100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 09, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAALY

rI

I'

anuary Cle aring
Double amount of Pree Piano Certificates with each purchase.

I I

IMPORTANTNOTICE Since there is to be
IMPOTAN NUI~a noHarvard Game
next Fall - FREE, One Round Trip and Two One
Way tickets to Philadelphia in 1915. To the Student holding cash reg-
ister receipts totalling the largest amount on the Saturday preceding the
Pennsy Game next Fall, I will give free transportation to Philadelphia and
return. To the two next highest I will give transportation one way.
Get busy now. Get your friends to save their C. R. Receipts.
...LYNDON.#

Did You Bring Back
That Panama Hat?
If so leave it and have us Bleach and Block
it for Spring
THE CAP AND HAT SALE IS STILL ON

i

25o
25%
10

on Mackiaws
" Raincolts & Balmacaans
t all winterSuitings,Trousings
and Oyercoatings.

I

I

NJ

DRESS SUITS TO RENT
K.4 MALCOLmM
6o4 ast Liberty Street. # Malcolm Block

J

For Twelve Years
The Sign of Satisfaction

0

Always the New Styles* First

9 E L RTYST.
TENNIS AND GYMNASIUM SHOES

Cgoibmwomwasm

s .
.. ..
...®.

.-

He Loved Her,
Ho! Ho! Ho!
"Oh Mary Gray, .I rue the day
I first set eyes upon you;
For Mary Gray, since .that same day,
I'm dreaming that I won you.
"At night I sleep not, Mary Gray,
My brain with you is teeming;
I cannot even eat by day,
II1ut sit, of you a-dreaming .
"My work lies idle, Mary Gray,
Since you my heart inspired ;
And I received just yesterday,
A pink slip saying 'Fired!
"But job and sleep and appetite,'
For them I snap a finger,.
If, Mary Gray, just once to-day,
I see your sweet smile linger."

COTILLION TO BE INTRODUCED
IN J-HOP PROGRAM THIS YEARt
Juniors' Function Will Differ Only
Slightly From Iances Held
in Pat
As a special feature, a cotillion,
probably the first held at Michigan,
will be introduced at the J-Hop, ae-
cording to an announcement made by
R. C. Jeter, '16E, general chairman.
The Huntinghouse decorating com-
pany, of Chicago, to whom the contract
has been awarded, will furnish its own
cotillion leader, who also has led cotil-
lions at Chicago, Wisconsin and sev-
eral other universities in this section.
Through the efforts of the commit-
tee, a promise has been elicited from
the local taxicab owners, that they will
not raise prices, and the old price of
$2.00 per couple for the trip to and
from the affair, will be maintained.
The 4ze of the booths will be in-
creased so as to accommodate at least
12 persons. This number had been
provided for by the decorators even
before they knew that the manage-
ment wished booths. As a result, the
decorations for individual booths will
fit in with the general scheme. Per-
mission has been secured from the uni-
versity authorities to increase the size
of the booths to whatever extent will
be found necessary for the proper ac-
commodation of the guests.
It was said last night that the hop
would differ, at least superficially, on-
ly slightly from the hops of former
years.
There will be a meeting of the hon
committee Sunday, and on Monday
tickets will be put on sale.
0 lROUGH HOUSE" TACTICS COSTLY
Students at Illinois Break Over 500
Yards of Glass Monthly
"Rough house" tactics, employed by
the students of the University of Illi-
nois in the class rooms, are costing
the state authorities a large sum of
money each month, according to the
Daily Illini. It is claimed that over
500 yards of window glass are broken
every month, and that but few of the
windows broken are paid for by those
who break them.
The Illini laments the fact that so
few of the students who break the
windows are honest enough to report
and pay for the damage. The stdents
have been appealed to "to quit acting
like English suffragists and desist,"
and are urged to turn their surplus
energies into more profitable channels.
As the university uses window glass
of double strength, and of the best
quality, its monthly glass bills are
considerable. A closer watch will be
kept on the glass expenditures - from
now on.
A. G. BRYANT, PEACE ADVOCATE,
GiVEN BANQUET YESTERDAY
A. G. Bryant, organizing director of
the World's Peace Foundation,talked at
a banquet given in his honor last ev-
ening in Newberry hall, on the Euro-
pean war and its underlying causes.
Mr. Bryant brought out the various
phases of the war, as seen through the
eyes of a peace advocate. He was in-
troduced by President Harry B. Hutch-
ins. Regent J. E. Beal was present at
the banquet.
Spends Vacation Installing System
Prof. Joseph A. Bursley, of the engi-
neering department, is at present
spending his leave of absence from the
university, helping to install a system
of scientific management in the plant
of the Eaton, Crane and Pike company
of Pittsfield, Mass., a large concern of
paper box manufacturers.

.Professor Bursley will return to the
university in time for the opening of
college next fall. He intends to in-
troduce a course in scientific manage-
menu.
fen of Northwest to Organize Tuesday
All the men from Washington, Ore-
gon and Idaho are invited to meet at
the Union at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday
night, to organize a club of the men
from that section. The club will be
founded with a similar purpose to the
Dixie club, with the object of promot-
ing the interests of Michigan in the
Northwest.
Emil Seidel Will Speak on Socialism
Emil Seidel, ex-mayor of Milwaukee,
has been secured to speak on "Social-
ism" at Newberry hall on Jan. 16.

Mats. A Week'
Wed. fR of.I10
Fri. Sat.JatI.C4th
DETROIT
Che
Passing Show
f 1914
F. L. HALL, 514 E. William
Phone 2225
N Goods Called For
PR ESSING .and evere
NO LOSS BY FIRE

Tae

BROADWAY AND JOHN R.
DETROIT
__where the U. of M. spirit
is manifest and "M" men are
taken care of. ..- Go to The
Edelweiss for your luncheon
#when in Detroit, Soc. Also for
your Dinner or after-the-
theatre Supper. And we make
a specialty of U. of M. Ban-
quets. Dancing from 6 to 8:30
and i to 12:30. Delightful
music --orchestral and voice.
Cuisine unexcelled, and Ser-
vice the best. A royal wel-
come awaits "M" men at any
hour of the day of night at

I.

ew ice

I

RollI

,

Factory. Hat Store
W. W. MANN, Prop.
118 E. Huron St. Near Allenel Hotel

Some 1-4 off Others 1-3 off Others 1-2 off
AVAIL YOURSELF OF THE OPPORTUNITY
Fine Assortment of up-to-date Hats still left

AT

WEINBERG'S

ENTRANCE AT

ui/il
Y
d
i
JACOB MACK, Manager

725 S. 5th Avenue
Corner Hill

CAPS 1/2 OFF

CAMPUS DOOTERY Bostonian Footwear
30 South State Street ROYAL TAILORED CLOTHES

I

BAND EVERY EVENING

.d

- mmwm

Michigan Daily 20 Years Ago

ward J. Twiss, '96L, committed
de Sunday morning, being at the
it is thought, in a fit of despond-
He left a note addressed to his
er, in which he stated that he was
d of living." Ilie also mentioned
ung lady's name in the note, but
s not thought that disappointment
love affair caused his death.
x- X
ring the vacation, the changes be-
in the main hall have been nearly
leted. In the north side of the
there will be a ticket office, but
the front stairways that formerly
o University hall have been rey
d, and the space has been walled
A stairway will be built from the
el to the ante room of University
ed Emerson Brooks, the poet ha-
st of California, will give read-
and recitations from his own
is, tomorrow evening, at the fourth
rtainment in the Students' Lec-
association course. Mr. Brooks
s highly recommended by the
s of both the east and the west.
-_x-
mbers of the Graduate club will
at 7:30 o'clock at the home of
Israel Hall, 43 Washtenaw ave-
Dr. Prescott will give an address
ome chemical laboratories which
isited in Germany.
esident Harper of Chicago uni-
ty, in an address to the trustees
students of the university, made
ttement in which he placed his
p of approval on college athletics.'
ry Braly Thompson, '93, and Ed-
Igwmm Tn Re 'Q2.'9 wEre marriedl

last Wednesday at Grand Rapids.
F. E. Brimblecom, the "missing"
senior class president, is at home in
Illinois recovering from a severe ill-
nes. He will return to college next
semester.
. --x-
Tickets are now on sale for the Glee
and Banjo clubs' 'benefit concert for
the athletic association, in University
Hall, next Saturday evening. They
may be obtained from any member of
the clubs, or from any member of the
athletic association. This year's Glee
and Banjo clubs were pronounced by
those who heard them in Detroit the
best that ever appeared there. They
have just returned from their annual
holiday trip, which has been an unus-
ually successful and enjoyable one.
They ga-ve concerts in the following
cities: Muskegon, Grand Rapids, Sag-
inaw, and Flint.'
--x-
Adelphi literary society will hold its
preliminary debate tomorrow evening
in University Hall. The question se-
lected is "Resolved, That the United
States Goverpment Should Control the
Nicaragua Canal." The contestants
ar Irwin Vilcox, Hans, Stivers, and
F. W. Newton.
Prof. Henry C. Adams has received
a request from Japan, for permission
to publish a translation of his work on
"Public Debts" in that country. This
will be done with the expectation that
it will aid in directing the course of
Japan's financial policy in the war she
is now carrying on with China,

Depict Alumnus in Buffalo Newspaper
In a recent issue of the Buffalo
News, Jack Yellen, '13, is depicted by
a cartoonist. in the various things
which he is doing. Yellen is president
of the Jewish Community athletic as-
sociation, is a short story writer, has
written several song hits, is a profi-
cient baseball player, and in addition
is one of the best basketball players
in the city. Yellen worked two years
on the Daily staff while at the univer-
sity.
FIRST SHOPS NOW
MADE INTO HOUSE
(Continued from page 1)
methods of scientific shop .manage-
ment. There is a great fire hazard,
as well as a risk of personal injury
to the students, owing to the crowd-
ing, and, as from time to time it be-
comes necessary to install new ma-
chines, the old ones must be re-ar-
ranged and crowded together.
To-day the construction, equipment
and management of shops has become
a well defined branch of engineering,
and, as the demand of public opinion
becomes more and more, felt, it will
soon be necessary to build new struc-
tures for housing the engineering
shops.
The present engineering shops are
not limited in their work to merely
teaching manual training or engineer-
ing practice, but are used by all the
departments on the campus, for such
work as building and repairing the in-
struments that may be found in the
observatory, marine laboratory, de-
partments of physiology and psychol-
ogy, and, in fact, some of the special
instruments of extreme precision have
been built in the engineering shops.
In the shops can be found types of
all the latest improved shop machin-
ery, including a ten thousand dollar,
flat turret lathe of the automatic type.
It would well repay those students
who are not afforded an opportunity
of working in the shops, to visit them
some Saturday morning when all are
running in full swing, and see the
type and variety of things produced.

MATINEE Daily at 2:30
Two Shows Nightly-7:30 and 9:00

W itnoe Teyro Saturday-Sunday
,Januar, 9 and 10
The First and only Authentic,
OTIOIN PICTURES
(Withi Lecture) OF THE
E U ROP E AN WA R
Taken By Edwin F. Wiegle, Staff Photographer of the Chicago Tribune
The Tribune Gives Half of It's Profits to the
DEL GIVM RIED C 11O1S S FVND
These Sensational Scenes Depict Vividly
The Burning of Antwerp. The Battle of Alost, The Destruction of Termonde
The Battle of Malines. The Battle of Aerschot. The Flooding of Lierre

President Lowell, of Harvard, is in
hearty accord with the aims of the
motor ambulance corps, now connec-
ted with the American hospital in
Paris, and has expressed the hope
that some of the younger graduates of
the university will heed the call for
volunteers just issued in France.
-o-
Coach Roy Thomas, of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania baseball team,
is not optimistic over the prospects
of a good pitching staff this year, al-
though 16 battery candidates have re-
ported to him for indoor practice.
Sayre, the only dependable hurler
last year, has graduated, leaving the
squad without any one to take his
place. Coach Thomas says that he
will scour the university for a de-
pendable man to fill the position.
Baseball candidates are greatly
handicapped at the university because
there is no indoor baseball cage.

Boston is the place likely to be chosen
for the erection of such a structure,
it consent of the faculty can be ob-
tained.
-0-
Dramatic clubs representing the
University of Illinois, Northwestern
University, the University of Chicago
and -the University of Wisconsin, have
organized a new national collegiate
dramatic fraternity, "The Associated
University Players," by name.
Play Second Round in Bridge Tourney
Contestants in the Union Bridge
tournament played the second round
at the Union last night. The score at
the close of play was 5,920, W. A.
Franklin, '16, and H. L. Buchanan,
'17E; 4,726, R. S. Collins, '16, and R.
Oberteufer, '16A; 4,528, A. C. Rowlay,
'16E, and M. B. Woodruff, '17.
Several more contests will be play-
ed during the year, in the tourney, and
prizes will be given to the highest
point winners. Anyone may enter
with the opportunity of making up for
the two rounds already played. Eugene
R. McCall, '16L, who has charge of the
contests, will furnish any desired in-
formation to those wishing to enter.

I

PRICES: Adults, 25c.
Children 1 c.-all seats

Dartmouth
leges to feel

-o--
is the latest of
the need of a;

the col-
stadium.

_ womomj

THE STORE OF POPULARITY
Everything a Student Needs

Students' Supply Store
CALL US UP AND WE DELIVER THE GOODS
141 S. Univ. Ave. Opp. Eng. Arch. PHONE i16

11

50-R

" w" .r ...:. nom. _.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan