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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1915 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

w
.d

I.

_!

U

anuary Clearing
.SALE...
Double amount of Free Piano Certificates with each purchase.
25 % on Mackinaws
25 % " Rainco'ts & Balmacaans
10% " all winterSuitingsTrousings
and Overcoatings.
- DRESS SUITS TO RENT
J. K. MALCOLM
604 cast Liberty Street. M5leolm Block

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHERS
Don't Overlook
MY "SHOW U" SPECIAL
8 x 10 Enlargements until Jan. 25
Only 20c. Sepia 25c.
NOT MORE THAN 3 TO ONE PERSON
LYNDON, 719 N. Vnlv'rslty Ave.

I

We still have a nice
assortment of stiff hats which we are
closing out, some quarter off, some one
third off, some half price.

bmft
...

A'

For Twelve Years
The Sign of Satisfaction

0

Always the New' Styles: First

9 E BERT Y ST.
TENNIS AND GYMNASIUM SHOES

TNEY
TRE :

iday Night Only
January 18,

picked for the All-American soccer
team.
Columbia's Glee club furnished the
music at an entertainment given by
the United States at Ellis Island last
Saturday.
Members of the Girls' Glee club of{
Ohio State university will give "A Tur-
kish Scene in the Fortress of Rust-
schuk" on Friday.
-o-
Students of Cornell University have
donated $2,500 for the Belgian Relief
Fund.
-0-

A. H. WOODS, Presents
The World's Greatest Laughing Success
P a
AND'
Porimtt orume
AN UP-TO-DATE GARMENT IN THREE PIECES-
Made by Our Special Designer from
Material in the Famous
Saturday Eve. Post Stories
By MONTAGUZ GLASS
Trimmed with a Thousand Laughs and
Guaranteed to Fit All Sixes an A ges
Direct from its Remarkable Run
of Two Years at the George M.
Cohan Theatre, New York.
PRICES
MAIN FLOO0R
ENTIRE LOWER FLOOR, 592 Seats - - $1.50
BALCONY
FIRST 8 ROWS, 236 Seats - - 1.00
LAST 5 ROWS, 181 Seats - - .75c
GALLERY---- - - - - -.50C

LAW RIEW FIRST
iN WESTERN FIELD
Michigan's Legal Publication Among
Pioneers; Recognizes Good
Scholarship
,NE OF 11 UNIVERSITY PAPERS
Michigan's Law Review made 4ts
first appearance in June, 1902. There
were .several similar publications
naintained at other colleges at that
time, but none in the middle west,
which gave the field to the new publi-
cation. The purpose of the founders
is stated in the first number, which is
-to "give expression to the legal schol-
arship of the university, and to serve
the profession and public by timely
discussions of legal problems, and
calling attention to the most important
developments in the field of jurisprud-
ence."
There was another purpose involv-
ed, which was to give students of high
scholarship recognition for their
ability and an opportunity to serve
on a magazine. The Michigan Law
Review is directly under the control
of the faculty, but the active work is
done mostly by students who compose
sthe board of editorial assistants. The
junior class of the law department
by informal ballot selects those of its
members who are considered best fit-
ted for the positions on the staff, and
'from these names 20 are selected by
the facultyrtoafill the positions during
their senior year.
At the beginning, the magazine turn-
ed to the members of the law classes
for its support, but in time the alumni
came to recognize its value, and the
subscription list gradually enlarged
until at the present ime it is sent to
every continent in the world except
Africa.
' There are 11 law magazines publish-
ed at universities or colleges, seven of
them are edited in the east: Yale, Har-
vard, Columbia, Virginia, Pennsylvan-
ia, Dickinson, and Georgetown. In the
west there-are three, published at Cal-
ifornia, Northwestern (named the Illi-
nois Law Review) and Michigan. One
is found in the Philippines. The pur-
pose of these reviews is practically the
same, and the Michigan publication
ranks among the best.
The policy of the magazine was so
well outlined at the start that it has
been unnecessary to alter it or its form
from that time. Then, as now, the
inagazie is divided into four depart-
ments. One is devoted to the leading
articles on important and interesting
legal subjects. This is followed by
notes and comment upon current top-
ics and significant occurrences in the
legal world. Abstracts and digests of
the most important legal cases form
another department, as does that of
reviews and comment on legal litera-
ture. All articles, including the book
reviews, are signed by the author.
With the exception of October, the
.Michigan Law Review is issued on the
first of every month during the acad-
emic year. Prof. F. R. Mechem was
the first faculty editor, and at present
it is issued under the supervision of
Prof. Evans Holbrook. The magazine
is in no sense meant for pecuniary
profit for any person connected with
ht. All profits are intended for the
improvement of the publication and
for the welfare of the law depart-
ment.

Although the students and the fac-
ulty editor do the active work, the
other members of the faculty frequent-
ly write articles for its column. Con-
tributions are not limited to the fac-
ulty members of this college, for those
of other colleges and universities are
contributors, and many persons engag-
ed in public affairs have lent their aid
to one or the other of its departments.
Ex-Convict to Address Detroit Alumni
Frank Goewey Jones, the author,
who was released from the Ionia re-
formatory at Christmas time, will ad-
dress the meeting of the Detroit alum-
ni at the Edelweiss cafe today. Jones
is a regular contributor to several
monthly and weekly magazines, and
earned his parole through his liter-
ary efforts. He will talk on "A Mil-

BROADWAY AND JOHN R.
DETROIT
-where the U. of M. spirit
is manifest and "M" men are
taken care of. '.- Go to The
Edelweiss for your luncheon
when in Detroit, Soc. Also for
your Dinner or after-the-
theatre Supper. And we make
a specialty of U. of M. Ban-
quets. Dancing from 6 to S:3o
and 10 to 12:30. Delightful
music - orchestral and voice.
Cuisine unexcelled, and Ser-
vice the best. A royal wel-
come awaits "M" men at any
hour of the day or night at

I

CAMPUS BOOTERY Bostonian Footwear
308 South State Street ROYAL TAILORED CLOTHES

., A j
a

I

New Ice

- 31
JACOB MAtK, Manager
F. L. HALL, 514 E. Wlliam
Phone 2225
PRESSING . C'alea for
GosdDelivered

Roller

Kink

U

I

AT

WEINBERG'S

I

NO LOSS BY FIRE

ENTRANCE AT
7255O.th Avenue
Cornier Hill

11

4

I I

Seats on Sale friday Morning
MAIL ORDERS NOW
Only 68 of the 134 pledges to frater-
nities at the University of Chicago are
eligible to initiation, under the schol-
arship rules in force there.
-0-
Prof. A. D. Crowin, of Yale Sheffield
Scientific school, has been selected to
fill the place of Walter Camp, who re-
signed as the football representative
on the Yale athletic association.
-0--
Minnesota's cadet band may take a
trip to the Panama-Pacific exposition
immediately after the close of college.
Alumni of Princeton university re-
cently formed the Alumni Track as-
sociation, to stimulate interest in the

In order to eliminate petty cases of
dishonesty, the Council of Administra.-
tion at the University of Illinois, has
adopted the method of compelling the
guilty parties to acknowledge their
dishonesty before the class in which
the offense was committed. The ac-
knowledgment is to be written out and
accepted by the Committee on Disci-
pline before being given for the bene-
fit of the class.
-0--
Numerous fires in the residence dis-
trict of the University of Illinois, have
resulted in the erection of a great
many fire escapes, recently in accord-
ance with the state law.
-- -
Suit for $10,000 damages against the
trustees of the University of Illinois
is being instituted by Marie Seebach,
a former student, who was dropped
from the university in 1908, because of
unsatisfactory work. Miss Seebach
states that she was preparing to be-
come a teacher, and her opportunities
for employment were spoiled by the
action of the university officials.
-0-
Professor Guerlac, of the French de--
partment at Cornell, now a member of
the 89th regiment of the Frenich army,
on leave of absence, has brought some
interesting information from army
headquarters. In speaking of the uni-
versities on the continent, Professor
Guerlac said that most all the profes-
sors are at the front, and that, of the
students, only women and the men
that are physically unfit for the army
are in attendance.
The University of Lille is practically
closed, and at Nancy, conditions are
even worse. The secondary schools,
however, are carrying on their work
as usual, in spite of the fact that the
number of professors and instructors
is greatly diminished.
-.0-
Special fees at Columbia have been
abolished by the trustees. A new
scale is being put into effect, where-
by a blanket membership fee of $5.00

Wed, and sat. GUMIIIUMats. $1 Tsp
DETROIT
Comstock and Gest Present
"THE STORY OF THE ROSARY"
'DY' MENWORK
WiTH NEWS PAPERS.
Michigan Journal Turns Out Editors
ind Reporters for City
Press
GI A PUAT'IES HOLD BIG POSITIONS
Many former, Michigan Daily men
hold responsible positions as editors
and professors of journalism in dif-
ferent parts of the country, while oth-
ers, who have graduated more recent-
ly, are reporting.
More than 20 graduates of the last
eight years have already been heard
from in the newspaper profession. In
the list are Paul Greer, '11, assistant
exchange editor of the Kansas City
Star; Ralph Block, '11, reporter on
the same paper; Lowell Carr, '10,
state editor of the Detroit Free Press;
P. S. Mower, '07, managing editor of
The Daily in 1907-'08, now Paris cor-
respondent of the Chicago Daily News;
and Frank Kane, '09, head of the de-
partiment of journalism at the Uni-
versity of Washington.
Lee White, '10, who was managing
editor of The Daily in 1910-'11, and
editor of the Gargoyle during its first
two years, has recently accepted a
position as assistant professor of jour-
nalism in the University of Washing-
ton. He was formerly connected with
the Detroit News. Howard Devries,
'13, is now on the book review staff
of the Kansas City Star. Maurice
Toulme, '12-'14L, and Oscar Beckman,
'12, sit side by side at reporters' desks
in the Chicago Tribune offices. Toulme
was managing editor of The Daily last
year. Leo Burnett, '14, is reporting on
the Peoria Journal.
Frank Pennell, '12, managing editor
of The Daily in 1912-'13, has recently
been made editor of The Industrial
Review. Loren Robinson, '13, James
D'Evlin, '13, and Fenn Hossick, 'ex-'15,

are reporting on Detroit morning pa-
pers. W. K. Towers, '10-'12L, manag-
ing editor of The Daily in 1911-'12,
holds a position as associate editor of
the American Boy. Norman'Hill, '11,
is assistant sporting editor of the De-
troit Tribune. Hill was business man-
ager of The Daily in 1910-'11. J. S.
Yellen, '13, is assistant sporting editor
of the Buffalo Courier. William Dough-
erty, '13, is on the Washington Star.
Morton R. Hunter, '13E, is assistant
western editor of the Enginering Rec-
ord. Chase Osborn Jr., 'ex-'11, is edi-
tor of the Sault Ste. Marie Evening
News.
Several members of the present Dai-
ly staff have obtained positions during
summer vacation on metropolitan
newspaper staffs and magazines. A
new system of tryouts was establish-
ed by The Daily last fall Men who
are eligible to try out for the staff are
given examinations in concise, gram-
matical writing. If they pass the ex-
amination, they will be given regular
assignments.

11

Lgu

All Caps half price.

a,

i

Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
I wish to withdraw my name as a
candidate for the office of Treasurer
of the Athletic Association.
(Signed) Louis M. Bruch, '16L.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:--
I wish -to withdraw my nlame from
the list of candidates for assistant in-
terscholastic manager.
(Signed)
Donald McM. Sarbaugh, '17L.
UNDER FIRE, DENIES
WAR'S EXCITEMENT
(Continued from Page 1.)
"I have been on battlefields a num-
ber of times, and have not yet seen
anything so exciting as a game with
Case. Best regards to all the boys
you see. We certainly are proud of
Michigan for that Harvard game.
Your friend,
S. B. CONGER, '00."
DISSENSION STIRS
FRESH LIT CLASS
(Contined from Page 1.)
tertainers for the dance.
After the meeting, Pres. M. S. Colle-
ton and several members of the class
stated that the discussion was merely
an attempt "to arouse a little spirit in
the class."

Factory Hat Store
W. W. MANN, Prop.
118 E. Huron St. Near Allenel Hotel

BAND EVERY EVENING

Cooley Gets Surveying Camp Report
Prof. C. T. Johnston has just com-
pleted his report to Dean M. E. Cooley
on the work of Camp Davis, the sum-
mer surveying camp, during 1914. One
student has already been assigned to
a tent for next year. This is the earl-
iest beginning of actual work that has
yet occurred. Numerous applications
have been received for work of various
kinds at .the camp. These are being
bled and will be considered later on
when appointments will be made.
Boat Club Will Hold Dance Saturday
Chaperons for the dance to be given
by the Michigan Union Boat'Club, Sat-
urday night at the Union, are Prof.
Albert .E. White, and Mrs. White, and
Prof. William F. Verner, and Mrs. Ver-
ner. Elaborate surprises are being
prepared to feature the party. Tickets
will be on sale at noon today, at the
Union counter, and any member of the
Union or the Boat Club is eligible to
admission.

I-

UVII
Alpha Nu meets at 7:00 o'clock to-
night to nominate officers.

-0-c
aan baseball has begun at the
y of Pennsylvania, with the
of 24 candidates.

THE CON-PROOF KIND
AT
"THE ONLY
1Students'pp unpply.Store
111S. Univ. Ave. Opp. Eng. Arch. L. C. SCHLEEDE

giate is to be levied, in place of the various
New laboratory, gymnasium and library
toe.-- +~ .

11

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