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January 10, 1915 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1915-01-10

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The

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Daily

SUBSCRIBE
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1. XXV, No. 75.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. SUNDAY, JANUARY 10, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

. ___...

DEFINE RE I
Of SOCIAL SER ICE

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' .

Sophonisba Breckenridge Speaks
New Profession at Final
Women's Vocational
Session

of

TODAY

ABBY MARLATT DECLARES HOME E
ECONOMICS ESSENTIAL STUDY
Luncheon Brings Conferenco to Close;
Leaders Hope to Duplicate
Gathering
"Effective social service involves a
knowledge of the new social relation-
ships and the exercise of new forms of
hospitality and kindness, which may
be less glowing and satisfactory than
the old kinds, but which are now rec-
ognized as essential. Social service is
a definite and new kind of profession,
with a definite and new kind of tech-
nique." This was the thought devel-
oped in the talk on social service giv-
en by Sophonisba Breckenridge, dean
of the Chicago School of Civics and
Philanthropy, at the final session of
the Vocational conference yesterday
morning., Miss Breckenridge outlined
methods in the theory and practice of
social service pursued in the institu-
tion she represents.
Abby Marlatt, director of the home
economics department of the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin, said, in speaking on
the opportunities in this field open to
college women, that the economy of
the home is a thing fundamental in
the life of the nation, and a problem
that must be recognized and met in
the new ideal of collegiate education
for women. Miss Marlatt explained
the openings in the fields of business
administration, and the professions for
which the knowledge of home econom-
ics is essential.
Miss Maude Kelsey, national field
secretary of the Student Volunter band
of the Y. W. C. A., spoke on the new
scope of the Y. W. C. A. activity in the
work of social service, and outlined
the opportunities there. Catherine
Reighard, '15, president of the Wom-1
en's League, presided at this meeting.
She expressed hopes that other confer-
ences of a like nature will follow in'the
future.
Brief talks by Dr. Elsie S. Pratt,]
Mrs. Max Winkler, Dean John R. Effin-
ger, Judith Ginsburg, '15, Miss Mar-.
latt, and Miss Kelsey characterized the
luncheon, given yesterday morning for
speakers, guests and university wom-
en, which closed the conference.
The national civil service comnis-
sion, though unable to send a speaker,7
has forwarded literature on work in
that field, which will be placed, with
the material on. other vocations and
catalognus of vocational training in-
stitutions now in the possession-of the
titeague, in a permanent vocational li-1
brary in Barbour gymnasium.
COMEDY CLUB ATTEMPTS TO
FINISH PLAY BY J-HOP TIME
"Pomander Walk" Management Hopes
to Secure Scenery of Original
New York Production
"Pomander Walk" will go on the
boards during Junior hop week, if the
efforts of the management in this di-
rection are successful, according to
Pres. Louis K. Freidman, '15, of the
Comedy club. The club is making a
strenuous attempt to offset the late
start in rehearsals, caused by delay in
obtaning producing' rights from the
owners, but no decision as to the date
of production will be made. until there
are further developments.
Arrangements are practically com-
pleted with Sanger and Jordan Com-
pany, of New York, to lease, the scen-
ery used by the original "Pomander
Walk" compary. Costumes, duplicated
from the illustrations which appear in
the manuscript of the play, are being
specially made by a Detroit firm.

Dr. Ozora S. Davis, Majestic theater,
6:30 o'clock.
Dr. J. B. Pengelly, Michigan Union,
3:00 o'clock.
Rabbi Berkowitz, McMillan hall, 7:00
o'clock.
Dr. Ozora S. Davis meets Michigan
men, McMillan hall, 8:45 o'clock.
Dr. Ozora S. Davis, first Congregation-
al church, 10:30 o'clock.
Bishop Charles P. Anderson, St. An-
drew's Episcopal church at 10:30
o'clock.
Bishop C. P. Anderson on Baldwin lec-
ture course speaks on "Education,
and Responsibility, Episcopal
church, 7:30 o'clock.
Rev. Frank B. Bachelor at First Bap-
tist church speaks on "Christianity
and its Cross," 10:30 o'clock.
Rev. A. r. Stalker at the First M. E.
church speaks on "Conscript or Vol-
unteer," 10:30 o'clock.
Prof. Frederich S. Goodrich of Albion
college, stereopticon lecture on "Sun-
day Schools Around the World,"First
M. E. church, 7:30 o'clock.
Rev. Leonard A. Barrett, Presbyterian
church, 7:30 o'clock.
Cosmopolitan club meeting, club
rooms, 4:00 o'clock.

FLINT EPISCOPALIAN RECTOR
WILL SPEAK AT UNION TODAY
"The College Man's Opportunities," to
Be Topic of Informal
Address
Dr. J. B. Pengelly, rector of St.
Paul's Episcopal church of Flint, is
the speaker who will address the mem-
bers of the Union at 3:00 o'clock this
afternoon on "The College Man's Op-
portunities." In securing Dr. Pengel-
ly, the program committee considers
itself fortunate, inasmuch as he is
well known for his lecturing and is
much in demand for public addresses
all over the country. During the past
four years he has been on the Lyceum
Bureau.
Frank Wheeler, '15E, W. 0. Johnson,
'15E, and H. B. Forsythe, '17E, the
mandolin club trio, will render several
musical selections. R. M. Parsons,
grad., will sing a number of selections.
FIRE RAVAGES PART
OF DELTA CHI HOUSE

Conflagration Damages Third
of Fraternity Lodge to
Extent of $2,000

Floor

TOMORROW
Inter-class hockey meeting, trophy
room Waterman gymnasium, 5:00
o'clock.

NOMINEES CHOSEN
Eight Assistants, Four to Be Elected
Saturday, Nominated By
Committee
ELIMINATE TWO MEN NEXT YEAR
Nominations for the assistants to the
Varsity football manager were an-
nounced by the' committee yesterday.
From the list of tryouts, eight men
were named, four of 'whom will be
elected to the assistantships at the
athletic election' to be held next Satur-
day,
Lee Joslyn, '17, Harold Easley, '16,
John Codd, '17, John Robbins, '17E,
Harry Nichols, '17, Edward-Pardee, '17,
Edward Shepherd, '17, and Gerveys
Grylls, '17, are the men upon whom a
vote will be taken. The nominating
committee consisted of Director P. G.
Bartelme, Intramural Director Floyd
Rowe, Trainer Stephen Farrell, Cap-
tain James Raynsford of ,the football
team, and John Leonard, '16L, this
year's Varsity football manager.
The nominating of four men for the
assistantships this year, instead of
two, as formerly, is the result of. a
new plan of election adopted by the
athletic board of directors last month.
"From .the four men nominated, two
will be nominated for the Varsity man-
agership next year by the committee,
and one of them will be elected.
The election will be held from 10:00
o'clock to 1:30 o'clock Saturday, and
coupon number 32 from the athletic
books will be required before members
may ballot.
Sir Jagadis Bose to Visit Ann Arbor
Sir Jagadis Chunder Bose, plant
physiologist and professor in the Pres-
idency college of Calcutta, India, will
come to Ann Arbor February 1, as the
guest of Prof. F. C. Newcombe of the
botany department. According to Pro-
fessor Newcombe he may deliver a
lecture before the Cosmopolitan club.
Professor Bose and Mrs. Bose visited
Ann Arbor eight .years ago, when Dr.
Bose gave two talks before the faculty
and students.

MEMBERS TO SLEEP ELSEWHERE
Fire, probably started by a defective
chimney, broke out in the third floor
of the Delta Chi fraternity house, 733
South State street at 2:00 o'clock yes-
terday afternoon, causing a loss of
nearly $2,000.
Practically the whole third story was.
destroyed by the flames, and the great-
er part of the furnishings and decora-
tions on the second floor was seriously
damaged by water. The fire was dis-
covered by a pedestrian. The flames
had gained rapid headway, and it was
only through the swift work of the
students in the house at the time that
the whole building was saved from de-
struction.
As the dormitory of the house Is in
the section affected by the fire, men
living in the building were compelled
last night to take refuge in neighbor-
ing rooming houses and fraternities.
It is expected that the work on repair-
ing and remodeling the upper floors.
will begin early next week.
TO SELECT J-HOP ORCHESTRAS
Will Decide on Dances, Engraving, and
Taking of Flashlight
Choice of the J-Hop orchestras will
be made today when tie entire commit-
tee meets at the Union at 3:30 o'clock
this afternoon. The same number of
dances, and probably the same orches-
tras as were employed in former years,
will be retained.
The committee will also decide on
the engraving company which will do
the work on the programs. The privi-
lege of taking the flashlight of the
block "M" will be granted to one of
the local photographers, who has also
offered to provide souvenir booklets
for the guests.
INTER-CLASS HOCKEY MEN MEET
Chasers of Puck Will Discuss Plans
For Year Tomorrow
Announcement has been made of
an inter-class hockey meeting, which is
scheduled .to be held at 5:00 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon in the trophy room
of the Waterman gym. The hockey
men have been busy the past week
rounding into condition for the coming
inter-class struggles, over a dozen
working out yesterday, afternoon at
Weinberg's indoor rink.
All interested in the ice sport have
been urged to attend tomorrow's meet-
ing to learn of the plans for the com-
ing season.

CHICAGO SEMINARY PRESIDENT
SPEAKS AT MAJESTIC TONIGHT
Y. X. C. A. Inaugurates Series of After
Meetings Where Students May
Confer With Speakers
Dr: Ozora S. Davis, president of Chi-
cago' Theological seminary, will ad-
dress the "Y" Majestic meeting at 6:30
o'clock tonight.
President Davis has spoken in Ann
Arbor each year for the past five years.
He is one of the leading speakers at
the annual Y. M. C. A. conferences at
Lake Geneva, and is in tremendous
demand among colleges throughout the
middle west.
Beginning this evening, the Y. M. C.
A. will hold informal get-togethers
evenings after the church services.
At these meetings university men
who are interested may meet aid talk
with the famous men who come here to
speak at the Majestic meetings or at
the various churches. Tonight's meet-
ing will be held in McMillan hall.
WILLFRGTNEMI N
SATURDA 'S5 DEBATE
Michigan Seeks to Avenge 1914 Double
Defeat by Northwestern and
Chicago
TEAMS NEARLY READY FOR FRAY
Preparations for the Central League
debate, to be held next Saturday, are
rapidly being perfected. The squad is,
working daily under the supervision of
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood and Prof.
R. D. T. Hollister, in an effort to re-
trieve Michigan's two defeats of last
year, the first time that the university
has lost both contests.
One team, cons'isting of I. Becker,
'17L, H. Parker, '17L, P. Miller, '17L,
and J. Levin, '17L, as alternate, will
defend the affirmative against Chicago,
in Ann Arbor. The other team: H. D.I
Oppenheimer, '16L, J. A. Phelps, '16L,
S. J. Witting, '15, and the alternate, K.
M. Stevens, 16L, will go to Evanston,
Illinois, to represent the negative side1
of the question. The subject of the
debate i "1Resolved that the Monroe
Doctrine, as developed and applied by
the United States, should be abandoned<
as a part of our foreign policy."
Tickets will sell for 50 cents, al-
though members of the Oratorical as-1
sociation will be admitted on their sea-
son cards.-
RETAIN 15 MID-WEST DEBATERS1
Second Tryouts Saturday Morning to
Eliminate Three to Five Men
Yesterday's preliminary tryouts fort
the Mid-West league debating squad,
to meet Illinois and Wiscisin in
March, resulted in 15 of the 24 entrants1
being retained. The following is a
list of the men selected: W. M. Bruck-_
er, '16L, G. C. Clssen, '15, E. J. Engle,1
'15, R. R. Fellers, '15, B. F. Gates, '15,
N. H. Goldstick, '15L, W. I. Goodwin,c
'16L, H. M. Karr, grad., J. Levin, 17L,1
L. W. Lisle, '17L, A. J. Michelson, '16L,
S. J. Rosensteen, '15L, H. H. Spring-I
stun, '17, V. H. Sugar, '16, and M. Wein-
berger, '16L.
The second preliminary tryouts, to
be held Saturday morning, will elimi-
nate from three to five more candi-t
dates. t
Council Will Elect Officers Tuesday
Officers for the student council will1
be elected at a meeting in Mason hall
at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday night. Pres.

A. T. Ricketts, '15E, who was able to
walk yesterday for the first time since
his recent illness, expects to be able
to preside at the meeting.l
"Y" Forces Join in Fund Campaign1
Committeemen for the various Y. M.1
C. A. organizations operating in Anni
Arbor, have combined forces for thet
annual campaign for funds to meet
current expenses. .

1910 FOOTBALL SQUAD LOSES
SERVICES OF STAR HALFBACK
Martin Galt Leaves College. to Enter
Business at Portland, But
May Return
"Mart" Galt, star half on the 1913
Varsity, has left the university to enter
business in Portland, Oregon, and,
while there is a bare possibility of his
return in time to play next fall, it is
more than probable that the 1915
eleven will lose the services of the
veteran half. According to members
of his family, however, there is no pos-
sibility of his return to Michigan.
Galt's loss will be keenly .felt this
fall, for the Ann Arbor veteran was a
star of whom much wes expected in
1915. After starring on the 1913 Var-
sity, Galt was expected to be the main-
stay of the team last fall. Injuries
kept him out of every game, however,
but it was hoped that he would be in
shape to come back in the coming sea-
son.
CHICAGO BISHOP SPEAKS TODAY
Church Unity Leader to Give Leeture
on Baldwin Series
Bishop Charles P. Anderson, of Chi-
cago, will speak on the Baldwin lec-
ture series at the Episcopal church at
7:30 o'clock this evening, on "Educa-
tion and Responsibility."
Bishop Anderson has become a com-
manding figure in the religious world
because of his ardent work for church'
unity. He has lectured on this sub-
ject, both in America and in Europe.
He has won a great popularity in Chi-
cago because of his wide interest in
civic affairs.
'MEET TO HEIGHTEN
TRACK ENTHUSiASM
Past and Present Stars Will Address
Big Athletic Gathering
Tuesday '
REAL GRIND BEGIN, TOMORROW
With track work well under way,
a meeting has been planned for 7:15E
o'clock Tuesday night in the lecture
room of the physics building, for the
purpose of arousing more enthusiasm
among the men, and to bring o.ut a
larger number of candidates. Track
Manager W. B. Palmer will preside.
Realizing that the turnout.for track
work at' Michigan is far below what
it is proportionately in other schools,
the meeting has been arranged to
arouse, greater interest among those
now out and any new men that may
be present. Coach Farrell and Cap-
tain Smith will speak for those active-
ly engaged in track work. "Hap" Haff
has also been placed on the program
and "Chink" Bond, last year's inter-
collegiate 100-yard champion, has
promised to come out from Detroit to
address the gathering. Athletic Di-
rector Bartelme, and Intramural Di-
rector Rowe will also speak.f
Beginning Monday, the fastest times
and best records made in the different
events in the gym will be posted, so
that the men can see exactly where1
they stand. This plan was followed
out last year with considerable suc-
cess, and is to be repeated.
According to present plans, Coach7
Farrell has announced that the real

grind would commence tomorrow.
This past week has served as more or
less of a limbering up period, follow-1
ing the rest during the holidays.
Although the track schedule has not
been announced as yet, both indoora
and outdoor dates will be made pub-E
lic within a few days. More than 500
letters were mailed yesterday to track
men in college who are expected to
turn out at Tuesday's meeting. Captain1
Smith has stated however, that anyone I
interested will be welcome.1

NEW SCH OOL PLA1.

n

Prospectus for Educational Institute
to Be Drawn Up at Next Meeting
of Board, Going Thence
to Legislature
WILL DIVIDE BUILDING INTO
THREE GENERAL DEPARTMENTS
Project, Supported By State Board of
Education, Is Worthy One, Says
Professor Whitney
Final plans for Michigan's new ed-
ucational training school will be drawn
up at the next meeting of the board of
regents, January 21, and a petition for
the necessary funds will immediately
afterwards be submitted to the state
legislature.
The school, as planned by the edu-
cational department, will include a
high school and an elementary train,
ing school, as well as a modern. edu-
cational department.
In the high school section, will be
included two session rooms;' 2 recita-
tion rooms; 15 practice rooms, for the
educational department; four laborato-
ries, physics, chemistry, biology, wi'th
conservatory, and physiography; a rest
room for girls and one for teachers;
a manual training outfit for wood
work; a drawing room; a domestic
science room outfit, including a kitch-
en, serving room, laundry and sewing
room; a department for commercial
courses; an auditorium to seat be-
tween 500 and 600; two gymnasiums,
with locker rooms and baths; and one
high school labrary.
The elementary section will include
the principals' office for both the ele-
mentary and high schools, six grade
rooms to seat approximnately 40 pupils
each, one kindergarten room, one sub-
normal room, an open air room for
dramatics for the children and an of-
fice for the medical inspector.
The education department proper, it
is proposed, shall have four lecture
rooms, one of which shall hold 160
students; two laboratories for work in
educational psychology, with shop at-'
tached; a library for the educational
department; two museums, one for
(Continued on page 6.) .
COMMITTEE TO HANDLE FUNDS
Tickets for Belgian Relief Concert Go
on Sale Tomorrow
To handle the distribution of the
funds from the Belgian Relief concert,
to be held Thursday night in Hill audi-
torium, the Ann Arbor Civic associa-
tion has appointed a committee, of
which George Millen is chairman. The
rest of the committee was selected
from the faculty and students.
Students, to sell tickets, 'will be se-
lected by the Union and the Y. M. C. A.
in a few days. Tickets, which sell for
25 cents, will also be on sale tomotrow-
at the Wahr bookstores, the Union and
the Y. M. C. A.
The program will begin at 8:00
o'clock ,and will continue for about an
hour and a half. It will consist if the
lighter and more popular classics.
63 RIFLE CLUB MEN PRACTICE
FOR INTERCOLLEGIATE MEETS
From a total membership of 80 in the
Michigan Rifle club, 63 turned out yes-
terday afternoon at the Ann Arbor ar-
mory for the informal shoot that was
held to get a line on material for the
team, which will compete in the inter-
collegiate matches.
A 10 man team will shoot in the
regular matches, the five highest scor-
es being counted in computing the,
team total. From those who have
made the best showing to date a squad
of from 15 to 18 will be picked, and

from this squad two teams will be
formed, a first and second, which will
shoot against each other.

REGENTS TO JUDGE

. . ,1'

"One of the Ablest Speakers of the Middle West."
President OZORA DAVIS
Of Chicago Theological Seminary

Majestic
Tonight

6:30

-I1

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