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October 04, 1914 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

r

A.

Foot-wear
,:;p A
I E

Amateur Photographers! Safety First!
Take your films to Lyndon's "Safety First" development system,
and get absolutely perfect results. We will not charge you one
cent if you can find a single defect in the developing we do for you
EASTMAN KODAKS AND FRESH SUPPLIES

HAND P RESSING
LADIES WORK A SPECIALTY
C. I. KIDD - - -Sophomore
1530-1 1112 S. Univ. Ave

LYNDON

- - 719 N. University Avenue

I

STAIUM TO HAVE
UNIQUE FEATURES

Freshman

-4

ed rubber sole
s type of shoe.
ther toe splice.

Concave Stands Will give
Same Opportunity to
All Parts of
Field

Everyone,
See

ORPIIEjUM Theatre
Ann Arbor's Parlor Picture Theatre
MON-TUES., OCT. 5-8
Hobart Bosworth presents
John Barleycorn' by Jack
London.
WED-THURS., OCT. 7.8
P. P. Craft presents 'East
Lynn.'
FRI-SAT., OCT. 9-10
J. L. Lasky presents Rob-
ert Edison in 'The Call of the
North.'

I ALSO
CANDIES
Sophomore

College Icackis Many Things
But the Best Is
the Lunches
AT' POP BANCROFT'S" 722 Monroe

I

CO., 115 S. Main Street
CHE....
hool of Music
eter. ANN ARBOR, MICH.
ano, voice, violin, organ, or
parately; or they may take
to graduation.

terary Department for Advanced work.'
n Rates Reasonable.
: in the study of music and de-
tion, call at the office, or address
ILES A. SINK, Secretary.

Junior
ALSO
bCARS
Senier

I

parties, socials and

and Low-

:e5.

118 5. Mal

NIA LITERARY. SOCIETY
OLDS FIRST MEETING TODAY

STRUCTURE WILL ACCOMMODATE
31ORE T HAN SOLDIER'S FIELDI
Cost of $5.O Per Seat Will Be Taes
Than at Yale, Harvard or
Chicago
When the new reinforced concrete
football stand is thrown open to the
public for occupancy at the Vander-
bilt game, October 10, the first unit of
the most perfectly designed concrete{
stadium in America will be finished.
Long before the plans for the com-
pleted structure were drawn, the
board in control of athletics made a
careful and comprehensive study of
the largest concrete stands and sta-
diums in the country. After eliminat-
ing the faults and adopting the good;
points of the models which they exam-
ined, the designers embodied several
original ideas, making the completed
work the last word in this type of
structure.
Almost the entire work is a product
of Michigan brains. The plans were.
drawn by Engineer Hal Weeks, '07E,
former Michigan quarterback, collabo-
rating with the faculty of the engi-
neering department. Weeks acted as
superintendent of construction, andl
George Moe, assistant athletic direc-
tor, as purchasing agent.
The present stand, which will form
one-third of the contemplated stadium,
will accommodate 13,000 people. A
second section will be built next year,
and the north stand will be erected in.
the year following. The seats of the
stand are so arranged that the line of
sight of a person of normal heighth
will have a clearance of four inches
above any person sitting in front of
him, regardless of the part of the field
to which the line of vision is directed.
This result was obtained by construct-
ing the first 11 rows with nine inch
risers, the second 11 with 10 inch ris-
ers, the third 11 with 11 inch risers,
the fourth 11 with 12 inch risers, and
the last 11 with 13 inch risers. This
arrangement gives the stand a grace-
ful concave appearance, which has
caused the amusing rumor that the
massive structure is sinking in the
middle.
The stand is constructed with a
safety factor of five, which will more
than compensate for the vibrations set
up by the stamping feet of the spec-
tators. All seats are selected of
straight grained wood, free from knots
and blemishes. These seats have been
given one coat of linseed oil on the
undersurface and two coats of this oil
and a coat of varnish on the upper
side.
In a table of figures prepared by the
athletic association, the stadiums of
Yale, Harvard, Chicago and Michigan
are compared. The Yale structure is
a 950 foot ellipse, composed of.57 rows
of seats and will accommodate 61,500
people. Its final cost was $550,000.
Harvard's . stadium is a 576 foot

nts Will Discuss Topics
Native History and
Literature

STENNIS CONTESTS ,
S. L. Cohen, '16, Catches Rankin, '14E,
Off Form and Wins in
Straight Sets
JACK SWITZER DEFEATS McKEE
Yesterday proved to be a big day for
the Ferry field tennis courts, 14
matches in the opening rounds of the
university tennis tournament being
played off before a stop was called on
account of the football game.
S. L. Cohen, '16, furnished the sur-
prise of the day by defeating R. Rank-
in, '14E, in straight sets, 6-1, 6-2.
Cohen showed an increase of pace over
his last year's play, and his speed
swept Rankin off his feet before the
set was under way. Rankin was dis-
tinctly off form and never threatened
his opponent throughout the match.
F. E. McKee, '17L, the Lake Forest
crack, lost to Jack Switzer, '16, in
three sets, 6-1, 2-6, 6-0. McKee
could not handle Switzer's volleys in
the first set, and was not in the run-
ning until Switzer changed his tactics
in the second set and played the back
court. In this position McKee's drives
were too much for Switzer and the
Lake Forest lad made it a set apiece.
Switzer changed his game again in the
final set and won out by brilliant net
play.
Default drawings will be held to-
day, and the results posted on the
board at the athletic association office.
All second round matches should be
played off by Tuesday night.
Summaries of Saturday's play:
Preliminaries-Trost d. Galloway,
6-2, 6-3; Steketee d. Kirkpatrick,
6-4, 6-4.
First round-Codd d. Ewing, 6-1,
6-3; Hulbert d. Brodhead, 6-2, 6-3;
Eaton d. Brucker, 5-7, 6-1, 6-3;
Polasky d. Potts, 6-0, 6-1; Epstean
d. Kent, 6-4, 6-4; Jennings d. Wright,
6-4, 5-7, 6-2; White d. Huntington,
6-2, 6-4; Mack d. McClure, 6-0,
6-0; Wolcott d. Cook, 6-3, 6-3;
Switzer d. McKee, 6-1, 2-6, 6-0;
Nord d. Birmingham, 6-4, 6-2; Craw-
ford d. Gerhardt, 6-1, 7-5; Cohen d.
Rankin, 6-1, 6-2.
Second round-Eaton d. Polasky,
6-4, 6--2.
POPULAR MICHIGAN COUPLE
RECENTLY WED IN INDIANA
David Vesey, '12-'14L, and Miss Lela
Rich, '12, were married, September 19,
at Fort Wayne, Indiana. Miss Rich
was a Delta Gamma and Phi Beta
Kappa; Mr. 'Vessey was for a year

Arnold

&

Co.

STUDENTS' HEADQUARTERS for Remington,
Smith, Royal, Underwood, Oliver, Fox, etc.
1000 Machines Only Michigan Factory
WE RENT--1 month, $2.50; 3 months, $6.50; 6 months, $12; 9 months, $17; include
ribbons and express prepaid. WE SELL new latest models $50'up. Factory re-
built $15 up. State agents CORONA Folding, weight 6 lbs.
Illustrated Catalog Free. Call, write or phone Main 4102
Detroit Typewriter Co., 160 Jefferson, near Woodward
IArnold&Co

220 South Main Street

Jewelers
220 South Main Street

Arnold's for Assortment, the best stock of Watches, Jewelry,
Silverware, etc.
Arnold's for Quality, the reputation earned by 40 years of hon-
est merchandizing.
Arnold's for Repairs, Watch, Jewelry and Optical repairs are
cared for by experts. Guaranteed work at seasonable prices.
Arnold's for Glasses, our Optical Department is in charge of
Mr. Emil H. Arnold, Optometrist, whose entire attention is
devoted to Drugless Eye Testing and making of glasses.
Any broken lenses replaced in our own shop. File your
records with us and save time.

rm

weer- A large number of Poles attending
rt of the university this year are expected
eted. to be present at the inaugural meeting
four of the Polania Literary society which
ical, assembles in McMillan hall, at 2:30
s its o'clock, this afternoon.
part- The aim of this organization is to
3 de- have all Polish students come together
ciety
d in from time to time anl hold discussions
part- on the history and literature of Poland.
ry. A cordial invitation to all new 'Poles
de-
sec- in the university is extended by the
ited older men. An active season is an-
Com- ticipated.
the
t of CANDIDATES FOR COMEDY CLUB
reat- TO HAVE TRYOUT WEDNESDAY
of
Gen- Graduation of Prominent Members
eak- Leaves Many Places For
g as New Men

UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE #
IS OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
Students Are Advised Not to Delay int
Consulting Proper
Authorities
For the benefit of those students who
are unfamiliar with the university
health service, Dr. H. H. Cummings,
head of the staff, has taken this op-
portunity to announce that the health
service is ready at all times to render
medical services to all students of the
university at the office free of charge.1
He advises all students who feel the
need of medical attention to feel per-l

Cosmopolitan club, the Chinese stu-
dents' club, the Polonia club, Union
Latina, or the Armenian Students'
club.
The Cosmopolitan club is the largest
organization of foreign students, hav-
ing a membership of 125.
VARSITY RAMBLES
FOR TEN COUNTERS
(Continued from page 1)
er forward pass with Staatz, and Maul-
betsch plowed across. for the score,
taking a large percentage of the Case
team with him. "Mauley" then ran 53
yards with the kickoff, but Catlett's
pass to Staatz was too late for the

fectly free to consult with the health score to count.
service at any time, and deplores any In the third period Catlett tore off 65
delay in such matters. yards around Staatz, and Hughitt
The health service office at 226 dodged 23 yards through the line for
South Ingalls street is open for such an easy score. Returning the kickoff
purposes every day from 9:00 until 60 yards, Catlett plunged 23 yards on
12:00 o'clock for all students, and on the first play for another score; and
Monday, Tuesday, and Friday after- Maulbetsch bumped across for the last
noons from 2:00 until 4:00 o'clock for counter in this period.
the treatment of men students only. The final period was featured by the
Women students who wish to call in procession of substitutes for Michigan,
the afternoon will have to make spe- and the brace of Case against the
cial appointments with Dr. Elsie S. younger Varsity players. Hughitt and
Pratt, university women's physician. Splawn, who had retired on getting
Whenever any of the health service bumps, went back in, however, and
staff are called to the student's rooms, "Larry" went over for the final score,
a charge of $1.00 will 'be made for with "Tommy" getting the all import-
day and $2.00 for night calls. When ant after point.

he engineer- First trials for candidates for the
nd also to Comedy club will be held in the Cer-
ng room, in' cle Francais rooms in Mason hall at
ering maga- 4:00 o'clock, Wednesday afternoon.
Provision is L. K. Friedman, president of the
take active Comedy club, H. L. Nutting, '15L, and
e society by Mildred Reese, '15, are to act as judg-
the general es in the tryouts. Because of the grad-
n the privi- uation of a number of prominent act-
'ship in any ors in the club at last graduation,
tend. there will be a larger number of new
s take up members to be chosen.
ts members President Friedman plans to work
Each sec- out the cast for this season's play at
east once a an early date.
papers by
cussed. This Library Accessions for Year Are Large

direct supervis-
vho advises and
r plans to open
r to be held on
n the rooms of
g Game Tickets
nell and Penn-
s continue to be
ndent rate un-
It is estimated
tion authorities

The total library accessions July 1,1
1913, and June 30, 1914, including
those of the law library, and the du-
plicates secured for class use, were
15,606, while for the preceding year,
they amounted to 17,731. The acces-
sions for last year were divided among
the several libraries as follows: gen-
eral library, 11,422; engineering li-
brary, 760; medical library, 978; hom-,
eopathic library, 178; dental library,
69; architectural library, 188; law
library, 2,011.
Band Is Trying Out Drum-Majors

horseshoe, with 31 rows of seats and president of the oratorical association.
an ultimate capacity of 46,500. Its es- The couple will reside in Fort Wayne
timated final cost is $500.000.. where Mr. Vesey has a law practice.
Chicago University has a straight
stand which rises 33 rows from the CONTRACTORS RUSHING WORK
ground. It will accommodate 31,000 ON NEW HOMES FOR WOMEN
people, and it is estimated that the
completed structure will reduce the Construction of the two new wom-
surplus of the Rockefeller institution en's dormitories is being pushed rap-
Michigan's completed structure will ,idly, as the contractors are anxious
take the shape of a horseshoe, and to complete the major portion of the
surround three sides of Ferry field. work before the snow flies. By the
When completed, it will seat 52,000 end of January, the last nail will be
people and cost $275,000. driven in the Newberry residence hall,
When all the stadiums are in use, while the other building on South Uni-
Yale will have paid a fraction over $9 versity avenue will not be completed
per seat; Harvard $10.80; Chicago until May. According to present plans,
$14.50; while Michigan will have built neither of the halls will be opened for
her seats for less than $5.30 apiece. . occupancy until next October.

a patient needs to be sent to the hos-
pital, the health service officials will
send him to one of the university hos-
pitals, the university defraying ex-
pense incurred up to 60 days, when a
student is in need -of such attention.
Former IPayers Return For Game
Among former football players back
to see the Case game yesterday were
James K. Watkins, '09, recently re-
turned. from Oxford where he com-
pleted his course as a Rhodes scholar;
Joe Primeau, '09L, Joe Magirsohn,
'10E, Spencer S. Scott, '14, James
Craig, '14, and Squib Torbett, '14, and
Otto Carpell, '12.

The lineup:--
Michigan (69)
Dunne, Staatz, E.
James, D. James LE
Reimann, Fink-
beiner.......... LT
Quail, Benton,
Norton.......LG
Raynsford (C),
Niemann ........'C
Whalen, Millard,
Morse .......... RG
Cochran.......... RT
Lyons, Hildner. ... RE
Hughitt, Zieger,
hughitt........ QB
Maulbetsch, Cohn. LH
Splawn, Catlett,
Mead, Splawn. . .FB
Roehm, Bastian,

Howard,*Hense
..Cullen
..Mitchell
.......Kretch,
Ovingtoil
.. . Hellencamp
........Conant
.......Allan
..Post, Par-
shall (C)
Anderson
. . Fisher

Case(0)

I

ets

er- The band is trying out several can-{
of didates for the position of drum-ma-
er. jor and will be glad of any recruits to
tet the ranks. C. Stanley Lamb, '18, of
tic Duluth, led the band on the field at
yesterday's game.

W ar o r N o W a r
We muvst eat to live
Prices are right at ORENS
. 605East

WAR CUTS ROLL OF
FOREIGN STUDENTS
(Continued from page 1)
tered in the dental department. Michi-
gan shares equal honors with Harvard
in being considered by the government
of South Africa the best place in Eu-
rope or America for instruction in den-
tistry..
The engineering department leads
in the number of foreign students en-
rolled with fifty-four. There are 42
cosmopolitans enrolled in the literary
department, 21 in the department of
dentistry, 15 in the medical depart-
ment and five in the law department.
Most of. these students belong to the

Bentley.......RH ... Black, Page
Score 1 2 3 4 Final
Michigan.....21 20 21 7 69
Case ...... 0 0 0 0 0
Touchdowns-Roehm 2, Dunne,
Hughitt 2, Catlett 2, Maulbetsch 2,
Splawn.
Goals from touchdown-Hughitt 9.
Officials-Referee, Hoagland, Prince-
ton; Umpire, Henry, Kenyon; Head
linesman, Knight, Michigan. Time of
quarters- 10 minutes.

w

r ''

'

--7-

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