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January 07, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-01-07

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1

Michigan

Daily

Sul

NOW
$2.00

-j

72. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CEN'

i

TEAM
START

.-_
- _ _

i

Sets February 14 as
r Opening of
r Practice

OP AND
PROBLEM

F ER RA

Hurlers With All-Fresh
Promise Strong
ching Staff
-en, Varsity baseball,
Ann Arbor yesterday
announce that indoor
ce would start Febru-
tely after the semester

TODAY
Women's Vocational conference, Sarah
Caswell Angell hall, 4:05 o'clock.
Fresh engineer smoker, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Camp Davis Smoker, Michigan Union,
8:00 o'clock.
Peace Contest, University Hall, 8:00;
o'clock.
Dean Vaughan Expects Passage of Bill
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the med-
ical department and president of the
state board of health, expressed him-
self yesterday as confident of the pas-
sage of the bill to be introduced in the
coming session of the legislature,
looking to the safeguarding of the
state public health. The bill will pro-
vide for the division of the state into
30 sanitary districts over each of
which a health officer will be placed.

ie earliest opening of the
ison in several years, but
ne pastimers hope to again
interollegiate title this
Lundgren will be on hand
his squad in shape.
eason's championship . ag-
pitchers Baribeau and
catchers Baer and Hip-
top Baker and first base-
d are the only veterans
, Ferguson and Davidson,
iurlers, McNamara, Flynn
of the All-Fresh; and Sod-
teserves, give Lundgren a
f slab artists, despite the
two veterans.
ld, Sisler, Labadie, Sheehy
remains intact;while Cap-
en at second and Hughitt
have another year of ball.
the All-Fresh, should fill
)rner at first in excellent
was the heaviest hitter on

BOGARDUS ENGINVERIING CAMP
NOW CONSISTS OF 2.200 ACRES
Purchase of More Land Gives Univer-
sity Control of Creek; to Develop
Own Powr
With the addition of the 576 acres of
land, the purchase of which was au-
thorized by the board of regents at
their last meeting, the university now
owns about 2,200 acres on Douglas
and Burt lakes, all of which is used
by the surveying and biological camps.
The land gust bought consists of two
tracts, one of which gives the univer-
sity complete control of Carp creek,
a stream running into Burt lake. It is
planned to install on this creek, within
the next few years, a plant which will
"supply the camps with light and pow-
er. The other section of land is clear,
and will be used for railroad surveys.
It has been so utilized in past years,
although the university did not own it.
The university's property now has
a frontage of one mile on Burt lake,
and about three miles on Douglas lake.
It is planned to expand _ hereafter
around Douglas lake, so that contol of
one section of the lake may be secured.
ENOLMENT GOES
TO SEVENTH PLACE'
Relative Ranking in Size of American
Universities Shows Fall Vron
Fourth Position
SUMMER SCHOOL LESSENS TOTAL
Michigan has dropped from fourth
to seventh place in the number of stu-
dents enrolled, according to figures
recently compiled and published in
Science for December 25, showing the3
relative ranking in size of American'
universities. The statistics, dating1
November 1, and including the sum-
mer session enrollment, after making

.ardest place for
Baker was the
field last season.
tt will be shifted
1 playing third
>n and Robinson,
other candidates

veterans are absent.
use, of the All-Fresh
Zeserves, are the only
; just now for the po-
e of by Hippler and

AT CLUB PLANS FOR
AND NEW CLUB HOUSE
Director Rowe States That
tment Wil Arrange
Class Contests

Plans for a crew, a new club house
nd race course on Argo pond, and the
eorganization of the managership of
1e Michigan Union Boat club were
arried through at a meeting of the
.ub at the Michigan Union last night.'
Grover Farnsworth of Detroit, for
free years coxswain of the Syracuse
ght, and grandson of a former re-"
ent of the university was at the
eeting representing the Detroit Boat
lub. He is to secure the cooperation
the Detroit club, to oversee the rats-
ig of money among the 2,000 alumni
i and near Detroit for the project,
rid he promises to get two excellent
ght-oared shells. I;e declares the
urse of about two miles on Argo
:nd without exception the finest in
1e country.
Intramural Director Rowe is willing
take steps in arranging interclass
ontests to form the basis of a future
arsity crew, for which he thinks five
ears are needed. Class numerals
ould be distributed for winners in
ie interclass contests, and transpor-
tion would be furnished to and from
ie pond for contestants.
The Eastern Michigan Edison Com-
any has promised a building site and
,000 for a new clubhouse, and lum-
er concerns in Detroit are being soli-
ted to furnish the necessary lumber.
irector Rowe's plan was. carried for-
aving students construct the building
>metime this spring.
Henry S. Parsons, '15E, Commodore
the Club, resigned at the meeting.
b.e membership campaign is post-
-)ed because of re-arrangements now
Bing made in the managership.
ged Mother of Professor Lane Dies
Mrs. Clotilda Lane, of Hudson, Mich-
an, mother of Prof. Victor H. Lane,
the law department, died recently at
e age of 99 years at her home at

ANNOUNCE JUDGES
OF PEAC_CONTST
Orators Who Will Speak In University
Hall Tomorrow Evening Well
Prepared
ORATORICAL TICKETS TO ADMIT
Plans for the Peace Contest, to be
held at 8:00 o'clock tomorrow evening
in University Hall, were completed
with the announcement of the selec-
tion of the judges, who are: Regent
. E. Beal, Secretary Shirley W. Smith,
Prof. Robert Bunker, of the law de-
partment, Prof. J. L. Markley, of the
mathematics department, Prof. A. H.
Lloyd, of the philosophy department,
and Prof. E. H. Kraus, of the mineral-
ogy department. Albert G. Bryant, of
Boston, will be the presiding officer.
Following is a list of the team, the
order of their speaking and their sub-
jects: S. J. Skinner, '15, "The Evolu-
tion of Peace"; 'R. R. Fellers, '15,
"Armed Peace"; N.E. Pinney, '16, "The
American Conquest of Europe"; C. H.
Ross, '15, "Militarism and the Masses"
and A. P. Bogue, '16, "The Opportunity
of Public Settlement."
The postponement of the date from
December 22 to January 8 on account
of the change in the vacation date has
given the members of the team more
time to prepare for the presentation
of their orations. Some of the candi-
dates remained in Ann Arbor during
vacation to work on their orations,
which are all on some phase of peace
and the delivery of which will not ex-
ceed 16 minutes.
The winner of tomorrow's contest
will represent the university at the
state contest, which will be held, for
the first time in many years, in Ann
Arbor in March. The winner of the
state contest will go to the intercol-
legiate contest at Madison, Wisconsin,
and the representative chosen there
will go to the national contest at Lake
Mohonk, N. Y., in May.
Members of the Oratorical associa-
tion will be admitted to tomorrow's
contest on their season tickets. Gen-
eral admission is 25 cents.
LAW REVIEW TREATS ON WAR
FROM LAWYER'S STANDPOINT
Aspects of the war as seen from a
legal point of view are dealt with in
the opening articles of the Michigan
Law Review, for January, which has
just appeared. "International Law in
War," by Prof. Theodore Nemeyer of,
the University of Kiel. and translated
by Wendell Herbruck, '09L. is the first
of .the articles.
Prof. J. F. Reeves, of the political
science department, has contributedi
an article on. "The Neutralization of1
Belgium and The Doctrine of Kriegs-I
raisen," in which he -criticizes Profes-j
sor Niemeyer's view as expressed in
his article in Juristische Wechen-t
schrift. The attack is made from a
legal point of view and also from that
of a layman.
Among other articles are: "A Com-
parison 'of Some Methods of Concilia-
tion and Arbitration of Industrial Dis-
putes," by Prof. J. H. Brewster and,i
"Corporations and Express Trusts ast
Business Organizations," by Prof. H.
G. Wilgus.

One-two-and on through eighty-
six years, President-Emeritus James
Burrill Angell, Michigan's grand old
man has passed, and to the Daily re-
porter who interviewed him yesterday,
he was more cheerful and optimistic
than many men half his age might be
expected to be.
Sitting in the big easy chair in his
study, reading an original manuscript
on '"Chinese Art and Archaeology"
when the Daily,-reporter was ushered'
in, Dr. Angell smiled and slowly shook
his head when asked for a statement
on his eighty-sixth birthday. "Just tell
them I am enjoying good health and
am glad to see all the students back
again. There isn't much left in Ann
Arbor when all the university folks
are away."
When asked to comment on the ex-
isting European war situation, he
again smilingly shook his head, and
refused to make any predictions. How-
ever he stated that he had never be-
lieved that he would live long enough to
see civilization go back 300 years in

one week, as it has done during the
past year.
In the course of the interview, Dr.
Angell, in discussing old memories, be-
came reminiscent, and told of many
of the interesting and peculiar people
with whom he had come in contact.
His ancient reputation as the ringer
of the library chimes afforded him
considerable amusement, he said, and
he laughed long and heartily at many
of the old stories, that had bieen cir-,
culated about his prowess in various
lines of campus endeavor.
When urged once more to give to the
campus a signed statement on his
birthday, he very courteously declined,
but said, "You can make this state-
ment for me: As we get older, publici-
ty loses any attraction it may have ev-
er had for us, and all I can say is that
I look upon the future with unbound-
ed optimism, and despite the awful
calamity in which so many of the
world's greatest nations are engaged,
I feel that the rule of God must tri-
umph in the end."

Rank College'
1 Columbia
2 California
3 Chicago
4 Wisconsin
5 Pennsylvania
6 Harvard
7 Michigan
8 New York
9 Cornell
10 Illinois
11 Ohio State
12 Minnesota.
13 Northwestern
14 Syracuse
15 Missouri
16 Texas
17 Yale
18 Nebraska
19 Pittsburg
20 Iowa
21 Kansas
'22 Tulane
23 Cincinnati
24 Indiana
25 Stanford
26 Princeton
27 Western Reserve
28 Johns Hopkins
29 Washington
30 Virginia

En- Former
roll- Posi- In-
ment tion crease

due allowance for
are as follows:

ADMT RFLECLUB
TO'NATIONAL BODY:
Will Participate in Regular Schedule
With Nine Institutions; Get
Three Rifles
ARRANGE FOR MEETING TONIGHT'
During the vacation the Michigan
Rifle club was admitted to the Nation-
al Rifle association of the United Stat-
es and will take part in the following
indoor schedule with the nine other
teams in class "C":-
Jan. 28-University of Washington.
Feb. 4-University of Arizona.
Feb. 11-University of Kansas.
Feb. 18-Rhode Island State College.
Feb. 25-University of Nebraska.
March 4-Lehigh University.
March 11-Mississippi Agricultural
and Mechanical College.
March 18--University of Idaho.
March 25-Yale University.
Following the first day of practice'
yesterday afternoon for the tryouts0
for Michigan's rifle team, a meeting of
the club and all those interested in
shooting was arranged, Major A. C.
Pack of the Michigan National Guard
and Lieutenant C. E. Wilson being se-
cured to address the gathering, which
convenes in room 311, new engineer-
ing building, at 7:30 o'clock tonight.
Intramural Director Rowe, secretary
of the club, and Prof. F. R. Finch of
the engineering department will also
speak to the club. Director Rowe
will give his report of activities during
the vacation at this time.
Three rifles, Stevens regulation
(Continued on Page 4.)

MAKE UNION" PART
O UF DRAMA LEAGUE
All Members to Enjoy Privileges of
Association Hereafter; to
See Three Plays
PRODUCE WORK OF EX-STUDENT
As negotiations to make the Michi-
gan Union an affiliated club of the
Drama League of Ann Arbor were
completed yesterday afternoon, mem-
bers of the Union will enjoy the pri-
,vileges of associate members of the
league in the future. This means that
those students, who signify their in-
tention of witnessing one of the plays
to be brought to this city by the
league, will have the opportunity of
securing reservations on the second
day of the advanced seat sales.
"The Misleading Lady" will be pre-
sented on the evening of January 20,
at the Whitney theatre, the first of
the three plays to be given this year
under the auspices of the league. Paul
B. Dickey. ex-'08, is the co-author of
the play, having written it in connec-
Ition with Ch.arles Goddard. The pro-
duction, a comedy, has a strong plot
interest, and contains opportunities for
some good work by the principals.
"Yellow Jacket," the second drama
on the list, a novel interpretation of
,the Chinese stage, will be presented
during the first week in March. The
selection of the remaining play lies
between "Lady Windemere's Fan,"
with Margaret Anglin as the star, and
the appearance of Bertha Kalisch. This
last performance will be given later
(Continued on page 4)

double registrations,

11,294
8,180
7,131
6,696
6,505
6,411
6,319
6,142
5,939
5,664
4,943
4,484
4,072
3,193
3,385.
3,371
3,289
3,199
2,975
2,768
2,650'
2,441
2,190
2,163
1,893
1,641,
1,523
1,374
1,345
902

President-Emeritus Optimistic
Upon Reaching 86hBrda

1
2
3
6
5
7
4
9
8
10
11
12
13
14
16
17
15
18
23
20
19
21
24
22
25,
26
27
28
29
30

1,365
1,109
297
806
536
784
311'
634
327
405
832
552
195
68
250
2651
26
349J
1,069,
226
40
143
319
-108
137
42
153
63
120
17
from

SEEK TO REPYT
Women's Meeting, Starting Today, W
Attempt Supplying Answer
to Question of
Future
DEAN JORDAN WILL SUBSTITUT
FOR PRESIDENT ON PROGRA
Miss Bennett and Other Speakers Wi
Hold Personal Conferences
With Students
"After College What?"
That's the slogan to be worn by ux
versity women today at the openii
session of the Women's Vocation
conference, to be ushered in by De
Myra B. Jordan at 4:05 o'clock this
ternoon, in Sarah Caswell Angell ha
Prominent speakers have been dra
from all parts of the country to answ
this query, and their efforts will co:
tinue until Saturday noon, when t
conference will be brought to a clo
Helen Bennett, director of the C1
cago Collegiate bureau of occupatiox
will fire the first gun of the meetiz
with a talk on general vocations f<
women, especially in the field of Jou
nalism. The opportunities in voc
tional training at the university wi
be dealt with by Prof. David Frida
of the economics department, in t
last talk of the afternoon session.
Speakers of the conference 'wi
grant ,10 minute interviews on the
special1subjets to university o.
during the days of the sessions. R
quests will be placed in writing in ti
box, which will be hung for that pu
pose in the corridor of Barbour gyu
nasium today, or will be given to He
en Champion, '17, who is arrangir
the schedule. Miss Bennett and Flo
ence Jackson will consult on ti
choice of vocations, as well as fou:
nalism and social service, from 9:(
o'clock to 12:00 o'clock and from 3:
o'clock to 4:00 o'clock today.
Miss Jackson will give an inform
talk at a reception for coferent
speakers and out-of-town guests, to 1
held at 8:00 o'clock this evening,
the home of Dean Jordan. All unive
sity women have been invited.
Personal letters, expressing go
wishes and interest in the conferenc
have been received from many prop
nent persons in neighboring states, i
cluding Prof. James R. Angell a
Mrs. Angell, of the University of C
cago and Dean Louise Mathews, of t
University of Wisconsin. The prese
conference is being administered aloi
lines of similar conferences at the
.and other universities.
President Harry B. Hutchin's, w]
was to have opened the conferen
with a short talk, was called out
town last night, but will return in tir
to preside over and speak at tome
row's meeting to be held at 4:05 o'clo
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
PLAN TO REMODEL UNIVERSITY
HALL TO PERMIT THEATRICA
Pending action of the regents, pla:
for the remodeling of University HE
with a view to the accommodation
theatricals, are under consideration.
It is believed that no elaborate a
terations will figure in the chang
made. The organ will be removed ai
the rear wall continued across 9t(
space formerly occupied by it.
lighting system for the stage will 1

installed and it is likely that drop cu
tains will be purchased. The alter
tions are made to afford a suitab
place for the presentation of oratoric
association plays, Shakespearean rea
ings, and similar performances.
The seating capacity of the audits
rium may be considerably reduced
insure greater safety in case of fire.
HILDEGARDE HAGERMAN FIRST
WOMAN ON GARGOYLE BOAR
Hildegarde Hagerman, '15, has bee
appointed to the editorial board of ti
Gargoyle and is the first woman
receive such an appointment. Durin
her three years as student in the Un
versity of Wisconsin, Miss Hagerma
was a member of the Daily Cardina
staff.
Harold Fitzgerald, '17, and Ralp
Folz, '17, have also been appointed t
the editorial board of the humor ma-
azine. Joseph Kucera, '17, has bee
appointed artistic editor of the Get
goyle.

Apart from Michigan's drop

fourth to seventh place, other changes
of note are in the case of Yale, which
fell from 15th to 17th place, and in
the case of Pittsburg, which made tIle
greatest jump of all, coming from 23rd
place to 19th. Wisconsin advanced
from sixth place to fourth. Indiana
was the only one of the colleges men-
tioned that suffered a loss in enroll-
ment.
If the summer session enrollment
be omitted, Michigan ranks fourth,
with 5,522, following California with
5,614, Pennsylvania with 5,736 and
Columbia with 6,752. New York Uni-
versity, Harvard, Illinois and Cornell
follow Michigan in the order named
and are the only other universities
above the 5,000 mark., Last year Mich-
igan ranked third, preceding Califor-
nia.
In the number of gains in enroll-
ment figures for the year, including
the summer session, Michigan ranks
14th with 311. The list is as follows:
Columbia, 1,365; California, 1,109;
Pittsburg, 1,069; Ohio State, 832; Wis-
consin, 806; Harvard, 784; New York,
634; Minnesota, 552; Pennsylvania,
536; Illinois, 405; Nebraska, 349; Cor-
hell, 327; Cincinnati, 319; and Michi-
(Continued on Page 4.)

A

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