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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



IN

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Our Removal Sale Now Going on and no Mercy Will be Shown the Prices on Our Full Line of Seasonable

Suits

Overcoats

Hats,

Underwear

We must vacate soon and our stock must be disposed of at Slaughter Sale Prices. This neccessitates
cutting our Prices on some merchandise to less than manufacturer's cast.

Men's Suits and Overcoats Divided into 2 Lots at and 1/3 Off

LOT 1, 1-3 OFF

Suits and Overcoats
Suits and Overcoats
Suits and Overcoats
Suits and Overcoats
Suits and Overcoats
Suits and Overcoats
Suits and Overcoats
Suits and Overcoats

...................$20.00
.... ... . .. $18.67
.........................$....... 16.67
...........$14.67
.......... $13.34
.... . $12.00
............. .... . $10.00
............................ ......$ 8.00

NOTHING RESERVED
BLUES AND BLACKS
AT ONE-FOURTH OFF 4
You Can't Beat This Offer Anywhere
in Town.

LOT 2,1-2 OFF
$28 Suits and Overcoats ......... ... ..........$14.00
$25 Suits and Overcoats.....................................$12.50
$22 Suits and Overcoats ... ......................$11.00
$20 Suits and Overcoats......... ...........$10.00
$18 Suits and Overcoats .... ..............................$ 9.00
$15 Suits and Overcoats............. ...................$ 7.50

ROUSER SALE
0 Per Cent Off
ers...............$4.0
rs ...............$4.80
rs ...............$4.00
rs...........32

YOUNG MEN'S SUITS
LOT 2
$12 to $15
Now $5.00

SHIRTS
$2.00 Shirts.................$1.60
$1.50 Shirts ... ...........$1.20
$1.00 Shirts......... .. ...$ .80

YOUNG MEN'S SUITS
LOT I
$7.50 to $10
Now $3.50

UNDERWEAR
Union Suits apd Two Piece

sers
sers

20.

On Flannel Shirts, Caps, Neckties, Sweaters, Suit Cases, Bags, Pajamas, Night Robes, Silk Lined Cloves,
Hen-vy Woves and Mittens.

$1.00,
$1.50,
$2.00,
.$2.50,
$3.00,
$4.00,
$5.00,

now
now
now
now
now
now,
now,

.... ... ... ... ...$ .o
.. . ............ . .20
.. . . . . . . . . .$1.60
.. ....$2.00
.$2.40
..$3.20
......$4.00

................
.................
.................

,_

EN LOT OF UNDE WEAR
ONE-HALF OFF

I

BATH ROBES
At ONE-FOURTH OFF

I

MACKINAWS
At ONE-FOURTH OFF

I

RAIN COATS
At ONE-FOURTIhl OFF

a .. i

MS &CO.

121123S. ain street

not exceed $100.
-o-
gymnastics have been
entrance of three new
race for the competi-'
gymnastics for the com-'
'thwestern, Iowa and
the teams in the race.

'le to

the corner stone
of Wellesley Col-
troyed by fire last
es found a Bible
d there since the

--
s College has been forced
. two of its minor sports,
the low financial condition
letic association. The swim-
a was discontinued for this
d from the fact that there
itinual lack of water in the
ck of interest manifested
am, lead the authorities to
recognition from the fencing
n as an'authorized sport.
-0-
ig in two special sleeping
Cornell musical clubs took
t trip during the past vaca-
has ever been arranged for
ght concerts were given in
t cities of the middle west,
ces, teas and smokers were
by the a1umni. The conclud-
rt of the trip was given on
at the Waldorf-Astoria hotel
ork city.
ty of Illinois track men will
of the best dirt tracks in the
e upon the completion of
new gymnasium. This will
rith the annual difficulty ex-
by the men in changing to
ork in the spring. The new
allows athletes to practice
i a hundred yard straight-
,ternity houses were damag-
or frost at the Ohio Statei
during the Christmas holi-
Delta Upsilons suffered the
rely, their house catching
ausing over $800 damage.
three suffered from burst-
pipes, but the damage in

Constr'uction of a $100;000 dental
building will be started at once at' the
University of Iowa, as the result of
the grant of the necessary sum of
money to the college by the state
board.
-0--
At the University of Pennsylvania,
16 battery candidates have reported to
the coach of the basebal team, who
called them together for their first3
workout recently. The men are great-
ly handicaped by the absence of an
indoor baseball cage.
---
Indoor track at Syracuse is arous-
ing much interest on the campus, as
is shown by the fact that 33 men are
practicing regularly on, the indoor
floor. The squad shows especially
good form in getting away from the
starts and sprinting short distances.
-0-
After many heated discussions, the
junior class of the University of In,
diana has decided to abandon the cus-
tom of publishing a junior year book.
The objections raised were that the
book entailed too heavy an expense
on the class, and that it would detract
from the junior prom dance for this
reason.
-0-
Flirting by the freshman women at
the University of Pennsylvania is
strictly under a ban, the. sophomore
women imposing a three cent fine on
any violation of the rule.
-0
Princeton's University faculty are in
favor of the establishment of a st _.
dent military organization, which
would be entirely voluntary. The agi-
tation for such a plan was started by
some undergraduates, who brought
the matter before the authorities.
Receives Copy of French Yellow Paper
Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary department, recently received from
the librarian of the French. national.
library a copy of the French Yellow
Paper. This is a copy in French of
the originals of-the diplomatic corres-
pondence of the government in con-
nection with the recent war.

YI.CA TO START
SERVICECAMPAIGN
'irst Team of Five Workers (4oes to
Orion for Week End of
Religious Survey
MEET WITH HIGH SCHOOL BOYS
Work on the University Y. M. C. A.
extension service starts this afternoon,
when the first team of five workers
goes to Orion for a week end religious
survey. Other trips will be made each
week until examination time, and af-
ter that surveys will probably be
scheduled, taking up the remaining
week ends of the school year.
The men making the Orion trip are:
N. E. Pinney, '16, Philip C. Lovejoy,
'16, Charles P. Barton, '15E, Norman
C. Bender, '17, and Frank Olmstead.
The Y. M. C. A. teams make a survey
of the religious life of the young peo-
ple in the village they visit, then pre-
sent the results at a union meeting of
the various churches held on Sunday
evening. The men hold meeting with
boys of high school age, and try to
present to them practical ideals of
Christian manhood. Where possible,
they. try to cooperate with the county
or local Y. M. C. A.
A new feature this year will be made
at St. Johns, where the survey will
be made in connection with the county
boys' conference.
This extension work is financed 'by
the people of the towns visited,
through their Y. M. C. A. organizations
or churches. The students receive
nothing beyond their expenses.
Generally the smaller cities and vil-
lages of the state have been visited,
but this year larger cities such as
Ionia, Adrian and Coldwater have been
scheduled.
Library receives Maxim Gorki's Works
Nearly a complete set of Maxim
Gorki's works in modern Russian lit-
erature have been received by the gen-
eral library. Among other books,
which have been received recently by
the library, are nine volumes of Polish
.literature and history which were pur-
chased at the 'equest of the Polish
club, and four volumes of, "A History
of the County of Surrey" in the Vic-
toria History of the Counties of Eng-
land Series.

Mr. Frederick M. Gaige, assistant in
the museum, has just been published
by the university. The title of the pa-
per is, "Results of the Mershon Ex-
pedition to the Charity Islands, Lake
Huron."
The collection upon which this paper
is based was made on Charity Island
during September, 1910, during the
Mershon expedition. This expedition
was sent out from the museum of zool-
ogy, and was supported by Hon. W. B.
Mershon, of Saginaw, Mich. The work
was done .under the general direction
of Dr. Alexander G. Ruthven, director
of the 'museum.
a -,A
PERU, A LAND OF CONTRASTS
By Millicent Todd (985 T63).
Again our attention is drawn to
South American shores. This time it
is by Mrs. Todd, in her recent book on
Peru, a very interesting account of
that land and its people. The sub-
title, "A Land of Contrasts," aptly des-
cribes the work, for therein Peru is.
depicted as a land where the paradox
is the rule, rather than the exception.
In this anomalistic depiction, how-
ever, important historic facts are not
overlooked. The history of the Peru-
vian Indians is told. Beginning with
the primitive days when they were
worshipers of many deities whose tem-
pies they lined with precious metals,
it continues through the Spanish vice-
regal days when they were robbed of
their gods and their gold, and con-
cludes with a picture of their present-
day thinly civilized state. It is an
historic story made fascinating by the
mystery and charm with which the
author clothes the land, where the
mountains, the desert and the jungle
each adds its iuota of interest.
D .B.
Remember the "ALL-GIRL-SHOW"
at the Majestic begins Monday mati-
nee at 3:00 o'clock, January 11th. 72-7

UNIVERSITY PUBLISHES PAPER
ON TRIP TO CHARITY ISLANDS
Paper number five of "Occasional
Papers of the Museum of Zoology," by

Good Honest
TAILORING
and promt service
AT REASONABLE PRICES
ALBERT GANSLE

About two thousand people attend-
ed the faculty concert given yesterday
afternoon in Hill auditorium. The
work of the string quartet in inter-
preting the difficult Schumann, "Quar-
tet in A minor," was extremely praise-
worthy. The parts were well blended,
properly subservient one to another,
and the playing marked by precision
and solidity.
Owing to Mr. Harrison's indisposi-
tion, Mr. Westerman, lyric tenor, ap-
peared acceptably in his stead. He
sang the following miscellaneous
songs, "Siciliano" from "Cavaleria
Rusticana" (Mascagni); "La Donna e
mobile" from "Rigoletto; "Als die Alte
Mutter" (Dvorak), and "For 'You
Alone" (Alyward).
The program concluded with a group
of piano contributions, played by Mr.
Harrison. Although compositions on
the smaller scale, they were played
with an excellent mixture of vigor
and imagination, and were well re-
ceived.
According to a telegram received a
few days ago from his New York man-
agers, Ferruccio Busoni, the eminent
Italian pianist, has recovered from his
gllness, and is now on his way to this
country, where he will open his Amer-
ican tour in Boston on January 22 and
23, as soloist with the Boston Syin-
phony orchestra.
Although no date has been arranged
by the school of music authorities for
his Ann Arbor appearance, a definite
date, probably about February 1, will
be announced within a few days.
Busoni is one of the world's most
distinguished pianists. He was orig-
inally scheduled to appear in Ann Ar-
bor in November, but illness and the
outbreak of the European war neces-
sitated a re-arrangement of his entire
American tour.
Under the leadership of Dr. Ernst
Kunwald, the Cincinnati orchestra of
nearly 100 musicians will make its
initial appearance in Ann Arbor on
February 17. The organization has at-

108 E Washington S.

tained a prominent position among the
few leading American orchestras, and
its work is classed with the best.
The school of music is planning a
substitute for the concert to have been
given here in March by Lee Slezak,
who was forced to give up his Ameri-
can tour in order to join the Austrian
army.
Preliminary arrangements are. well
under way for the twenty-second May
festival. As usual, the festival will
consist of six concerts, four evening
concerts beginning Wednesday, May
19, with a symphony concert Friday
afternoon and an organ recital Satur-
day afternoon. The complete Chicago
Symphony orchestra, under the leader-
ship of Frederick Stock, will take part
in all of the concerts, with the excep-
tion of the organ recital, while the
Choral Union, augmented by a supple-
mentary chorus made up of Ann Arbor
school children, under the direction
of Professor Stanley, will offer three
choral works. This year the children
instead of appearing as a separate
chorus will sing at both concerts in
combination with the adult chorus.
The school of music hopes to be able
to make a complete announcement of
the entire list of soloists in a very
short time.
MONEY -RAISINO SALE-All Cloth-
ing, Balmacaans, Overcoats, Suits,
Men's Furnishing Goods and Hats at
Sacrifice Prices.
ALLEN'S GOOD CLOTHES STORE,
SMain Street,

Second Floor

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