanding, the
Ann Arbor Drama League committee
did not witness a rehearsal of the play
yesterday afternoon. Other arrange-
ments will be made within a few days
for the committee to witness the pro-
duction, to determine whether or not
the league's approval will be granted.
Acceptance of the Comedy club's+
contracts for original scenery and cos-
tumes, were received yesterday from!
the New York firms which will supply
the stage effects.

UNION SECURES MEN OF HIGH
RANK FOR SUNDAY PROGRAMS
Rabbi Franklin and Elbert Hubbard
on List of Afternoon
Speakers
Starting with the Union's Sunday
afternoon program, of January 31,
members will have the opportunity of
hearing a number of men who rank
high in their various lines of work.
Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, of Detroit,
who is well known to Ann Arboir audi-
ences, will speak on Sunday after-
noon, January 31.
Dr. John Mez, president of the Inter-
national Federation of Students, will
make the address on February 7. On
the following Sunday, February 14, El-
bert Hubbard, the sage of East Aurora,
will make the afternoon talk.
Irving K. Pond, of Chicago, architect
of the proposed new Union clubhouse,
will speak on February 21, and the
Sunday following J. E. Walker, of
Lansing, socialist candidate for gov-
ernor, will talk.
SEVEN PROFESSORS WILL GIVE
EXTENSION LECTURES TONIGHT

CAPACITY AUDIENCE EXPECTED
AT DAVID BISPHAM'S CONCERT
University Women Selling Tickets to
Musical Event Set for
January 30
With a force of 60 university women
selling tickets for the David Bispham
concert, to be given on the evening of
January 30, in the high school audito-
rium, under the auspices of the uni-
versity Y. W. C. A., the outlook is
bright for a packed house. The seats,
which are not reserved, sell for 75
cents.
Students who wish to temporarily
relieve the tension of examinations will
be catered to, in view of the cheering
qualities attributed to Mr. Bispham.
Being a college graduate himself, he is
especially fond of university audienc-
es, according to a letter received from
him by friends in this city.
Seven Groups Agree to Take Booths;
Speeches Made by
Committee
REVENUE LESS THAN FORMERLY

TO SEEK $7509001
FROM LEGISLATUF
Regents Wi'ish to Enlarge Library i
Erect New Model Training
School Building for
Teachers
GRANT STUDENT PETITION FOR
FREE USE OF TWO GYMNASIU
Leave of Absence Given to Profess(
H.. C. Anderson and
F. W. Kelsey
In order to provide for the conte
plated addition to the general libre
and for the erection of a model sch
in connection with the educational
partment, an appropriation of $75
000 will be requested of the state D
islature, according to action taken
the board of regents at its meeting y
terday.
A petition from the student comn
tee for the J-Hop, asking that t
payment of the $50 rental of the t
gymnasiums be waived, was grant
on condition that this year's act
be not taken, as a precedent for futu
years.
Prof. F. W. Kelsey, of the Latin c
partment, was granted a six wee
leave of absence, to permit him to
to Italy to take possession of the u
published manuscripts of the 1,
Thomas Spencer Jerome, '84, w
made the university a beneficiary
his will.
Prof. H. C. Anderson, of the colle
of engineering, was granted a les
of absence for the second semester,
order to take up railroad apprai

armacy, Prof.
oma Universi-
e of several
my, in the
ill be given by
inderbilt. Mr.
nal embalmer
ye instruction
. Mr. Askin:
two seasons,
of the course

Ann Arbor saw the close of one of
the most successful annual meetings
of the Michigan Engineering society
yesterday. In respect to both attend-
ance and work accomplished, the con-
vention ranked among the best on the
records of the society.
The last formal meeting of the soci-
ety was held yesterday morning. What
proved to be the best paper of the ses-
sions, was delivered by L. G. Carpen-
ter, of Denver, Colorado. Mr. Carpen-
ter, who is regarded as one of the men
best acquainted with the legal side of
engineering in this country, spoke op,
"Interstate Water Questions."
Through the courtesy of the Eastern
Michigan Edison company, the engi-
neers were taken on a trip of inspec-
tion yesterday afternoon. Among the
points inspected were the Barton and
Argo dams and power houses, and the
university sanitary experiment station.
No decision was reached as to the
next meeting place of the society, De-
troit and Grand Rapids seeking to en-
tertain the engineers.
Several boxes of books, which are
the exchanges between the Michigan
society and those of other states, have
been left for students in the corridor
of the third floor of the new engineer-
ing building. Those who desire the
books may have them, as long as they
last.
REGENTS GIVE NEW TITLES TO
ALL UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTS

SHAKESPEAREAN CLASS GIVES
"COMEDY OF ERRORS" TONIGHT
Prof. T. C. Trueblood's class in
Shakespearean reading will offer a
public recital of the, "Comedy of Er-
rors," in Sarah Caswell Angell hall at
8:00 o'clock tonight. The cast will be
changed every scene so as to include
all members of the two sections of 40
students, and for that reason, the af-
fair will be a public recital rather
than a stage presentation. Admission
will be free, and those who attend are
requested to be in their seats by 8:00
O'clock.
THREE TO SPEAK AT
TODAY'S MEETING'S

, station, Prof. M. M.
versity of Colorado,-
zoology. Mrs. Ellis
if women at the sta-
rt, assistant profes-
Macalester college,
ill also give instruc-
Dr. F. C. Gates, now
t employ at Manila,
in botany.

"Flying

Squadron" Program Includes
Addresses by Trio of
Doctors

CRACK QUAKER RUNNER RULED
INELIGIBLE FOR COMPETITION
"Ted" Meredith, the Quaker's sen-
sational middle distance runner, has
been declared ineligible for college
competition, and will probably be un-
able to compete against Michigan in
the relay race at Buffalo, February 5.
Meredith ran under the colors of an
independent club during the last col-
lege term, thus rendering himself in-
eligible to compete with the Pennsyl-
vania track team for the remainder
of the year. His loss will be a severe
blow to the Quakers, for the presence
of the Olympic star would have given
them the shade over the Wolverine
quartet.
Play in Bridge Tournament Postponed
Contestants in the Union bridge
tournament will hold no pre-exam
round, but will resume play on the
first Friday after the hop. X R. Mc-
Call, '16L, who is at the head of the
tourney, will permit- a few more en-
tries, and will give the new men op-
portunity to make up for the three
rounds already finished.

Radical changes in the titles of the
various divisions of the University of
Michigan were made yesterday by the
board of regents, in an enactment des-
ignating the style to be used by the
university publications hereafter.
The literary department has been
changed to the college of literature,
science and the arts; the engineering
department, to the college of engineer-
ing; the pharmacy .department, to the
college of pharmacy; the dental, to the
college of dental surgery. The medical,
homeopath, law and graduate depart-
ments will be known as the schools
of medicine, homeopathy, law and the
graduate school respectively.
This change is brought about in or-
der to standardize the nomenclature,
in accordance with the last annual re-
port of the Carnegie foundation for
the advancement of education.
Rifle Team holds Final Tryouts Today
The final tryouts before the rifle
team is picked for tomorrow's match
will be held this afternoon, and the
team will be selected on the showing
of the 18 men on the squad. The team
will consist of the 10 men who have
the highest average for the last week.

OPERA BASSO TO FURNISH MUSIC
Speakers for the "Flying Squadron"
meetings today are Dr. Ira Landrith,
Nashville, Tennessee; Dr. Wilbur F.
Sheridan, Evanston, Illinois, and Dr.
Carolyn Geisel, Battle Creek.
Dr. Landrith is president of Ward-
Belmont, the largest college for wom-
en in the south. He was president of
the recent international convention of
the Y. M. C. A.
Dr. Sheridan is general secretary of
the Epworth League society of the
Methodist church. He is in demand as
a lecturer at colleges and universities,
especially in the south and east.
Dr. Geisel is one of the leading au-
thorities at Battle Creek Sanitarium.
She has studied at Petrograd, Russia,
and in Pasteur Institute, Paris. She
spends considerable time lecturing
throughout the state on sex hygiene
and other medical subjects.
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Butler, of
New York, are with this team to take
charge of the music. Mr. Butler was
formerly a leading basso with the Al-
ice Neilson Opera company.
Meetings will be held at the First
Presbyterian church at 2:30 o'clock
and at 7:30 o'clock.
Offer Course in Practical Journal~is
Practical journalism will be the sub-
ject of a course to be given next sem-
ester by Mr. L.L.Bryson, of the rhetoric
department. The course is intended
primarily for students who are inter-
ested in journalism, and who intend,
to follow up this line of work. It will
deal with the actual problems encoun-
tered in the newspaper work. The
class will be designated as course 14,
and will be given three hours a week.

Under the auspices of the university'
extension lecture service, seven lec-
tures will be given tonight. Prof. E.
C. Goddard, of the law department, will
speak at Bronson on, "The Trained
Man;" Prof. R. W. Hegner will talk
in Detroit on, "Phases of Insect Life;"
Prof. W. H. Hobbs will speak at Grand
Rapids on, "Glacial Life History of
Michigan;" Mr. R. K. Immel will give
a reading of, "The Servant in the
House," at Frankfort; Prof. J. W.
Scholl will talk at Niles on, "Liter-
ature, Fate and Personality;" Prof.
Aubrey Tealdi will talk on, "Civic Im-
provement," at Grand Ledge; and Mr.
H. V. Wann will lecture at Ionia on,
"Types and Scenes in Constantinople."
ATHLETIC BA9NQUET
Coach Yost, Director Bartelme, Capt.
Cochran and Judge Murfin
Will Attend
HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES INVITED
Coach Fielding H. Yost, Captain
"Bill" Cochran, Athletic Director Phil-
ip G. Bartelme and Judge James Mur-
fin, of Detroit, are all scheduled to
speak at the banquet to be given in
Grand Rapids next Thursday night by
the Western Michigan alumni assoct-
ation of the University of Michigan, to
the 1914 football teams of the Grand
Rapids and Muskegon high schools.
An attempt is also being made to
secure several members of the Michi-
gan Varsity to attend the banquet,
which promises. to be the biggest event
of its kind ever held 'in this state.
Coaches Upton, Mitchel, Holloway and
Gudelsky, will be on hand with their
respective teams, while many business
men have already signified their in-
tention of attending the affair.
Members of the alumni association
hope that the banquet will draw the
schools in the western part of the state
into a closer and more friendly re-
lation than has.existed during the past
few years. The banquet will be held
in the rooms of the Peninsular club,
and is being financed entirely by the
Western Michigan alumni association,
which has its headquarters in Grand
Rapids.
School Course Open to All Students
Contrary to general opinion, Prof.
A. S. Whitney's course in public school
administration is not confined to those
expecting to teach. The course, which
will be started next semester, is in-
tended for all students interested in
school work of any kind, and especial-
ly for those who intend entering pub-
lic life.

Members of the Junior hop commit-
tee were gratified by the fact that
more than 90 men turned out last night
to attend the acquaintanceship smok-
er which they had arranged. After
speeches by several members of the
general committee, those present met
one another and exchanged dances.
Seven groups to secure booths were
formed, each consisting of 12 men.
Besides taking booths, they will pro-
vide their own entertainments for the
Saturday following the hop.
R. C. Jeter, '16E, explained that the
committee had to do with $1250 less
than had been given to their predeces-
sors. The reduction in -the admission
price from $7.00 to $5.00 accounts for
$600. The revenue from spectators
netted $250 in the past. Fraternities
have paid to former committees $400
toward the decorations of their booths,
which used to be done in individual
colors.
Chairman Jeter also announced that
Dean Myra B. Jordan had informed
him that she would secure rooms for
the guests of unaffiliated students in
the Women's League houses.
H. A. Lichtig, '16M, presided at the
meeting and called on L. M. Bruch,
'16L, T. D. Weaver, '16E, C. E. Stryker,
'16E, J. B. Angell, '16, D. R. Ballentine,
'16, and W. C. Mullendore, '16L.
Only a few more tickets remain, and
these may be'secured beginning today,
by calling Bruch at 371.
UNION ANNOUNCES CHAPARONS
FOR DANCE TOMORROW NIGHT
Prof. John R. Brumm and Mrs.
Brumm, and Mr. and Mrs. Otto Hans
will act as chaperons at the member-
ship dance at the Union from 9:00 to
12:00 o'clock, tomorrow night. The
members of the committee in charge
are: Burton C. Budd, '15E, Elliot W.
Bisbee, '16, E. R. Borcherdt, 17, and
Cyril Talbot, '17.
Dances will be held on both Satur-
day nights during the examination
weeks, and tickets will go on sale at
50 cents each for members, at the club-
house counter, on the Thursdays pre-
ceding the parties.
U. of M. Property Worth $5,844,601.01
University property at the l niversi-
ty of Michigan amounts in . lue to
total of $5,844,601.01, accordin to the
inventory filed with the boar, of re-
gents at its meeting yesterd.:Y. The
detailed account values the buildings
at $3,428,523.33; the equipment at $1,-
934,421.79, and real estate at $481,-
655.89, according to the books on June
30, 1914.

work.
Prof. . S. Reeves,
science department, w
the executive board
school, in place of De
wh'o resigned.
A petition from the
C. A., asking for pert

of

er, that the Y. M. C. A. officials co
with the officials of the Michigan
ion, in order that the two orga:
tions might act together on this
ter.
A resolution was passed author
the executive committee and the l
ary committee to investigate thep
ent adequacy of the university b
ings.
A report was made, showing tha
the final accounts of the estate of
late Octavia W. Bates, '96L, the am
willed to the law library will .ag
gate $14,477.85. The fund for the
eral library totals $20,805.35.
. The receipt of various gifts was
knowledged by the regents, and sev
degrees were granted. The board
;ourned until February 10.

SELECT EDITOR AND B
MANAGER FOR 1915 1

Howard R. Marsh and Ferris H. Fib
to Have Charge of Summer
School Publication
Howard R. Marsh, '15, and Fer
H. Fitch, '15, were appointed to I
positions of managing editor and bi
ness manager of the 1915 Volverin
by the board in control of student pu
lications at their meeting yesterday
ternoon.
The men were chosen from a lar,
field of applicantscwho had previous
sent in their qualifications to
board. Marsh has had two years'
perience on the editorial staff of T
Michigan Daily, and as corresponde
to several state p,.pers. Fitch has b
a year's experience on the busine
staff of The Daily and worked on t
Wolverine last summer. Before a
noune;_(: Qv: appointments, the boa
in control looked up the eligibility
the successful candidates and found

Undergraduate. Contracts Diphtheria
Lee M. Thurston, '18, was sent to
the contagious ward of the university
hospital yesterday, when he was found
to be suffering from a serious case of
diphtheria.

I.
S -

50o
All Seats Reserved
On sale in
State Street Stores
about February 1st

J-H OP

CONCERT

50c
Seats maybe obtained
now by mailing check
to
D. R. Ballantine, Mgr.
Press Bldg.

SARAH CASWELL ANGELL HALL

Friday, February 5th

4-5 P.M.

w

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