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January 16, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-01-16

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r

YT MORNING
$2.00

I

he

Michigan

Daily

SUJBSCRIB3E
NOW
$2.040

XXV, No. 80.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 16, 1915.

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1DE DOCTRINE
'ORTERS LOSE
flirinative Team Wins From
[ Wile Negative Loses
o Northwestern at
E vaniston
'R TJUEJBLOOD WELL
1D WITH SHOWING MADE
Vins from Northwestern
Evening Standing o1
'ree Institutions

ichigan's debating teams divided
ors in the Central Debating league
est last night, winning the local
ate by a 2 to 1 decision, and losing
one held in Evanston by a unani-
s vote. Chicago won the debate
in Chicago, two of the three judg-
oting for Chicago, and so the three
ages are tied, each winning and
ng one contest. In each case the
mative side won the debate.
he contest held in University hall,
which Michigan argued for the
idonment of the Monroe Doctrine
, part of our foreign policy, was a
y contested debate, as was evi-
ced by .the vote, which was 2 to 1.
home team's rebuttal was excep-
ally strong, while the Chicago de-
rs failed to answer their argu-
ts conclusively,avoiding, the real
es of the question.
Three Distinct Issues
here were three distinct points:
t, the negative contended that the
rine is still one of protection,
e their opponents argued that it
been perverted to a policy of un-
ifiable aggression; second, the af-
ative asserted that the United
es can defend itself by interna-
al law without use of the Monroe
:rine; and lastly, the negative ar-
i that the document had remained
ianged from 1823 to the present
whereas the others stated that
olicy was aggressive, entailing
ecessary responsibilities.
ie contestants in the local affair
(Continued on page 4)
AGE1MIENT OF "MISLEADING
ADY" CANCELLE) BY lEAGUtE
ue to the rise of unfortunate cir-
stances, the engagement of "The
eading Lady' ,for Wednesday night
he Whitney theatre, has been can-
d. There is little possibility that
play, which was to have appeared
er the auspices of the Drama Lea-
of AnnaArbor, will be reengaged
later date.
>llowing the league's original in-
ion to guarantee the performance
ree plays in the city during next
ester, officers of that organization
substitute another drama of high
>re, at a later date in its place.
y are of the opinion that the delay
work out for the best, as it will
members of the Union a greater
th of time in which to sign the
ated membership pledges, to be
at the desk of the Union.

TODAY
Union Boat Club dance, at Union, 9:00
clock.
1imil Seidel speaks on "Socialism" at
Nowberry hall, 8:00 o'clock.
lFresh lit dance, harbour gymnasium,
2:30 o'clock.
Chess and Checker club meets at Un-
ion. 7:30 o'clock.
Election of Athletic officers, room 101
University hall, 10:00 to 1:30
--'cloc-.- -
TOMORROW
Bishop Charles 13. Williams speaks at
the Union on "The New Spirit it
Business," 3:00 o'clock.
Prof. J. C. Knowlton, speaks at Majes-
tic meeting, 6:30 4clock.
Cosmopolitan club meets in club
rooms, 4:00 o'clock.
Change Regents' Meeting to Thursday
Owing to* the fact that President
Harry B. Hutchins will be out of the
city next Friday, the regular meeting
of the regents has been changed from
that date to Thursday, Jan. 21.
MAY OFFER PLAY TO J-HOPPERS
Comedy Club Plans Presentation of
"Pomander Walk"
Wishing to add "PomanderIWalk"
to the list of Junior hop festivities,
members of the Comedy club are di-
recting every effort towards the per-
fection of the performance by that
time. Nothing definite, however, can
be predicted at present, as it is a ques-
tion as to whether all the necessary
arrangements can be completed before
the end of examinations.
Officers of the Drama league of Ann
Arbor will witness a performance of
the play today, in order to decide
whether or not they will place the
league's stamp of approval on the pro-
duction. If ':ts report is favorable, it
is thought that the townspeople will
more readily fall in line to witness the
To whip the cast into shape for the
play, rehearsals will be conducted ev-
ery night in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall. It is also planned to have the
cast go through its lines the Friday
and Saturday afternoons before ex-
aminations.
WILLIAM GIFFORD'S PAINTINGS
EXHIBI'TfED hERE NEXT MONDAY

I*

THE CANDIDATES
---

Interscholastic manager-(One
to be chosen.) Ward Peck,
'15L, F. G. Millard, '16L, Wil-
liam" J. Goodwin, '16L.
Assistant interscholastic mana-
gers-(Four to be chosen.)
Ray Mills, '16L, A. M. Bentley,
'16, Roger Thompson, '16, Har-
ry Kerr, '16, J. W. Thomas,'16,
Richard McKean, '16.
Footb'all manager-(One to be..
chosen.) Boyd Compton, '16,
Joseph Fee, '17L.
Assistant football managers-~
(Four to be chosen.) Lee Jos-
lyn, '17, Harold Easley, '16,
John Codd, '17, John Robbins,
'17E, Harry Nichols, '17, Earle
Pardee, ''f, Edward Shep-
herd, '17, Gerveys Grylls, '17.
Secretary-Phillip Middleditch,
'16E, William Lam oreaux,'16L.
Treasnrer-Joseph Darnall, '16-
'18M, T. Hawley Tapping,'16L.
-0-
Pertinent facts-
Time-10:00 o'clock to 1:30
o'clock today.
Place-Room 101 University
hall.
Coupon number 32 of athletic
book. required fgr voting.

*

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:
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PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TO VOTE TODAY FOR
ATHLETIC OFFIC-ERS
Heavy Balloting Expected as Result
of Large Number of Candidates
for Different
Offices
RULES AGAINST SOLICITING
APPARENTLY WELL OBSERVED
Race for Interscholastic Managership
!N arrows iDown to
Three Men
Athletic association officials expect
that one of the largest votes in the
history of the association will be cast
at the annual election to be held today,
owing to the large candidates for the
different offices,.
Although there has been a small
amount of campaigning by friends of
the candidates, there seems to have
been very little organized work and
pledging of votes for today's election.
The candidates themselves have ap-
parently kept well within the rules
laid down by' the association.
Yesterday's withdrawal of S. A. Op-
penheimer, '15E, from the candidacy
for interscholastic manager, leaves
but three men running for that posi-
tion.
Immediately after the close of the
election today, the annual meeting of
the athletic association will be held,
at which all members may be present.
The annual report of the treasurer-
will be given.
POSITIONS ON MICHIGAN RELAY
TEAM UNCERTAIN AT PRESENT
Coach Farrell Finds Hafrd Problem in
Picking Runners for Medley
Race with Pennsy

James Phelps, '1L, Samuel Witting,'1 5, Herbert Oppenheimer, 116L, Varsity
debating team, Michigan-Northwe stern debate last night in Evanston.

SEIDEL HAD START
IN LIFE AS CARVER

ARICNSOLOIST
SINGS, HERE' JANE3O

Socialist Leader Spent Many
Studying Trade as
Apprentice
WORKEI) ACTIVELY FOR I

Years I David

Bispham, "Greatest American
Baritone," to Appear at
High School

PAIRTY

Emil Seidel, who lectures in Newber-
ry hall tonight on "Socialism," had his
start as a carver and designer. He was
born of German parentage, in Schuyl-
kill county, Pa., on Dec. 13, 1864, but
his parents moved to Milwaukee five
years later. He graduated from, one
of the public schools there, and then
entered his trade as an apprentice.
When he was 22 years old, he went
to Berlin, and spent his time there
perfecting himself in his trade, and al-
so attending night school. In 1892 he
returned to Milwaukee, and then ad-'
ded pattern-making to his other trades.
In 1884 he helped organize the wood
carvers, and later became a member of

PROGRAM WILL BE IN ENGLISH
David B.ispham, termed by many fol-
lowers of music, "The Greatest Ameri-
can Baritone," will appear in Ann Ar-
bor on the evening of January 30, at
the high school auditorium under
the auspices of the university Y. W. C.
A. He will be assisted by Woodruff
Rogers, pianist.
Mr. Bispham has the reputation of
being the champion of English, for
singing operas to English-speaking
people, it being his policy to, carry
through his programs in his native
tongue. He will attempt to show the
beauty and possibilities of song in the
vernacular, not only with his singing,
but with short talks on the subject.

Paintings of William B. Gifford, in-
clu ding a masterly executed canvas
of the city of Jerusalem and several
other equally effective oil reproduc-
tions of Egyptian, Syrian, and conti-
nental European scenes, will be put on
exhibition to the public at 4:00 o'clock
Monday afternoon, in the residence of
Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Howard, on the cor-
ner of Church and Wahstenaw ave-
nues.
Mr. Gifford is a New York artist who
has studied extensively in Paris and
Florence, and, his portrayals of Holy
Land life have been favorably passed
upon by eastern critics.
Di. UIMEINGS REPORTS SMALL
POX SPrfEl AD NOW CONTROLLED
Dr. H. H. Cummings, of the univer-
sity health service staff, reported last
night that no more cases of small-pox
had developed, and that any possible
spread of the disease had been check-
ed.
Lecture on "Les liserables" T'uesday
"Les Miserables" is the subject of
a talk to be given in French by Prof.
Moritz Levi, of the French department,
at 5:00 o'clock, Tuesday afternoon, in
Tappan hall. -
Professor Levi gave two lectures in
French at Kalamazoo during the past
week, for the University extension
service. the titles of which were "Mae-
terlinck's Dramas," and "Parisian
Life."

FRESHMAN TRACK MEN TO MEET
First Year Candidates Will Be Called
Together Next Tuesday
Freshman track candidates will be
-alled together next Tuesday night, in.
the trophy room of the gym, for their
first meeting of the year.
Although no official summons has
been issued as yet, several of the first
year men have been working out regu-
larly in the gym for the past few
weeks. Coach Farrell of the varsity
squad, Captain Smith, "Hap"tHaff and
"Jimmy"' Craig will speak at the fresh-
man meeting.
The 1918 squad, from present indi-
cations, will be unusually strong in
the dashes, as several sprinters of
more than ordinary promise have put
in an appearance. Scofield, one* of the
members of the freshman relay team,
which walked away with the inter-class
race last fall at the Pennsylvania foot-
ball game, has been running against
"Hal" Smith and O'Brien, and, with a
one yard handicap, has been forcing
the two Varsity men to extend them-
selves to the utmost.'
Several promising milers have turn-
ed up, and a couple of likely looking
440 men have put in an appearance.
RIUY LOPEZ POPULAR OPENING
IN HARVARD CHESS TOURNEY
Ruy Lopez has established its popu-
larity as an opening in chess tourna-
ments once more, this time in the Har-
vard-Michigan correspondence match
that is at present being carried on.
Of the five games, three have adopted
the Ray Lopez moves, one of these
being the double Ruy Lopez. In all
three games Harvard is playing the
white side.
Michigan's two offensive games are
of a more conservative type, the one
being a Vienna game, and the other
early changed from what promised to
be a Queen's gambit to the French de-
fense. In none of the five games has
any advantage been secured by either
side.
The moves will be discusse'd at the
regular meeting of the Chess and
Checker club at the Union at 7:30
o'clock tonight.
Bill Would Abolish Ann Arbor Saloons
All liquor dealers and saloon-
keepers in Ann Arbor will .be put out
of business if a bill introduced in the
state legislature yesterday becomes a
law. The bill, which was introduced
by Representative Straight, would pro-
hibit the issuing of all liquor licenses.
in cities and towns where there are
universities, colleges or normal
schools.I

the Milwaukee Association of Pattern
Makers, to which he still belongs. Concerts given by Mr. Bispham are
He was early an active worker in said to be characterized by an intense
Socialism. In 1892 his vote was one of dramatic atmosphere, as he is a poet,
the two Socialist votes of his precinct. actor and orator, as well as a soloist.
In 1904 he was elected an alderman to The program will be of an unconven-
the city council, and served two terms. tional nature, being composed of songs,
In 1909 he was elected an alderman- stories and illuminating talks.
at-large, and in the next year he won Tickets for the concert will go on
'his race for the mayoralty. When he sale Monday at 75 cents. .They may
ran for re-election two years later, he be obtained at the university Y.M.C.A.
was defeated by the combination of and Y. W. C. A., Schaeberle's music
the Democratic and the Republican store and the University Music House.
parties, but secured 3,000 more votes -
than when lie was elected. In 1914 he SOCALLISTS MAY REVIVE LOCAL
was again beaten, but it is probable 1IAt.NCH OF INTERCOLLEGIATE
that he will be a nominee in 1916. -
Seidel will be introduced tonight by Michigan may again be represented
Esther Shaw, grad., formerly of the by a branch of the Intercollegiate so-
rhetoric department of Vassar Col- ciety, if the plans of a number of so-
lege. cialists on the campus materialize. Ar-
rangements have been made to have
Boat Club Dance Tickets Half Sold a number of prominent socialists of
Tickets for the Boat Club dance, to the country give lectures in Ann Ar-
replace the regular Union membership boi.
dance, at the Union tonight, were Two years ago the organization se-
about half sold at the clubhouse coun- cured a number of lecturers to speak
ter last night. in Ann Arbor, before more than 1,500
Leroy J. Scanlon, '16L, Kenneth persons. The organizations suddenly
Westerman, '14, C. T. Bushnell, '15, collapsed when a number of the most
and Harry W. Kerr, '16, will furnish active workers withdrew. Last year
quartet music at intervals between an attempt was made to revive the so-
several of the dances. ciety, but it failed.

Just who will represent Michigan at
Buffalo on February 5, against the
University of Pennsylvania, in the
medley relay race, is a big problem+
Coach Farrell stated last night that
although the four fastest men in col-
lege in the respective events would be
taken along, as yet he hadn't the
slightest idea as to who they would be.
The medley affair is four laps, the
first runner going 220 yards, the sec-
ond a quarter of a mile, the third a
half, and the last man a full mile.
Captain Smith appears to be the log-
ical selection for the first distance,
as long as there is but one sprinter
required, but 'O'Brien, last year's
freshman crack, has been showing the
captain the way down the floor on sev-
eral occasions during the past week,
and may possibly reverse the dope
and land the place. 'Smith, however,
is doped out to come through before
the final selection is made.
Whoever lands the position will
have to run against Donald Lippin-
cott. Lippincott, it will be remember-
ed, finished second to Ralph Craig in
the Olympic games in Sweden, in
both dashes, but Coach Farrell stated
that .he wasn't fearing this Olympic
man as much as he was another.
Smith's excellent performance at Har-
vard in the 220 in the eastern inter-
collegiates speaks for itself.
In the quarter, however, an entirely
different proposition is faced. Penn-
sylvania boasts of a world beater in
Meredith. He won this event in the
eastern intercoilegiates last year, and
holds the world's record for the half
mile, besides.
Murphy was the half-miler on last
year's squad, but several other prom-
ising 880 men have appeared, promi-
nent among whom is Carver. Then
again there is the possibility of switch-
ing Murphy to the quarter, if Burby
doesn't show enough speed.
Several candidates appear for the
mile, among them being Ufer, Carroll,
Lynch and Donnelly. Ufer will be
given a trial at both the mile and the
half, so that the situation is about as
complicated as one could wish.

4

EMTL SEIDEL

i'raraaa.r uxa.s.ra.t j

4

II

I .. y

Admission

E

IL

SEIDEL

SOCIALIST EX-MAYOR OF MILWAUKEE WILL TALK ON

8:00 P. M.

TONIGHT

lc.

"So C

I

A L

I

S

M "

-AT -

Newberry Hall

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