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December 16, 1914 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1914-12-16

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The

Michigan

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SUIISC1IBlE
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Vol. XXV, No. 68.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGA1N. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1914.

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1

MIMESTO PRODUCE
NOVEILVAUDEV1ILLE
Show Tonight in Hill Auditorium First
of Kind Ever Staged
By University
Students
SIX NEW FEATURE ACTS WILL
COMPRISE EVENING'S PROGRAM
Well Known Performers Seen in Other
Campus Productions Combine for
Big Entertainment
With the rising of the curtain at
8:00 o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium,,
on the Spotlight Vaudeville show, the
students will witness the first produc-
tion of the kind ever presented by
campus entertainers. Six varied, fea-
ture acts, handled by the best under-
graduate talent, will comprise the bill
to be offered. Every act has been pre-
pared especially for the show, which
bids fair to excel many productions of
the professional stage.
Tickets are free to Union members,
and others may secure admission cards
at 25 cents. A number of members'
have not yet called for their free. tick-
ets. Arrangements have been made
whereby they can be obtained at thej
desk any time today or tonight uponI
presentation of the membership card.9
Tickets may be purchased today at the
Union, Trubey's, Wahr's, Sheehan's,
University Music House and Tinker's.i
Any remaining pasteboards will bet
placed on sale at the box office in Hill1
auditorium at 7:30 o'clock. No seats
will be reserved, tickets admitting toa
any seat in the auditorium.
Chase Sikes, '16, and George Moritz,
'15, in their singing act will lead off
the program. Pantomime stunts will
also feature their act. Moritz will
take the woman's part. L. J. Scanlon,
'16L, whose nmusical skill is well
known, has brought together seven
n, , m muicians in a whirl-

TODAY
"Spotlight Vaudeville," Hill auditori-
um, 8:00 o'clock.
Barristers' dinner, Michigan Union,
6:00 o'clock.
Junior dent smoker, Michigan Union,
7:30 o'clock.
TOMORROW
Mr. Carl Marston, on "The Art of
Copy Reading," seminary room, West
hall, 9:00 o'clock.
Cercle Francais Soiree, Sarah Caswell
Angell hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Senior engineer "Spotlight" party,
Michigan Union, 8:30 o'clock.
Forestry moving-pictures, Arcade the-
ater, 2:30 o'clock.
Junior Law dance,' Granger's, 9:00
o'clock.
VETERANS APPEAR FOR WORKOUT
Track Squad Strengthened By Addition
of Ufer and Murphy
Clarence Ufer, the miler on last
year's track squad, reported to Coach
Farrell for work this week for the
first time this season. "Dutch" Murphy,
the 880-yard man on last year's squad,
is ali out, this being his second ap-
pearaice
The addition of these two men to the
track squad completes the list of vet-
erans from last season. Although both
Murphy and .Ufer failed to win an
"M" last season, they scored many
points for Michigan during the year,
and their return to the squad promises
to strengthen the team materially.
From present indications the 440-
yard dash promises to be the chief
worry of the coach in the track events.
The graduation of Phil Jansen, the
crack quarter miler on last year's ag-
gregation, leaves a big vacancy. John,
who showed considerable promise dur-
ing the early part of last season, but

JANUARY NUMBER OF STUDENT
TO BE PUT ON SALE S 1TURDAY
Articles By Ohio State Professors, and
By Italian Headliners In
Next Issue
Ohio State University and its profes-
sors will feature the January number
of the Cosmopolitan Student, which
will go on sale here Saturday. Prof.
H. R. Spence, head of the political sci-
ence department of Ohio State, has
contributed an article entitled "Kul-
ture and Culture," in which he points
out the influence of the various nation-
alities on the countries' environment.
Prof. E. C. Cogan and Prof. J. C.
Leighton will also have articles in the
January number.
"While the Cannons Thunder," by
Mario Marini, president of the associ-
ation of Cosmopolitan clubs in Italy,
throws much light on the Italian as-
pect of the war. H. O. Sandberg, as-
sistant editor of the Pan-American
Bulletin, has an article on, "A Pan-
American Opportunity," in which he
brings out the great opportunities for
the United States at the end of the
European war.
The Harvard number of the Student,
which was put on sale last Saturday,
has received the unstinted praise of
faculty and students. Editor Fred B.
Foulk, '13-'15L, has received commend-
atory letters from all parts of the
country. Demands for more copies
have been received from many of the
members of the faculty.
NEW BULLE[TIN TO
APPEAR TOMORROW
Journal, Prepared by Michigan Union,
Will Reach Every Student
and Graduate
MAY JOIN ALUMNI TO 1 NiVERSITY
Editor E. W. Haislip, '14L, of the

1lEALTII STATISTICS OF CAMP
AT DOU L AS LAKE GIVEN OUT
Report Prepared by Dr. Stouffer Gives
Complete Analysis of Water
and Sanitation
Complete statistics of the health and
sanitary conditions at the engineering
and biological camps at Douglas lake
last summer, are embodied in a state-
meat given out recently by Dr. C. B.
Stouffer of the university health ser-
vice, who had charge of the work at
the camp last summer.
Besides giving a list of the infec-
tions and diseases which were treated
during the summer, the report empha-
sizes the need of more staple and per-
lanent quarters for the mess, and the
lack of a kitchen house, in which to
pack ice, so that foods may be kept
in cold storage. At present there is
no suitable method for keeping foods
fresh, and this accounts for sickness
caused by eating foods which became
spoiled.
The waters used in the camp have
been test-ed, and all have been pro-
nounced fit for drinking purposes, ex-
cept the water from the lake, which is
not used unless boiled first.
The different details of sanitation
-were accomplished by a sanitary com-
mittee, composed of Dr. Stouffer and
several students, who were assigned
to work with him for a week at a
time. Certain rules of sanitation were
made, and strictly enforced through-
out the summer.
SEVEN MAKE TEAMS,
OF PEACE_1[TRYOUTS,
Five Wen and Two Alternates Chosen
to Speak i Finals of Contest
January 8

DELiGHTS

M A TERIAL

FACULTY

SOCIETIES PICK MEMBERS FOR
TEAMS TO TRY OUT FOR DEBATE
Try-outs for the team which will
take part in the Mid-west debate, were
held last night by Adelphi and Alpha
Nu societies. The following men were
chosen to places on the team: H. M.
Karr, grad, Roy R. Fellers, '15, George
W. Hulbert, '17, G. F. Furley, '16,
Amos F. Paley, '17, Victor H. Sugar,
'16, H. B. Teegarden, '17, B. F. Gates,
'15, E. J. Engle, '15, Jacob Levin, '15-
'17L, H. H. Springstun, '17, L. W.
Rabe, lit special.
Webster debating society will meet
tonight in its rooms in the law build-
ing to select its members of this team.
This is the first time that the faculty
of the oratorical department has tried
the new system of representatives in
which there are six men selected from
each of the four literary societies.
This gives an opportunity for more
men to take active part in the compe-
tition and also gives the try-outs the
advantage of direct faculty supervis-
ion. The team of 24 members will be
heard from time to time and gradu-
ally reduced to the required size of
six men.
VACATION BASKETBALL LEAGUE
PROPOSED FOR HOLIDAY WEEKS
To A rrange Inter-Department Sched-
ule if Enough Show
Interest
Provision for those unfortunates who
cannot get home for the Christmas
holidays are already being made byi
the intramural department, in the form
of a vacation bas.ketball league, to be
made up of teams entered from the dif-
ferent departments, which will play on
a percentage basis to determine the
holiday department championship. I
The first steps in the movement are
being taken by the placing of cards in
Doctor May's office at Waterman gym
and in the athletic association office,
on which cards, those interested In
vacation basketball may enroll by,
signing their name, class, address and"
telephone number. The cards will be
placed today and those Who anticipate9
being in Ann Arbor durlng vacation,
and who are interested in the port,
are requested to register in order thatt
an idea may be obtained as to howi
many will enter the league. In the1
event of there being less than fifty no ;
arrangements can be made.
If enough enthusiasts signify their
intention of taking part in the play
the details will be arranged. Up to
this time there have been no steps
taken in regard to this, except the
securing of Waterman gym, which will
be open from 10:00 o'clock to 12:00
o'clock every day. It has also been
arranged that collegiate and not Ama-
teur Athletic Union rules shall be
adopted to govern the play.
CHANGE IN MANAGEMEINT HALTS
BOAT CLUB MEMBERSHIP PLANS
Plans for the Michigan Union Boat
club membership campaign, slated to
start immediately after the holidays,
have. been blocked by rearrangements
now under way in the managership.
Activities, until the end of this week,
will be confined to publicity and dis-
tributing of circulars on resuscitation
of drowned persons.
A meeting of leaders of the club,
which will be held on the Tuesday or
Wednesday after the return of the stu-
dents from vacation, will determine
the leadership in the membership cam-
paign, and decide other policies. W.
Lee Watson, '17E, as chairman of the

resuscitation committee, is supervising
the distribution of 5,000 pamphlets on
saving of drowning persons, recently
received from the state authorities at
Lansing. Most of these will be handed
out at the Spotlight Vaudeville at Hill
auditorium tonight.
This committee is cooperating with
Dr. H. H. Cummings, the university
health service head, who is giving dem-
onstrations of proper methods of res-
cuing the drowned, before freshman
gym classes.

Give

Seniors First Choice of I
After Juniors Have Had
Opportunity

"Hyacinth," the skit written for the
show by Leon Cunningham, '16, has for
its feature, the adventures of a wo-
man impersonator. The feminine role
is played by W, L. DeLano, '17. Cun-
ningham and M. C. Wood, '17, handle
the other two parts. L. E. Hughes,,
16E and H. B. Bartholf, '16E, who
have gained an excellent reputation
for their ability to interpret the mod-
ern dances, will present the the fox
tyot, Pavlowa gavotte, and maxixe.
General chairman. L. K. Friedman,
'15, stated last night that he felt con-
fident the show would make a decided
hit with the audience, basing his opin-
ion to a large extent on the fact that
every act is new, and has never before
been presented in a campus entertain-'
ment.,
ILLINOIS CLUB, EN ROUTE TO
CHICAGO, WILL HOLD SMOKERS
Illinois club, leaving Ann Arbor in.
a special car, at 1:17 o'clock Friday,'
will while away the hours. of the jour-
ney to Chicago with a smoker. The
members are attempting to make the
affair a success and are arranging sev-
eral talks while en route. Light re-
freshments will be served.
linerview Soccer Men About Insignia
Coach Eugene McCall, '16L, and oth-
er members of the soccer team will,
according to the recommendation, of
the board of directors of the athletic
association, which received the report
of the soccer investigation committee
Monday afternoon, appear before the
board to represent the team, before
any action is taken by the board in
regard to the awarding of insignia.

-a

HOP CHAIRMANSH
Smith and MeMahon, Presidents, Di
Lots at Meeting of Senate
Council Committee
Yesterday
ERECT BOOTHS AT GYMNASIUM
TO RENT FOR NOMINAL CHAR

I

In spite of repeated flattering ad-
vances on the part of Ohio State Uni-
versity,. Dean W. B. Hinsdale of the
homeopathic department has given his
final decision to remain in Ann Arbor.
For some time the Ohio officials have
been trying to induce Dr. Hinsdale to
act as dean of the new college of hom-
eopathy in that institution, offering
him every advantage in the matter of
facilities and salary, but he has con-
sistently refused, believing that his
field of effort is in the University of
Michigan.-
DELAYED.MOTION PICTURES TO
BE DISPLAYED BY FORESTERS
Films for the motion pictures on mod-
ern logging, which wereto rhavebeen
displayed December 2, but were re-
tained at the Dtroit customs house,
have arrived and will be thrown on
the screen at the Arcade theater from
2:30 to 4:30 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon. Forestry club officialsahave
made arrangements 'whereby all for-
estry students will be admitted free.:
The pictures will also be displayed in
the evening as part of the regular Ar-
cade program.
)MYSTERY DISSOLVES INTO THIN
AIR AT SENIOR LITS' PARTY
After having discovered that the
Half Dollar Mystery was to be unrav-
eled in Barbour gymnasium, 120 sen-
ior lits gathered there to hold their
traditional pre-Christmas party. Em-
mett F. Connely, as Santa Claus, gave
toys to each of the seniors. Mr. and
Mrs. Lyman Bryson acted as chaper-
ones.

bulletin, which is issued in booklet
form, similar in size to all university
announcements, was provided for by,
the board of regents and is a depart-
ure in methods of keeping the alumni
in touch with the active life of the
university.
Enough copies of the booklet are
being printed to provide one for every
alumnus and undergraduate. Every
branch of campus activity that might
be of interest to alumni is given space.
It is hoped through this neav publica-
tion to cement more closely the bond
.between alumni and the university.
It is not definitely known just how
often the bulletin will be issued. Since
the distribution is free and extends to
all alumni, it is in no sense a competi-
tor of the Alumnus.
Alumni will receive their copies
through the mail, the bulletin having
the same status in the mail as other
publications of the university. Students
will receive their copies from recepta-
cles in the various buildings.
SOCIETY TO CONSIDER PLANS
FOR AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT
Prof. Filibert Roth, of the forestry
department, will speak before the
members of the Washtenaw county
horticultural society at 2:00 o'clock
Saturday in the city hall. At this time
plans for the establishment of a de-
partment of agriculture will be consid-
ered. Secretaries from the boards of'
commerce of 117 cities of this statei
will be present at "he meeting.
Junior Laws to Hold Dance Tomorrow
Junior laws will give a dance at
Granger's dancing academy at 9:00
o'clock tomorrow evening. Prof. R.1
W. Aigler and Mrs. Aigler will chap-
erone the party, while Harry Wood,
'16D, and Lyle Clift, '16L, will furnish
entertainment with a number of songs.

In the preliminaries for the Peace
Contest, held last week and this week,1
thore were seven men, two, as alter-l
nates, chosen to make up the team of
tryouts from which the Michigan rep-
resentative will be selected. The team
consists of the following men who will
speak in this order in the final try-
outs: S. J. Skinner, '15, R. R. Fellers,
'i, N. E. Pinney, '16, C. H. Ross, '15,
A. P. Bogue, lit special. The alternatesl
are: S. P. Hilado, grad., and F.'S. Sor-1
renson, grad.
The change in the date of vacation1
made it necessary to alter the date
for the final tryout, from December'
22 to January 8. This will give the
members of the team more time in
which to prepare for the presenta-
tion oftheir orations before the public,
in University Hall at that time. Some
exceptionally strong pieces are ex-
pected by the oratory faculty this year.
Prof. T. E. Trueblood of the oratory
department expressed himself last
night as well pleased with the material
which was given in the preliminary
contests. An unusual amount of in-
terest has been shown this year in
the Peace Contest, and some of the
candidates will remain in Ann Ar-
bor during vacation to work on their
orations.
The final preliminary will be held in
University hall January 8, and the win-
ner of the contest will represent the
-nlversity in the state contest, which
will be held in Ann Arbor in March.
I'he winner of the state contest will
go to the Intercollegiate contest at
Madison, Wisconsin, where the rep-
resentative of this district will be
chosen to go to either Mohonk,,N. Y., or
to San Francisco, Cal., to take part in
the national contest.
Members of the Oratorical associa-
tion will be admitted to the final try-v
out for this contest, in University Hall,
January 8, on their season tickets.
General admission is 25 cents.

Junior engineers will elect the gen-
eral chairman of the Junior hop, a
result of lots drawn by Don Smith,
,16E, and George McMahon, '16, when
they met with the senate council coi-
mittee on student affairs, yesterday f
ternoon. Other details of organizatioji
were also arranged and will be incor-
porated into a permanent constitution
by the hop committee, and ratified 'by
the senate council committee.
Junior lits and engineers will have
four men, junior laws two, and each o
the other junior classes one man on
the committee. These men will have
to be elected before Thursday, so as to
be able to attend the meeting of the
committee which will be held before
the beginning of the vacation. In cas-
es where it will be impossible to hold
class meetings, appointments by the
class presidents will be peimitted for
this year. Committeemen will be sub-
ject to the eligibility rules for non'
athletic activities.
The scheme of decorations will allow
for booths which will be rented for a
nominal fee, and which will hold not
more than four couples each. They
will be placed about the sides of the
gym, as the booths of former years
were placed.
As a compliment to the -enior ,
who were def'rived of a hop In thepr
junior year, they will he g:vn frIt
choice of tickets to the afar after
juniorshave had exclusive opportunity
to purchase tickets, and then thi tal e
will he thrown open to other clase,
Faculty men will have an opportuni,
to secure tickets at the same time tht
seniors will. Tickets will be no-
transferable, and will cost $5.00. At-
tendance will be limited, but .the exact
number will be fixed at some rater
time.
Junior lits will meet to elect commit-
teemen at 4:00 o'clock today,'in Tap-
pan hall. Junior engineers meet in
their regular assembly, 9:00 o'clock
tomorrow morning.
,k
TECHNIC TO HAVE HUII OR COLU.
Harold Schradzk, '15L, Author of New
Department of Magazi ne
In line with the new policy of the
Michigan Technic, Harold Schrdzkl,
'15L, has contributed to the DeCm-
ber number, which appears tomorrow,
a humor column, in which he del
upon some of the funny sidesa of nt
neering. The departen, whlc i,
called "Transitory Slants" 'will pr
ably be continued in future numba
of the magazine.' Edward Maguire, '1@,
has drawn a heading for the column,
Among the special artices in the
magazine are: "A Critical Review of
the Different Phases of the Evolution
and History of the Inernal Combus"
tion Engine," by Prof. A. F. GreneĀ°
"An Approximate Numerical Soluton
of Differential Equations in Two a
ables," by Prof. T. R. Running
"Inventive Genius and Commer
ism," by L. J. Watson.
Alumnus Writes About Field Artl1ery
Oliver J. Spaulding Jr., '95, captain
of the fourth field artillery, United
States army, has written a bock on the
subject "Notes on Field Artiliery."'This
is the second edition of the book, which
has been written primarily for the use
of infantry and cavalry officers, and for
college men who are interested in the
subject.

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